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Is there such a thing as TO cool?

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crazy42wheeledtoys,

I read that the kx250f had separate coils, so you would get 30W on each of the 2 wires that don't currently power anything. So you would not have to share the 30W with the ignition. You could power a fan with 30W, and then use the other wire for grip heaters, lights, or whatever. Look at some fans if you can, they often say on the info plate what they require for power. You would not need a battery to run a fan. Just as your light dim as you go low rpm, the fan would suffer some power loss as well. So a battery would compensate for that, and allow the fan to spin fast when you are just sitting there and idling. So a battery helps, but it is not necessary.

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crazy42wheeledtoys,

I read that the kx250f had separate coils, so you would get 30W on each of the 2 wires that don't currently power anything. So you would not have to share the 30W with the ignition. You could power a fan with 30W, and then use the other wire for grip heaters, lights, or whatever. Look at some fans if you can, they often say on the info plate what they require for power. You would not need a battery to run a fan. Just as your light dim as you go low rpm, the fan would suffer some power loss as well. So a battery would compensate for that, and allow the fan to spin fast when you are just sitting there and idling. So a battery helps, but it is not necessary.

30 watts at 12 volts equates to only 2.5 amps, which I think may not be enough to run a fan. I sold my street bike, so I do not own a liquid cooled bike with electric fan backup anymore.

If anyone has a manual for a DRZ, CRF-X, or any bike with electric fan backup, look up the power usage or the fuse size for the fan for us, please.

Thanks :cry:

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Weez, dnot sure where you are in Northern Virginia, but we have several dealers up in your areaa that carry our products. In the event, your dealer does not, just give me a pm and we can ship direct to you. We are out of Roanoke, so the freight will be very little.

Boo

Liquid Performance

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So Engine Ice is just more glycol (antifreeze) then....

How can they justify using the word ICE in their name - seems misleading to me. We're looking at 10 deg or less difference - far from ICE. :cry:

Water Wetter I understand - no major claims with that one. :cry:

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The premise that these manufacturers are working under is that they are providing a liquid that transfers (conducts) heat better. You want the liquid to absorb more heat in the engine, and then transfer that heat to the cooling fins in the radiators. They aren't just using more antifreeze. As a matter of fact, with normal antifreeze, using straight antifreeze will not cool as well as using a 50/50 mix with water. One of the things that I like is that they already pre-mix it with deionized water and come up with a product that has a high boiling point, a low freeze point, enough lubrication for the water pump, and transfers heat well. I use Water Wetter in my truck and can actually tell a difference. Before using it, the motor would "ping" under a load in the summer with the AC on. After adding Water Wetter (2 bottles for the large cooling system), I can only get it to "ping" occasionally. That was enough to convince me that they were on to something. If I were wealthy enough, I'd run Engine Ice in my truck. A high performance bike is more susceptable to heat, and it only takes half a bottle to fill it up, I spend the extra bucks.

Same goes for the oil...I use the Honda HP4 w/ Molly in the engine, because it takes less that a quart for a change. $6 for an oil change is acceptable to me.

Just my 2 cents worth.

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