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Changed my clickers settings "WoW"

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You know its funny how we buy these bikes because they have all the adjustable shocks and stuff.

I used to ride Moab rocks and hardpack desert. I can't tell you what my settings were but I will say I made sure that left and right fork were the same and the shock was about the same as the front.

Basically it was time consuming for me to get her where it wasn't bouncing and wasn't bottoming out. I did change the fork oil to 5W when I checked my steering bearings but after that I figured I was set for my ridding style and weight.

Well I moved to a new area and recently found some woods and jeep mountain trails. Lots of high speed with softball and an occasion football size rocks and holes.

I been getting real tired and arthritis has been bothering my elbows and forarms.

Today I decided to loosen things up and backed off everything top and bottom front and back 2 clicks cause it was easy to remember.

Went on a 100 mile ride over the same trail as last weekend.

It was much more comfortable and I felt in much more control. More relaxed and when I hit the water bars standing up I would jump on the pegs a bit just as I hit them. If you get the timing right you get just a bit of air with a soft landing.

I think I only bottomed the front one time on the ride.

I guess my point to this is that don't get stuck in the rut and not change your settings. Figure out what works for different terrain and let the bike do the work. I been taking a beating for no reason. I know I went faster and tonight I feel like I could have rode more.

Do the rest of you guys change yours much or just leave it the same?

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:excuseme:I have no idea were mine should be for normal riding. What is the best, base line to start from.

With my sm set i just turned them all the way to hard. :cry: I like the way it feels :cry:

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I've been riding on the stock "soft" setting. Very comfy. Last night I jacked the suspension up 10 clicks. VERY solid and responsive. I can't wait to give it a good test!

Dan

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Good post. I never realized so many people never adjusted their suspension. It makes all the difference. In my opinion, the best approach is to figure out what each adjustment does and how to feel the effects of each on your bike. Back out your front compression damping completely and notice how the bike wallows and how even small bumps use up a lot of the travel. Back out the rebound and note how the front end pogo's more the usual and yet get a few extra cycles of the suspension. Keep going with the rear. Also crank the settings to the max one at a time and ride the exact same part of the trail. Once you know what too much rebound, or compression feels like you'll be able to tune any bike. Blindly adjusting settings will get you nowhere. Its kind of funny how many people spend time and money on aftermarket mod's without learning to take advantage of the stock bike's adjustments. The reality is for most people the suspension will determine how fast you are on the trails as oppossed to motor mod's. Good luck :cry:

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thet sound s like very solid advice to go extreme then you know what it feels like to have one pr the other way off and what you didn't like about it or did. If anybody else has a better way to learn the basics I am all ears. Thanks a ton for that little bit of hard learned knowlegde :cry: :cry: :cry:

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I've been responsible for "shock tuning" more then a couple production vehicles. This doesn't make me a motorcycle expert, but the process is similar. This is what works for me :cry:

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I usually change the clickers when I go to a different riding area. This depends on the types of terrain we are riding. One setting will never work perfect for every different riding condition. I just try to find the one that works the best for me.

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I usually change the clickers when I go to a different riding area. This depends on the types of terrain we are riding. One setting will never work perfect for every different riding condition. I just try to find the one that works the best for me.

Exactly. The thing you have to realize is what doesn't feel good, why it doesn't feel good, and what to do about it. Everything else is easy.

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I thought I was mechanicaly inclined and just figured the handlebar side of the forks was the compression adjustment. Its not. Its the rebound. My O1 doesn't have the midrange clicker in the rear just comp and rebound.(opposit of the front "compression on top") Here is a great explanation in addition to whats been posted.

At least I don't feel quite as bad knowing others haven't been doing it. Back in the old days "70's" we just changed the oil and called it good.

Don't forget it isn't going to be the same for everyone just because your the same weight.

Oh by the way, A loose front end could cause clutchles wheelies...... :cry:

Here's the link http://www.off-road.com/dirtbike/tootech.html

Have a safe Ride :cry:

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very good read. I have been playing with my clickers since :pI got the bike. I dont think that I have them perfected yet thou. Any woods sugestions for a 155lb rider?

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I will try and get out there today and count my clicks for a base line.

I think it is a good idea to write it down and save it anyway.

The only other advice I can give is to ride a stretch of trail with some comon obsticales and try and keep your speed and stance the same. Then make a change and do it again. Repeat until you get the results you want. Try to relax your grip a bit so the bike is doing its thing and your just guiding it.

I guess that would be good advice for most ridding...... let the bike do the work and just go for the ride. It seems to know what to do on its own. Especialy in sand washes. Deep sand drives me nuts. I get a death grip and fight until I find myself huffing and puffing and then just stand up lean back and let the bike figure it out.

I need to go to a ridding school. I hardly use the seat to its full extent.

Dirt ridding can be one of the best exercsizes in the world if ride agressiviely. I pretty much just trail ride for fun. I don't like eating dust and I ain't good enough to stay in front without risking getting hurt.

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I have had my KLX400R since August of last year and haven't changed mine yet either. I think that's my next step after dropping in the JD kit and removing the snorkel. I can really relate to the sand wash workout. I've found, however, that sitting forward on the seat while in the sand, with the relaxing of the tired arms, provides the most stability in the sand. A stabilizer would be nice, but don't have the 4-5 hundred bones to put into one. Same with the exhaust, so I just bored my stock one.

On the rear shock, is a spanner wrench a must, or can it be done with something else just as slick?

Thanks for all the great solid info! This is a great post! I love learning about that which I love!!! :cry:

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I've found, however, that sitting forward on the seat while in the sand, with the relaxing of the tired arms, provides the most stability in the sand.

I think you'll find that the further back you sit when in deep sand the quicker you can go with more control. Reference your rear shock question a long punch or screwdriver works well also. :cry:

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I know (mechanically)what happens when I adjust the damping and spring setings on the bike.

However, I am unsure of what an optimal combination is supposed to feel like. I was aware that -from the factory- the suspension settings were set up for a rider about my weight. That gave me a baseline.

So, I rode (my brand new "S") with the factory settings for about 1000 miles, and I figured if something needed to be changed, it would make itself apparent.

I did notice that the rear seemed a little "slow" or "soggy" in medium speed, low frequency whoops. Like the rear settled down too far into the dip and kind of took the bike with it. Also, the front had a little reluctance to turn, and didn't react quickly well to smaller hits.

I made the rear (low speed) compression 2 clicks harder, and made the front compression 2 clicks softer. It seemed to help! :cry: I had a LOT more fun on my last ride! It seemed to respond with much less effort. More "transparent" under me. I could ride more than wrestle.

The point is, I'm no suspension expert. I just left it "factory" until something made itself obvious, and I guess I'll ride it this way till something else obviously needs attention.

I also know that, as I gain riding experience my suspension needs will change, so I'm not going to assume that one setting will be satisfactory forever...

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I was messing with my adjustments yesterday for the first time in 900 miles. Stock setting was a bit soft for my weight so I just went in a click and it changed the entire ride overall for the better. Now that I've read the tuning article i can further test and prolly get it much nicer. :cry:

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I found my fork settings to not be equal from the factory...in fact the right side was half way between clicks.

I turned the tops all the way to the right and backed off 2 clicks on the front and 3 clicks on the rear. I left the bottoms stock. It is much firmer riding, the control is more predictable...yet it is still soft and plush in the rough stuff...to keep me from getting too beat up.

I am 250 pounds, and I have yet bottom my suspension. Although the most air I have have ever caught was probably only about 4 or 5 feet.

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Punch or screwdriver w/hammer assist? If so, won't that marr the heck outta those rings?

Sitting back is great for getting going, yes, but for speeds exceeding 40 MPH in the deep sand, i find a more central to forward location provides the greatest stability/controlability. :cry:

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Two things to remember is

make sure you have the right weight springs for your geared up weight.

Make sure you have the rear race sag set correctly. IIRC it usually 4" to 4 1/4"

If the above two points haven't been taken care of fiddling w/the clickers, while it will change things, is really kind of a waste.

btw if you don't have the right weight springs you won't be able to get your sag right.

If you want to have some real fun pack your suspension off to Factory Connection and get it revalved!! Best $600 you'll ever spend!!!

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make sure you have the right weight springs for your geared up weight.

Make sure you have the rear race sag set correctly. IIRC it usually 4" to 4 1/4"

If the above two points haven't been taken care of fiddling w/the clickers, while it will change things, is really kind of a waste.

Absolutely :cry: Oh, and bleed the air from the forks :cry:

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