Just out of the crate and the Suzuki dealer...........

Do you all have some kind of check list I could use for "what to do" as soon as my '05 RM Z250 is out of the crate?

After I break it in(I'm opting for the "hard" break in for sealing the rings)I'll check valve tolerance/clearance, change the suspension oils and change the gear oil/filter.

I haven't asked the dealer yet, cuz I just was told it's on the ship on it's way right now, exactly what they do to "set it up".

What should or will the dealer do?

Sorry to be so cautious but I want to give this $5,500.+ investment a good start.

Thanks.

A lot of dealers just throw the bike together, im not sure how the rmzs come but most bikes you put the front tire on and the handle bars and sometimes front fender. It doesnt sound like much but the dealer gets charged about 100-150 bucks by suzuki for assembely incase you were wondering why they charge money for that :cry:

I know this is off topic and that I apologize, but the following statement is not correct.

It doesnt sound like much but the dealer gets charged about 100-150 bucks by suzuki for assembely incase you were wondering why they charge money for that

The only fees that must be charged by a dealer (in PA anyways) are state taxes, a title fee unless the dealer chooses to pick up the cost of this, and registration if applicable. Dealers who charge for frieght, doc fees, set-up fees, etc. are charging more because they tend to give low retail prices and must make up the difference in price by charging miscellaneous fees. Many times, but certainly not all these low retail prices with the addition of the misc fees end up being the same or not more then the msrp plus title and tax only. Do not let a dealership bs you, period. They choose the fees that they will charge and not charge. I know this from experience at a dealership that doesn't charge anything other then state tax and a title fee of 22.50.

One thing that everybody seems to over look is that the factory does not put enough grease on the steering bearings and the shock linkage bearings. I lube them all after the first ride with good waterproof grease. Other then that just follow the manual. :cry:

This works for me, hope it helps.

1. Loctite every nut and bolt that holds on the plastic including the airbox bolts under the seat. Do this or loose em.(threadlocker, blue loctite)

2. Pull the swingarm and linkage and pack with a good waterproof grease. I like the Belray Waterproof Grease but that is just me. Do this before you ride the bike. It's cleaner and you'll be glad you did it. This sounds like a pain and it is. The problem is that there is very little lube in these bearings. Do the rear shock too, both ends. (I still ask myself why don't the factories lube these better?)

3. Pull the front end apart and lube the steering bearings.

4. Pull out the airbox and check that it is assembled properly and properly sealed.

5. Tire pressure at 12-14psi.

6. Chain adjusted and lubed.

7. Fluid levels, coolant, oil, brake fluid, fresh fuel.

8. Start the bike and check for fluid leaks and exhaust leaks. You shouldn't have any.

9. Ride the bike for 20 mins and drain the oil. Check the oil for chunks of metal. You will see some shimmering "glitter" but no big chunks. Then use a synthetic oil. Use good oil. Check the filter for chunks, you should not have to replace the filter it at this point, just check it.

10. Check all the fluids again, top up anything and have fun.

11. Keep the air filter cleaned and oiled. Watch the coolant level and oil all the time. Keep good oil in the bike, not just off the shelf automotive oil, use a good synthetic motorcycle oil that meets the specs.

12. After a couple hours of break-in, I replace all the fluids including the fork fluid and rear shock fluid. It gets the break-in particles out of the fluid and your suspension will last longer and work better.

You dont need to put anything about before first ride.make sure oil level is correct[look in little window,coolant level full[remove radiator cap]and airfilter is oiled.theres no reason to tear bike apart before first ride.Manufactures may skimp on grease during assembly but they still use enough for bike to be ridden a few times before you would have to be concerned.

Doing it before the first ride has its benefits though. And I really agree with those drawn out steps. Yes it sounds like a ton of work, but it is necessary to have a bike that lasts a long time. And the BelRay grease is what I use too. That stuff is about the best you can buy. Plus it's only $4 for a good sied tub. Hope you have fun on your new bike! :cry:

I would definetly regrease all greased surfaces before the first ride in the dirt. I use marine trailer bearing grease for all my bearings. The stuff is made for salt water enviroments and lasts a really long time. Yea it isnt the cool blue color of the bel ray grease, but it seems to work better.

I would also check all exposed fasteners...skip the loctite on any fasteners that thread into aluminum. The aluminum threads can really take a beating after repeated removal and installs with loctite.

I would definetly regrease all greased surfaces before the first ride in the dirt. I use marine trailer bearing grease for all my bearings. The stuff is made for salt water enviroments and lasts a really long time. Yea it isnt the cool blue color of the bel ray grease, but it seems to work better.

I would also check all exposed fasteners...skip the loctite on any fasteners that thread into aluminum. The aluminum threads can really take a beating after repeated removal and installs with loctite.

don't loctite the screws that thread into plastic, the threads can possibly crack. I dunno where you live but the grease situation isn't too bad. You can ride it some before you have to worry about greasing the bearings and linkage. It's best to do it before but not totally neccessary. If you hear squeaks, it's time to do it. I must say i disagree somewhat with the "tough breakin" for sealing the rings. While what motoman says is correct, it isn't as good of an idea to do it on a brand new bike. This is because the transmission, clutch and other drivetrain components need to be properly broken in. You don't want to stress the tranny during break in, that could lead to expensive repairs. Once the bike is broken in and you rebuild the engine, do the tough break in by all means.

If you hear squeeks its too late!

Where are you hearing squeels from?

The reason I like to regrease everything before the first ride is that everything is clean. When you slide out the bearing races, there's no grunge on the bearing races or seals, making the lube process easier. The less chance there is to knock chunks of crud into the bearings. Just makes this time consuming task, less time consuming.

Of course it's much nicer to work on a clean bike, but finding that screw in the mud u just took off your bike makes it so much more fun :cry: If you hear squeaks it's too late? What if you take it apart right as you start hearing them? I personally don't have this problem but am curious.

I want more info. on these squeaks. The only squeeks I've heard is when you just wash it and let it sit, then go into the first turn and grab the brakes for the first time. But that's not anything broken or braking.

If you sit on the bike and you hear a squeak then you're in trouble. Sometimes the roller bearings will squeak but that's not as serious.

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