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Deathwings finally got me!! Dunlop D606 Questions?

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It finally happened to me after 1100 miles. I was climbing a hill with very soft sand, all of a sudden the back end came around and I dropped the bike. Thankfully there was very minimal damage, barely noticable. I decided to take the plunge and I ordered Dunlop D606's from Rocky Mountain. My question is, should I attempt to mount them myself, or should I have a shop do it. If shop does it, how much am I expected to pay? Also if I do it myself, will I have to balance the tires, or have you guys noticed that they are fairly balanced when installed. I only have one weight from the factory on the spokes on the rear tire, none in front. Should I take that one off, or leave it on? Sorry for all the questions, but I am trying to figure out if I should buy tire irons or not. Thanks .....

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Wow ! My deathwings lasted 100 miles before i junked them.Bridestone 401/402's worked great at Gorman yesterday(first rain of the season).If you've never mounted your own tires before ,do you have a friend/buddy who has?Watching someone do it would be very helpful.If not it would'nt hurt to have spare tubes,because you might pinch them mounting the tires.Bike shops ususally charge $5-10 bucks per tire-off the bike(less if you buy the tires from them.GOOD LUCK! 😢

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I have had 606's since I removed the deathwing back in 2000. I have never had the tire balanced and I drive on the road constantly, it has never been an issue. I left the lone original weight on there, I figured if anything maybe it was compensating for a heavy part in the rim. My local shop charges $15 to swap the tire if you take the wheel off the bike and I think $25 if you just drive it in. I suppose whether or not you do it yourself matters how much your time is worth. It's not that hard but the first time you do it it's going to take you a while, I'd guess about an hour. The time will go down every time you do it, I'd say it takes me about 20 minutes total now, after about 4 changes.

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One of the shops down here mounts for free if you buy the tire there or $10 for essentially while you wait service on the rim. Around the corner from the office... 😢

I would say having them balanced if you do 80 on the highway is the best choice. It would beat finding out you had a bad bounce/wobble at 87mph, the first time time you hit 87mph, after the tire swap anyway.

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If you have the equipment to do motorcycle tire then go for it if you don't I strongly recomend paying 15 or 20 bucks to have it done and the balance is of little concern with knobbies 😢 :cry:

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This is the best source for info that I have seen.

clicky

Learn how to do it so you can fix a flat on the trail.

Amaze your friends.

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I think this is a neccesary skill for anybody who trail rides to know and be prepared to do. Practicing at home in your garage where you are comfortable and can see well is good practice for when conditions are less favorable. The more practice the easier it gets.

If there were never a chance of you having to fix a tire 30 miles away from civilization then it would not matter. But otherwise...it is a survival skill you must attain.

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Man you guys are lucky with the $10-25 range on getting the local tire guys to change them out for you. A coworker just recently bought a tire from the Kawasaki dealership in Rome,ga and they charged him $90.00 labor on putting the tire on. The tire itself wasn't but $55-60 bucks. I asked him if they used any KY jelly? I am going to attempt to change mine out myself, I mean I can buy the unabiker rad. guards for $90.

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Just an idea you may wanna try an MT21 for a front over the D606 in the future. Little more road friendly. 😢 :cry:

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I paid $60 at my local dealer to have them put my 606's on the bike. That was for the front and rear.

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If I change them myself, how do I balance them? Is there a fairly inexpensive static balancing machine out there? If so, how much is it, and where can I buy one.

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I had to change mine out at 260 miles. I paid $70 to ride the bike in and have both tires changed. Next time, I do it! 😢

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I recently swapped the deathwings for knobblies and did it myself using three big, strong, 13.5" tyre levers and instructions from here. The fitting was easy and I would be happy doing a tyre change on the trail now.

I didn't get the tyres balanced and haven't noticed any significant vibration even though I've run the bike at up to 70mph.

Take care with the new tyres on pavement because they will have a lot less grip than the trailwings. It's very easy to lock up the front being ham-fisted on the brakes.

Cheers

Ian

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The D606 rear is a very good DOT dirt tire. I get about 500-750 miles on a tire, all off road. If I did more on road miles, I'd probably favor the MT21. Also good off road, but marginally better for street use.

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You can gravity balance them. Just palce your wheel on the axel and suspend the axel on two jack stands. The heavy part of the wheel will rest at the bottom. Move the wheel slightly in either direction. If it keeps resting in the same spot...you have located the heavy spot. Now add some weight opposite of the heavy spot. Keep doing this until the wheel remains where you place it and does not settle back to a heavy spot.

It's not 100%...but will get you close enough to eliminate most of the vibration and the head shake that occompanies the imbalance.

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The D606 rear is a very good DOT dirt tire. I get about 500-750 miles on a tire, all off road. If I did more on road miles, I'd probably favor the MT21. Also good off road, but marginally better for street use.

Holy Crap!!! That's terrible!!! You must constantly be spinnin' those tires in rocky terrain to only get 5-7 hundred miles on a tire...expecially a 606! Dang...I thought 1200 riding on pavement 90% was bad... 😢

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That is probably all I will get out of mine. Roosting and wheelies are fun...but wear really fast.

It is all in how you ride. Some grandma rider on this thread claimed over 8000 miles and looked like new.

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Yeah...I caught that too...That's unreal...probably never wheelied, roosted, or got above 3 thousand RPM or 50 MPH!

Probably get 70 MPG too! 😢 :cry: 😢

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I bought my rear 606 at Malcom Smiths for $56. and they mounted and balanced it for $10. more. (+ tax to all the above)

I'll pay $10. for some one to mount my tire any day 😢

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