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Anodizing question

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I was wondering if anyone here had some knowledge about anodizing...

Between my two bikes I have a bunch of red anodized parts. Some things, like Pro Circuit red axle blocks, are bright red and shiny and they keep that look forever without fading. Other parts aren't shiny when new and very quickly (within a couple of months!) fade to an ugly pink color. I assumed that the problem was a different anodizing method but I asked one person and he told me that some billet stuff is made of softer aluminum (for easy machining) and that aluminum doesn't respond as good to anodizing. Does anyone work in the industry and have some knowledge about this? If it's just the anodizing then I'm going to have a bunch of stuff redone... but if it's the metal itself then re-anodizing would be a waste of time and money.

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Hey Greg,

Why not shoot an email out to Jeff and East Coast Wheels, He may know. :cry:

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Some background info. Anodizing is a process that creates a layer of aluminum-oxide (Al2O3) on the surface of an aluminum alloy material. If the aluminum-oxide layer is of sufficient thickness and hardness, the anodizing can be very resistant to wear and corrosion (so called hard anodizing). If the aluminum-oxide layer is thin, it is mainly done for cosmetics as the aluminum-oxide layer scratches easily. Lots of different colors are available.

Your friend was right - - - sort of. Many different aluminum alloy compositions are used to manufacture motorcycle parts. Some of these alloys do not respond as well to anodizing as others. For example, I believe 6061 series aluminum is easier to anodize than 7075 series aluminum. Other factors such as the quality of the anodizing process itself, color selection, environmental factors, etc. might affect fading. So I don't think there's an easy answer to your fading question.

Powdercoating is another alternative. It's cheaper and a lot friendlier to the environment.

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My little contribution to this thread will be on how to remove anodizing.Through my association w/auto restorers,

Easy-off oven cleaner old yellow spray aerosol type will

remove color :cry:

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The anodizing color comes from dye that is captured in the aliminum oxide layer.

The reason some parts fade and others don't is strictly the quality of the dye.

Many dyes break down with exposure to UV rays. Sun fading.

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Yeah... what he said. Also, red and black are the two worse colors to anodize. Red turns pink and black turns brown.

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If you want the looks to last get the part clear Powder Coated with a UV proof Powder. You can also have a painter clear coat it but that is not as tough as Powder Coating. I have done this to some Polished Parts as well with vairing results.

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There is also a difference in the processes if I remember. "Bright dip" anodizing puts another layer of UV coating and it is shiny. The other stuff is cheaper commercial grade anodizing with no coating, Different grades will color differently and castings are a no no. Maybe this helps. You can get powder coatings that look like anodizing but it adds to the part thickness. Anodizing doesn't

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