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Utah dual sport req.

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Hi, anybody know Utah's street legal requirements for dirtbikes? Specifically, can a two stroke get a plate? I was thinking of buy a KTM 200EXC dualsport from the canadian importers motorcycle-brokers. Actually its for my dad in Utah; wouldn't have any problems in WY.

Thanks,

Brad

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Pretty much the same for most of the western states. Brake light, mirror, horn, headlight, licence plate light. not sure about high/low beams. You may be able to pass non DOT tires off to some inspectors.

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So then plating a 2-stroke is not a problem in Utah?

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So then plating a 2-stroke is not a problem in Utah?

I'm sure it is. I've yet to see a two stroke street legal dual sport. I'll search for the laws and post back.

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Hi, anybody know Utah's street legal requirements for dirtbikes? Specifically, can a two stroke get a plate? I was thinking of buy a KTM 200EXC dualsport from the canadian importers motorcycle-brokers. Actually its for my dad in Utah; wouldn't have any problems in WY.

Thanks,

Brad

In most states, the process for licensing a dirt bike requires that you apply for a title for registering the vehicle and have it inspected for compliance with state vehicle codes. Upon passing the inspection and submitting the inspection paperwork to the DMV, the motor vehicle department will issue a plate and registration for the bike based on the new title.

Some states, however when reviewing the bike's vehicle identification number (VIN) will refuse to issue a reconstructed vehicle title because their records show that this vehicle is designated as an off-highway vehicle in the manufacturer's statement of origin. This is a bureaucratic roadblock that in some states is very difficult to side step. The funny thing is, if the bike had a custom frame without a VIN, the same vehicle would be registerable as a reconstructed vehicle (go figure!). Some states, however, will allow you to re-title a bike that you could not otherwise, by titling it first in another state and transferring that title into your current resident state. New Jersey, for example, will not issue you a title for your dirt bike. You can, however, register and/or title a bike in Vermont, which will register motorcycles anywhere (call 802-828-2000), and then you can use this registration to apply for a New Jersey title. States in which we have experienced difficulty navigating around this bureaucratic road block include Iowa, Wisconsin, Washington, Florida and Alaska. Nearly all the rest of the states including California and New York (a few states we have no experience or paperwork for), will allow conversions under the reconstructed vehicle process.

Once you have a title, however, you are not home free. You must have the vehicle inspected for compliance with state vehicle codes before a license will be issued for the vehicle. This inspection is done by various licensed agencies in your state; sometimes its an official inspection station, sometimes a garage, in some states the inspections are done by motorcycle dealers.

Equipment requirements vary from state to state and are delineated in the states vehicle code. Every state requires the federal minimum equipment: a headlight with a high/low beam, and indicator light visible to the operator to show when high beam is on, a horn, a battery powered taillight and brake light which must operate for 15 minutes on battery power alone (some states are very lax on the previous requirement) and a rearview mirror (Alaska, Maryland, Oklahoma, Washington and Nevada require left and right side mirrors).

Our records show that Delaware, Nevada, New Hampshire, California, Kansas, Oregon and New York require turnsignals. Speedometers are required in the District of Columbia, Mississippi, New York, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Iowa, Maryland, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. Utah has an odometer requirement only. States not mentioned have no speedometer or odometer requirements.

Most standard dirt bikes meet the varying state requirements for brakes, handlebar height, and other features. Check the vehicle code for your state regarding its individual peculiarities. Tires and lights should have some indication that they are DOT approved. By supplying the required lighting equipment, Baja Designs gives you a clean and reliable way of meeting the state standards without adding a lot of heft to the bike. Depending on your state, additional equipment such as tires and a speedo may be required, but they can be added easily.

But will my bike be truly legal? What about steel gas tanks, emissions equipment, mufflers, neutral indicator lights, side reflectors, etc.? These are common questions. Under federal law, motorcycles manufactured for sale in the United States for use on the street have to meet certain safety, equipment and emission standards. Manufacturers must meet these regulations to be able to have their dealers sell them for street use. As a private party, however, you do not have to meet federal standards when converting your off-road motorcycle for street use. It is your responsibility to meet the state vehicle code standards dictated by the highway patrol and the department of motor vehicles for the state in which you are licensing it. Most state vehicle codes have no requirements for such things as steel gas tanks or emissions equipment for motorcycles. Mufflers must be of reasonable sound output, and the vehicle has to conform to certain lighting and equipment standards, but that's it. Under current laws, you are perfectly legal.

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So then plating a 2-stroke is not a problem in Utah?

I'm sure it is. I've yet to see a two stroke street legal dual sport. I'll search for the laws and post back.

Actually...I think you could easily plate a 2-smoke so long as it

meets the requirements. After all, Yamaha had the RZ350s forever and

our pit bike is a Yamaha Razz, 50-cc 2-smoker fully street legal.

Utah requires the following:

1. A mirror, left hand mounted.

2. Tail lamp

3. Brake lamp

4. License plate lamp

5. Rear reflector

6. Horn

7. The rules do not specifically state that you must have a headlamp.

The statute reads and I quote, "A headlamp, when factory-equipped,

shall not be removed or modified". That tells me you can't remove it

or modify it if it came with one from the factory. No high-beam

requirement mentioned either.

8. The law does not specifically mention DOT tires as a requirement

either. However, if you attempt to get an inspection, it clearly

states in the inspection book that the tech is to fail the inspection

if the bike does not have DOT stamped on the tires.

Turn signals are NOT required but if they're installed after the fact,

they must be functional.

Of course, you need liability insurance at the minimum and you need

to carry your registration on the bike, duh!

OT, did you know that Utah requires off roaders to carry their bike

registrations on them as well? I bet 100% of those people at the

dunes don't have a copy of their reg with them... :cry:

Look at my sig and you'll see I've already been this route. Get your

bike legal and inspected before you even consider going to the DMV.

They won't give you the time of day without a safety inspection.

It's worth it, but be prepared for higher licensing costs as

well. :cry:

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Actually...I think you could easily plate a 2-smoke so long as it

meets the requirements. After all, Yamaha had the RZ350s forever and

our pit bike is a Yamaha Razz, 50-cc 2-smoker fully street legal.

They don't make either of these anymore (2001 was the last year for the RAZZ)

Utah requires the following:

1. A mirror, left hand mounted.

Correct

2. Tail lamp

Correct

3. Brake lamp

Correct (must have brake light switch).

4. License plate lamp

Correct

5. Rear reflector

Correct

6. Horn

Correct

7. The rules do not specifically state that you must have a headlamp.

The statute reads and I quote, "A headlamp, when factory-equipped,

shall not be removed or modified". That tells me you can't remove it

or modify it if it came with one from the factory. No high-beam

requirement mentioned either.

You must have a headlight

8. The law does not specifically mention DOT tires as a requirement

either. However, if you attempt to get an inspection, it clearly

states in the inspection book that the tech is to fail the inspection

if the bike does not have DOT stamped on the tires.

Therefore you need DOT tires

Turn signals are NOT required but if they're installed after the fact,

they must be functional.

You are correct

Of course, you need liability insurance at the minimum and you need

to carry your registration on the bike, duh!

You are correct

OT, did you know that Utah requires off roaders to carry their bike

registrations on them as well? I bet 100% of those people at the

dunes don't have a copy of their reg with them... :cry:

Look at my sig and you'll see I've already been this route. Get your

bike legal and inspected before you even consider going to the DMV.

They won't give you the time of day without a safety inspection.

It's worth it, but be prepared for higher licensing costs as

well. :cry:

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Alright R1, now that you nit-picked my post apart...

You're right, neither of those are available anymore but Yamaha still

offers at least one, maybe two different two-stroke scooters that

are street legal.

No where have I been able to find the statute that states in writing

that DOT tires are required. Who's to say that the guy that wrote the

manual for the inspection techs doesn't like dirtbikes? Hmm... :cry:

I for one run and will continue to run DOT tires just for the safety

factor. If push came to shove, a guy could push the issue of whether

or not DOT tires are required, but by doing so would bring the

topic of plating dirtbikes under the scrutiny of lawmakers and NONE

of us want that.

My point is, put the legal stuff on your 2-stroke and go get a

plate. Until Utah has IM requirements for those, you're going to be

able to get it done...

OASN, we ran into a guy at Moab last year with a 300EXC from WA that

was plated...very cool. :cry:

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Hi, anybody know Utah's street legal requirements for dirtbikes? Specifically, can a two stroke get a plate? I was thinking of buy a KTM 200EXC dualsport from the canadian importers motorcycle-brokers. Actually its for my dad in Utah; wouldn't have any problems in WY.

Thanks,

Brad

I have an '05 KTM 300 E/XC. I just got it plated 2 weeks ago here in Utah. KTM makes an OEM brake light switch. I can get you the part number if you want. You just replace the stock banjo bolt on your rear master cylinder. I bought a bike horn and a bike mirror and that was it. I also bought some cheap DOT tires but didn't want to go through the hassle of installing them since I will rarely if ever ride on the road, so I just took it to the local service station and wasn't even hassled about it. Technically, if I was pulled over while riding on the road they could probably get me on that. However, the official traffic code does not specifically state that they have to be DOT tires (as someone has already mentioned). But, the inspectors supposedly have that on their list.

Yes, a 2-stroke can be dual-sported in Utah.

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In case anyone cares, here is the section from the Utah Traffic Code on the requirements for making a bike street-legal. I forgot to mention in my previous post that I also had to put a small red reflector on the rear fender. I've also included the sub-section regarding tires:

41-6-154.50. Motorcycles -- Required equipment -- Brakes.

(a) Every motorcycle and every motor-driven cycle shall be equipped with the following items, which shall comply with the regulations of the department:

(1) one head lamp which, when factory equipped with an automatic lighting ignition system, shall not be disconnected;

(2) one tail lamp;

(3) either a tail lamp or a separate lamp shall be so constructed and placed as to illuminate with a white light the rear registration plate;

(4) one red reflector on the rear, either as part of the tail lamp or separately;

(5) one stop lamp;

(6) a braking system, other than parking brake, as provided in Section 41-6-145;

(7) a horn or warning device in accordance with Section 41-6-146;

(8) a muffler and emission control system in accordance with Section 41-6-147;

(9) a mirror in accordance with Section 41-6-148; and

(10) tires in accordance with Section 41-6-150.

(:cry: The commissioner is authorized to require an inspection of the braking system on any motor-driven cycle and to disapprove any such braking system on a vehicle which in his opinion is equipped with a braking system that is not designed or constructed as to insure reasonable and reliable performance in actual use.

© The commissioner may refuse to register or may suspend or revoke the registration of any vehicle referred to in this section when he determines that the braking system thereon does not comply with the provisions of this section.

(d) No person shall operate on any highway any vehicle referred to in this section in the event the commissioner has disapproved the braking system upon such vehicle.

Enacted by Chapter 242, 1979 General Session

Download Code Section Zipped WP 6/7/8 41_04211.ZIP 2,557 Bytes

41-6-150. Tires which are prohibited -- Regulatory powers of state transportation department -- Winter use of studs -- Special permits -- Tread depth.

(a) Every solid rubber tire on a vehicle shall have rubber on its entire traction surface at least one inch thick above the edge of the flange of the entire periphery.

(:cry: No person shall operate or move on any highway any motor vehicle, trailer, or semitrailer having any metal tire in contact with the roadway.

© No tire on a vehicle moved on a highway shall have on its periphery any block, stud, flange, cleat, or spike or any other protuberances of any material other than rubber which project beyond the tread of the traction surface of the tire, except as otherwise provided in this section. The state department of transportation may by regulation permit the use of tires on a vehicle having protuberances other than rubber when it concludes that they will not damage the highway significantly, or constitute a hazard to life, health or property. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in this section or in any such regulation, it is permissible to use on a vehicle tires with protuberances consisting of tungsten carbide studs during the periods of October fifteenth through December thirty-first and January first through March thirty-first of each year if the tungsten carbide studs shall not project beyond the tread of the traction surface of the tire more than .050 inches; but tires bearing these tungsten carbide studs shall not be used at any time on a vehicle with a maximum gross weight in excess of 9,000 pounds unless the vehicle is an emergency vehicle or school bus, an emergency vehicle or school bus being allowed to use tires bearing these studs during these periods. It shall be permissible to use farm machinery with tires having protuberances which will not injure the highway, and also it shall be permissible to use tire chains of reasonable proportions upon any vehicle when required for safety because of snow, ice, or other conditions tending to cause a vehicle to skid.

(d) The Department of Transportation and local authorities in their respective jurisdictions may, in their discretion, issue special permits authorizing the operation upon a highway of traction engines or tractors having movable tracks with transverse corrugations upon the periphery of such movable tracks or farm tractors or other farm machinery, the operation of which upon a highway would otherwise be prohibited under this chapter.

(e) A person shall not operate any vehicle when one or more of the tires in use on that vehicle is in unsafe operating condition or has a tread depth less than 2/32 inch measured in any two adjacent tread grooves at three equally spaced intervals around the circumference of the tire but such measurements shall not be made at the location of any tread wear indicator, tie bar, hump or fillet.

(f) A person in the business of selling tires shall not sell or offer for sale for highway use any tire which is in unsafe condition or which has a tread depth of less than 2/32 inch measured as specified in Subsection (e).

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Alright R1, now that you nit-picked my post apart...

You're right, neither of those are available anymore but Yamaha still

offers at least one, maybe two different two-stroke scooters that

are street legal.

No where have I been able to find the statute that states in writing

that DOT tires are required. Who's to say that the guy that wrote the

manual for the inspection techs doesn't like dirtbikes? Hmm... :cry:

I for one run and will continue to run DOT tires just for the safety

factor. If push came to shove, a guy could push the issue of whether

or not DOT tires are required, but by doing so would bring the

topic of plating dirtbikes under the scrutiny of lawmakers and NONE

of us want that.

My point is, put the legal stuff on your 2-stroke and go get a

plate. Until Utah has IM requirements for those, you're going to be

able to get it done...

OASN, we ran into a guy at Moab last year with a 300EXC from WA that

was plated...very cool. :cry:

N7SLC and mknight;

Both dealerships I worked at, would fail you if you had non-DOT rubber.

N7SLC;

I'm glad you run DOT tires, not only is it Legal, but as you pointed out previously; SAFER! :cry:

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Yep, the local shop just up the road will fail them without DOT

tires as well. I see a lot of posts about people putting the DOTs on

just for inspection them remove them for dirt tires.

Personally, I prefer the stiffer sidewalls of the DOT tires as I

really like the twisties on my DRZ... :cry:

The off-road rubber scares me on the pavement.

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I agree regarding the DOT tires and once my stock tires are worn, I will put on the DOT tires. I purchased a brand new rear DOT tire that was sitting in my garage but I still have to buy a front. My problem was that I was up against a time constraint to get the bike licensed and didn't want to go through the expense and hassle of putting the new tires on so I thought I would take my chances. I knew that there was a very very slim chance that I would be doing any serious street riding in the near future and that within a few months I would have the stock knobbies worn.

The Kenda TrakMaster is incredibly cheap and has knobs as aggressive and deep as the Maxxis IT I like to run. I'll be really curious how it performs once the stock Bridgestones wear.

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The Kenda TrakMaster is incredibly cheap and has knobs as aggressive and deep as the Maxxis IT I like to run. I'll be really curious how it performs once the stock Bridgestones wear.

They are really good in the dirt, but they don't wear very well.

The manufacturer recommends putting 100-miles of easy street riding

before pounding them...I ignored that warning and they chunked

badly...the 2nd one lastly considerably longer after some road miles.

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New member here, please guide me if I break any forum etiquette.

Very useful information on here - read the whole thing. Some goob at the dealer told me I had to buy a kit for $509.00 cause utah required signals, speedo, etc etc - lots of crap. Not actually the case apparently?

I'm all about doing things a little on the cheap, so my question is does anyone know of a place in ogden or salt lake that has things in stock like brake switches, horns LED's and stuff like that? Don't really want to wait for all that crap to come in the mail. I'm thinking I could spend at least less than half what that kit costs. Or am I just being too cheap?

Opinions welcome. Thanks.

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There is a sticky at the top of the forum about plating requirements. I linked it below for convenience.

I believe Commando's post is accurate, but haven't researched it myself. Note that turn signals are required. Utah LEOs were giving tickets earlier in year for lack of turn signals, so that seems to confirm the requirements. Haven't heard about that in a number of months though...

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=622230

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I got the official books right here on making a bike street legal in Utah (since I'm in the middle of doing one, a TT-R125L Motard), and theres nothing I can find that keep you from making a 2-stroke street legal...here in Utah.

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Thanks everybody. I found a good place in salt lake to get dual sport parts like brake light switch, separate brake light, etc. - the other place didn't have that sort of stuff. Cost me about 85 bucks but they were out of mirrors and it sounds like I should really get some signals or take my chances.

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Yonmore

you dug up a 2 year old post. Some regs have changed but more important the enforcement has changed. Signals required is the big difference.

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Ok I'll be getting signals but here's another thing I ran into just now when I took my inspection and title to the DMV - she asked me if I wanted to go on and off road and if I want to do both then I have to go get another inspection done on it. ***? If it's safe on the road why wouldn't it be safe off the road? And what about people and their jeeps who are registered for on road only and still go off road? She just shrugged her shoulders, of course she didn't make the laws. She told me the difference was the fees - if you register for both on and off road you pay all the fees up front. But *** would I need another inspection with a special inspection form?

What have you guys done about this? Plate it for on road and chance it when you go off road? I read a post somewhere about people getting crap in moab for this reason. Any loopholes that anyone is aware of? Like possibly plating it for on road and then switching it to off road and keeping the plate? Might run into issues renewing the tags. Or not. Any ideas?

Thanks.

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