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05 front end

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I just got the 05 CRF250 and its a fun bike. However I'm not to happy with the frone end. It seems to be real light and twitchy. In corners it kind of floats through rather than plant the tire to the ground. It does corner but not like I had hoped it would. I have adjusted the sag and raised and lowered the forks but have not found a happy medium. Should I go with 20mm offset clamps and/or suspension link? What are you guys doing?

THanks

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Stock, mine holds a berm well but seems to push on flat turns. If I slow down the rebound on my Enzo forks it packs. Maybe 22mm clamps is the answer. According to MXA they prefer the 20mm on the 04 which is 24 stock. Since the 05 is 22mm stock because of the new axle location, 22mm clamps would make it 20mm overall. Get it? Do it and let us know. us know

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People just do not understand what the offset of the triple clamp is. It has nothing to do with the location of the axle.

Simply put, triple clamp offset is the distance from the center of the stem hole (in the clamp) to an imaginary line drawn from the center of one fork leg hole to the other.

So, if you go from 24mm offset clamps to 20mm offset clamps you pull the fork legs in closer to the head tube (relative to front-rear on the bike). This does not effect the rake and trail, but moves the CG of the bike closer to the front wheel and also reduces the rotational resistance of the forks around the head tube.

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If 22 is enough ,would the applied clamps from an 02 450crf fit ? are the forks the same mm?

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People just do not understand what the offset of the triple clamp is. It has nothing to do with the location of the axle.

Simply put, triple clamp offset is the distance from the center of the stem hole (in the clamp) to an imaginary line drawn from the center of one fork leg hole to the other.

So, if you go from 24mm offset clamps to 20mm offset clamps you pull the fork legs in closer to the head tube (relative to front-rear on the bike). This does not effect the rake and trail, but moves the CG of the bike closer to the front wheel and also reduces the rotational resistance of the forks around the head tube.

Clamps definitely affect the trail. Since you measure trail as the distance between a line drawn through the steering head, to the ground in front of the axle, and a line drawn from the axle straight down to the ground, when you decrease the clamp offset, you increase the trail. Also if you were to draw a line from the center of the steering head to the axle, any decrease in the clamp offset (Moving the axle back), results in a steepening of the "effective rake". Check out this diagram: http://www.kreuzotter.de/english/elenk.htm

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I had the same feeling on my 04, especially after coming off of a yamaha 250f. I set sag at 100mm, raised forks 1/8" above line on the forks and added fastway link. The bike corners great now.

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Yeah, what Tuner said. So will changing to 22mm offset clamps make the bike turn better? Will the bike be more prone to headshake or other compromises?

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Three things that I always do with the front fork on a new bike: 1. Set the adjusters to the owners manual adjustments, even if its not "How you usually run 'em". You may learn something about how the manufacturer thinks the fork should work. 2. Loosen the top caps on the forks, and slide the wheel all the way to the bottom of the travel, so the wheel is up against the front fender. Now loosen the axle pinch bolts and notice if the fork leg moves any side to side (I've seen 'em move a 1/16"). Take note of where it locates on the axle. This will insure that you don't have a bind, that the fork legs are parallel. Now tighten the pinch bolts before letting the wheel back down. Doing this will insure that the fork moves smoothly throughout its travel. Bouncing it up and down before you tighten the pinch bolts is hit and miss. 3. Put a zip tie on one of the fork legs, so after you ride you can see how much travel you still have left at the end of the day. If you are using all the travel, you may need to add oil to the fork, or need stiffer springs. If you have 2" of travel left, you may need to remove some oil to get full travel. This makes a difference in how the bike settles into a corner, how it turns and tracks, etc. As an example, if you had 2" of travel left at the end of the day, it is a certainty that the bike will not turn correctly because you are not settling into the working range where the fork was designed to work. Adjusting the fork up and down 5mm in the clamps ain't gonna' cure it. I like to have between 1/2" to 1" left at days end. Once you get all that in the zone, then make your preference adjustments (Clickers). If that doesn't make you happy........then start spending money! I'm assuming you will take the same care with the rear shock adjustments. I've hesitated to sell favorite bikes because I just didn't want to go through what is necessary to dial in the new scoot.....It takes time and patience to get it right.

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People just do not understand what the offset of the triple clamp is. It has nothing to do with the location of the axle.

Simply put, triple clamp offset is the distance from the center of the stem hole (in the clamp) to an imaginary line drawn from the center of one fork leg hole to the other.

So, if you go from 24mm offset clamps to 20mm offset clamps you pull the fork legs in closer to the head tube (relative to front-rear on the bike). This does not effect the rake and trail, but moves the CG of the bike closer to the front wheel and also reduces the rotational resistance of the forks around the head tube.

Clamps definitely affect the trail. Since you measure trail as the distance between a line drawn through the steering head, to the ground in front of the axle, and a line drawn from the axle straight down to the ground, when you decrease the clamp offset, you increase the trail. Also if you were to draw a line from the center of the steering head to the axle, any decrease in the clamp offset (Moving the axle back), results in a steepening of the "effective rake". Check out this diagram: http://www.kreuzotter.de/english/elenk.htm

I think we are reading this 2 diferent ways. Since this is a bicycle diagram, let's clarify this. On a bicycle, the steering head and fork are on the same line. There is no triple clamp offset. So, on a m/c, would the line for measuring trail follow the head tube, or the forks? I thought it was like this: Draw an imaginary line perpindicular with the ground through the axle and then draw an imaginary line on the angle of the rake that extends to the ground. The trail is the distance between them on the ground.

elenkgeom.gif

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The line for measuring trail follows the line through the steering head tube, it is the fixed point. You are correct in drawing the line through the steering head stem (head tube) to the point where it would contact the ground in front of the axle, and in drawing the line straight down from the axle. When you reduce the offset of the clamps you pull both fork legs (and the axle) back toward the frame, which increases the distance on the ground (trail) because the steering head stem line remains in the same place. Ultimately, as far as offset clamps are concerned, you are still measuring the distance between the steering head, and the axle, "B" in this diagram. It just happens that motorcycles use offset clamps as an adjustable part of the assembly, as do a lot of mountain bikes now.

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Since the 05 is 22mm stock because of the new axle location, 22mm clamps would make it 20mm overall. Get it? Do it and let us know. us know

Where did you read that?

I am also coming of a Yamaha 250f. That bike did not corner as tight but it tracked MUCH better in sweepers and was alot more stable (and heavy). I know I can not have the best of both worlds but it would be nice.

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I dont know if we need to get this technical , but I have a set of 22mm offset clamps on my 05 250f and combined with the change they made in the wheel placement equals out to about 20mm offset. I put the fork tubes on the lower line and now this bike rails the inside of off camber turns with no push. I have noticed no headshake and I raced a course with a 4th pinned straightaway this weekend. The one thing I did notice is that the front end became a little harsh ,probably because of the changes that accompany the offset change , but a few clicker adjustments and all was well on the homefront. I used to ride a yzf and this bike did not corner as well in my opinion (in stock form). A set of applied 22mm offset factory clamps run about 279.00 from motosport outlet and besides they look cool (if your not fast just look the part 😢 :cry: 😢 :cry:)

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