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camshaft timing bad, lousy dealer

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After getting my LTZ400 back from the dealer I was not pleased. They had replaced a failed tranny and case under warranty which was the only good thing. The bad was it took four months to fix. They aparently were waiting for parts. Finally I pick up the bike and It keeps falling into gear when pushed in neutral. The water temp light wasn't working with the ignition check and the engine would barely run. I took it back immediately and after another week and a half it still wasn't right. They fixed the tranny problem but the others were still there. They said my cams and large carb was the cause. Also the bike was running hot with a glowing header. The jetting was spot on and no glowing header when I brought it in.

Anyway, I gave up on them and looked into it my self. It turned out they had shorted out the wire harness and zapped my yosh CDI. There was a new harness on the bike which they admitted. This explained the water temp light. Installing the stock CDI proved this. The moron who worked on my bike had a hard time getting the stock boot on the FCR40mm carb so he lubed it with a heap of bearing grease. The grease melted and clogged up the carb(was able to clean it). The bike still ran poorly and hot but the cooling sys seemed ok. The glowing header pipe was not from lean jetting. After two days of pulling my hair out it hit me like a shot of 151. The timing must be out. I though I'd find a cam sprocket a tooth off when I took the valve cover off. Well the timing marks lined up but the sprocket on the intake cam had been moved to the extreme of it's adjustment. The bolts were very tight and it had not slipped. The mechanic must have removed the sprocket to get the chain off? I moved the sprocket back to it's original position as best as I could and It helped dramaticaly. It's still not perfect. I don't have a degree wheel or a guage to time it correctly. What should I do. I refuse to bring it back to my dealer. Should I just buy a new intake cam(hotcams) or the stuff to time it. I have never timed a cam but think I understand the process. If I install a new cam(comes timed to 108') what are the odds I will have to change the valve shims? I'm looking for less "down time" at this point, now that the bike is running better. BTW my dealer is Maximum Motor Sports in Riverhead, NY.

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Quickest, cheapest and most reliable is to send the cam to Hot Cams and have them reset the sprocket. You can do it yourself but you need a lot of expensieve tools and time to learn the process. Are you sure the dealer damaged the CDI? The new harness might be the only problem. I would assume the Yosh "kill wire" needs to be "open" like on a DRZ400E, not grounded like a DRZ400S.

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cam timing is not a big deal in fact you would be surprized at how far out cam timing can be. which is a result of "stacked tollerances" all you need is a dial indicator a timing wheel and a home made piston stop. Install the timing wheel. locate exact TDC and use the indicator on the valve spring to determine exactly when the valve opens and closes. your hot cams come with timing specs. these can be adjusted for instance you mentioned 108degrees that is what is called lobe center. pick up a cam book and read up on this process and you will be amazed as how much hidden power can be found by just fine-tuning your cam timing.

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cam timing is not a big deal in fact you would be surprized at how far out cam timing can be.

your joking right 😢 If not,,, please stop posting your suggestions on motor setup. While your statements only show your lack of understanding to those that know the real deal,, you may actually be confusing those that do not know any better. I think you might understand what your talking about,, but the way you just posted it,, is way off.

Cam timing is always a big deal, iron V8 or thumper motorcycle.. it is measured down to the degree.... for both performance needs, and valve to piston clearance in many motors.. It is not something you "guess" at.

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