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Keeping up with larger displacement bikes

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🤣 I ride a 01' 250f.

Alot of my friends ride 450s or 650s. I've come to find out that on a smaller bore bike one must ride much harder to "keep up" with these bigger bikes, no secret I guess.

On wide open dirt roads I'm in 4th or 5th gear standining up in the attack position screamin rpm and my buddies just come motoring by in 4th or 5th at low rpm sitting down like its a walk in the park!

In contrast on one recent singletrack trail which was uphill and muddy The 650s could just tractor up at low rpm not spinning the tire at all! Me on the otherhand had the bike in 1 or 2nd clutching the bike all the way trying not to spinn the rear tire, but not much luck, It seems like my bike has to run in the higher rpm range. Also When I would get a little out of shape and let off the gas I'd lose momentum (remember uphill and muddy!) And trying to get going again is difficult without breaking traction.

Anyone else have any thoughts on this?

I'm an intermediate rider who can handle most singletrack type stuff as long as it doesnt get to technical. (rocky, muddy, steep hill climbs give me trouble 😢 :cry: 😢) 😢 :cry:

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not much you can do about the 4th or 5th wide open, theyre just faster and im sure you dont wanna give up all of your low end just for a little speed. just get out there and practice, nothing better for yourself than to practice. get otu to the gym maybe, and know your bike very well. they have you in the speed, just get them in the skill department

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Take comfort in knowing that rider skill is far more a factor than the bike. One of my riding buddies rides an '82 Honda XL250R. He has enough of a skill advantage over me to overcome my equipment advantage in all but a very very few situations. If that's not comfort enough, you'll have to surrender and get a more powerful bike.

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Whoya, a couple of things you can do on the chugging end to keep up on the trail. One is get your suspension setup checked out by a suspension shop. It should include both shocks and forks, springs and valving. The second is to make sure it's jetted properly so you take full advantage of the bottom and mid range rpms. I mean no flat spots and stuttering. A JD kit should help you out with that. If you have compatible rubber for the area you ride, the new suspension will keep you tracking with less effort and the jetting will allow you to put more power to the ground (courtesy of a backend that bites like a bear). I ride a KLX 300 with most of my friends on 450's. I'd buy a 450 too-if I didn't have to wait on them during the ride.

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Take comfort in knowing that rider skill is far more a factor than the bike. One of my riding buddies rides an '82 Honda XL250R. He has enough of a skill advantage over me to overcome my equipment advantage in all but a very very few situations. If that's not comfort enough, you'll have to surrender and get a more powerful bike.

I was going to say almost the same thing, befor my brother got his 450 he was on a xr 250 and he kept up with me and alot of others including a cr 500 just about everywhere except wide open and sand hillclimbs. Sounds like you have the desire now with a little time you will be right there!! 😢

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Thanks for the encouragement 😢. Two of my buddies ride CRF 450s Coming off CR 250 two strokes that they have ridden since they were like 13.(25 years ago!!) Needless to say they can pretty much kick my butt! 😢 However like you guys were thinking, riding with them has made me a much better rider in general 😢 :cry:

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Whoya, a couple of things you can do on the chugging end to keep up on the trail. One is get your suspension setup checked out by a suspension shop. It should include both shocks and forks, springs and valving. The second is to make sure it's jetted properly so you take full advantage of the bottom and mid range rpms. I mean no flat spots and stuttering. A JD kit should help you out with that. If you have compatible rubber for the area you ride, the new suspension will keep you tracking with less effort and the jetting will allow you to put more power to the ground (courtesy of a backend that bites like a bear). I ride a KLX 300 with most of my friends on 450's. I'd buy a 450 too-if I didn't have to wait on them during the ride.

Burn, Excellent point, I've had some minor revalveing done to the forks awhile back and have set the sag on the rear, but have'nt paid much attention to the suspension lately. 😢 :cry: As a matter of fact I think I'm over weight for the rear 😢 :cry: according to the manual 200lbs with gear. Factory these bikes are set up for 150lb kids!!

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my 04 yz250f's will spank my 05 yz450f.

But you need to put a 262 kit, a set of hotcams, a good WOT pipe, and airflow mods to do it. Of course when I get around to doing the same thing to the 450 it's going to be game set match. 😢

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I used to routinely race a fella that had a YZ125 in a local Harescramble Series. He'd routinely smoke my butt.

In that case..........It's the rider.

Like it's been said................. on open road you don't stand a chance. Thanks kinda like saying "why can't I keep up with Ferraris with my Yugo." Don't worry about it.

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Select super tight technical trails with lots of slick surfaces and make it a long ride and see what happens... In other words put them in your element...

MSTex

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😢 Gentlemen,

These guys are only forcing you to become a better rider! 😢

Good for you! While they're sitting back and cruzing with their easy HP advantage, you're working hard, pushing your bike and your limits! Pretty soon you're gonna be waiting for them!!!! 😢

Keep it up! Challenge yourself to improve everyday! 😢

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One obvious way that often gets overlooked in keeping up with the big guys is to either be WFO or hot on the brakes. No cruising. Easier said than done. 😢😢

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Or just get a bigger bike and apply all the skills you learned to it and you will smoke them.

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One of my friends rides a WR250 and he is now 42, he outruns most other bikes in the forest, does not matter what cc at all. He also outruns riders half his age without any problems, ofcourse it may help him that he used to be # 1 in Enduro 15 years ago and won a few ISDT (six days) but still, he leaves everyone in the dust on his 250.

Mats

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One of my friends rides a WR250 and he is now 42, he outruns most other bikes in the forest, does not matter what cc at all. He also outruns riders half his age without any problems, ofcourse it may help him that he used to be # 1 in Enduro 15 years ago and won a few ISDT (six days) but still, he leaves everyone in the dust on his 250.

Mats

Key words: "number 1 in enduro" 😢😢😢😢

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Select super tight technical trails with lots of slick surfaces and make it a long ride and see what happens... In other words put them in your element...

MSTex

This is what I am thinking, fight them on your own ground. See how those big bullies fare in close combat. Especially the 650. 😢

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This is what I am thinking, fight them on your own ground. See how those big bullies fare in close combat. Especially the 650. 😢

Well thats one area where I'm having trouble. Narrow single track with slick, snotty, muddy uphill surfaces.As I mentiond those 650s can tractor through at low RPM not even spinning the tire (which means they have better control)

Me on the otherhand, must continually use the clutch to try and control wheel spin and therfore losing momentum which leads to loss of balance. (and me falling over!) 😢😢

Now if I had grown up on the east coast I;d have alot more experience riding in the mud, But here in Southern CA we only get about 14" a year and thats mostly in Jan and Feb. So its not uncommon to have no rain mid march through Oct. ( 7 straight months!)

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I meant to write ISDE, not ISDT, anyway he is still fast as heck, keep practicing just go up a gear or two, low gears ruins traction and speed.

Mats

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"Getting fast" to me means going faster when the going gets slow.

Hope that your buddies are getting lazy, and relying on their horsepower all the time.

You, on the other hand, work on the "little things" that will add up, over the course of a ride. Work on your cornering speeds. Work on braking later and getting on the gas earlier. Work on your line selection. Ride the sides of the trail, instead of the whooped out middle. Get your stamina up, so they are always wanting to stop, you are still ready to go! If you are a sitter, stand up more. If you stand up all the time, work on sitting more. Figure out how to attack the whoops, then drag them through 'em!

Hone your skills (never just go "ride". ALWAYS be working on *something* that will make you better) and you will be amazed at how much "more" you can do with a "lesser" bike.

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