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risks/rewards of riding

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Not really sure how to start this question, but here goes.

Last Christmas my wife decided she wanted our two sons to ride. Growing up she saw her brothers and father riding dirt bikes, and having a blast. In my youth, I wasn't even allowed to look at the neighbors mini bike.... "they are too dangerous" my parents would say. Anyway, the summer before last my brother-in-law introduced my oldest son to his trials bike.... my son had a blast. So, last christmas my wife got a crf80 and crf150 for my 12 and 14 yo sons. After sitting in the parking lot of our local NFS OHV trails worrying a couple of weekends, I bought myself a bike, so that I could at least ride with them. I had serious concerns about the wisdom of the direction we were leading the boys.... worried about their safety. After a year... my youngest son decided that the sport wasn't really for him... he isn't so much of a risk taker. My oldest lives for it.... like he has told me...... riding is what he thinks about all week. He outgrew the 150, so he upgraded to my wr250 and I moved into a crf250x. We have had a blast! A couple of weeks ago, we rebuilt his front forks.... we learned how to make a couple of tools for the job from TT..... and best of all.... the job worked. Needless to say we have spent some quality time together riding and working on the bikes together. How many 15 yr olds get up at 5:30am on a weekend to go out with the dads?

Unfortunately... this past weekend a 14 yr old boy died in an accident at the trail we were at. My son and his friend went into the woods to try to help... needless to say they were very shook up. I'm having a serious guilt trip for having got him into this activity... how dangerous is this sport? does this type of accident happen all the time? i always begin the ride by telling the boys we are here to have fun ... not to get hurt. Stupid, Hurts right. but to be honest with you.... i was thinking broke bones.... not death.

would be interested to hear from some other dads.... or kids!

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Well first off, just to let you know, im not a Dad, this is coming from a 15 year old perspective...

Anyways, here is my spin on it.

Riding is truely what I live for. I was introduced to dirtbikes by my dad when I was 6. Every since then I have been riding and have never stopped. And over the course of 9 years of that I have been riding, I have never gotten in a serious wreck. Nor have I even broken a bone.

I would say that, as long as your doing it for fun(like me) you probally will just continue to have fun.(not get hurt). Keep in mind I always have worn my helmet, chest protecter, gloves, boots..etc. Once racing, showing off, trying to ride outside your riding abilities starts to happen, thats when you start to get hurt.

Larry. 😢

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Raptor... thanks for the post and good advise.... I've changed my original post "dads.... or kids!". thanks! your advise make sense.. and glad to hear you haven't been hurt! keep up the good riding!

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I'd say your a pretty mature 15 year old there Larry. Great advise.

I am a Dad and my son and I have been riding for 3 yrs and except for the normal wear and tear, we've never been seriously hurt. Only heard of a couple major incidents in that time, they were avoidable.

Just keep reminding your son (and yourself), don't ride beyond your ability and don't worry about breaking off from a group that's doing stuff you

don't feel comfotable with.

Try getting your youngest a quad?

Ride on. . .

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As a kid, I was allowed to woods ride on a small trail bike, but motocross was out of the question.

Six years ago, my wife, myself, and my then 7 year old son attended a small indoor supercross event. When the 50cc bikes hit the track, my son looked at me and said, "Dad, I can do that". We both got bikes and have not looked back since. I am by no means the fastest rider in my class, but taking up motocross at 39 years of age, is not the norm......😢 Anyway, I too weighed the pros and cons and decided the rewards far exceeded the risks. I will admit that every time I hear of a mx fatality, I get a lump in my throat, but I also have to factor in the circumstances of the accident. I can also tell you that with some trail riders, there is a false sense of security in woods riding because there are no triples to jump to clear, BUT other dangers are definately there. Trees are very unforgiving when you hit one.

The bottom line is that people have been life-flighted out of my area OHV, just as they have from my areas mx tracks. Fortunately, those instances are very rare, but dirt biking in any form does posses a certain risk factor.

That being said, the best advice that I can give you is this:

1. Learn to ride smart first.The speed and skill will come in due time.

2. ALWAYS wear the proper protective gear.

3. NEVER ride alone.

4. Develop proper bike maintenance habits.

5. Treat the bike with respect, it will bite you if you don't.

Time will tell what kind of impact this has on your sons desire to ride. I have seen kids quit cold turkey after a serious crash, and I have seen others back on the bike as soon as they can. Keep in mind that they have had fatalities in little league baseball as well as other sports, so try and keep things in perspective. Hope this helps.

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I almost 30yrs young and don't have and kids yet but act like one myself sometimes. Who don't... 😢

How dangerous is bike riding? How dangerous is it to drive your car in traffic or fly in an airplane? I think we tend to sometimes focus on the bad wrecks and crashes and tend to forget about the all the safe ones.

I see & hear fatality wrecks on TV all the time but for the amount of people that drive a car. It's slim to none that have wrecks. 😢 How many wrecks have you witnessed in your life on the HWY or side roads? A bunch I imagine. Although, seeing anything up close as your son did will have a bigger impact on him directly. As it would anybody!

I remember the first time I witnessed a serious car wreck with bodies everywhere. It was an image that I will never forget. It shocked and made me a little nervous.

Think about how much fun yall have experienced riding bikes together. I bet you wouldn't trade it for the world. 😢 So, don't let this event stop that, you know.

Hope this helps easy your mind.

God Bless,

Keep it Down 😢

P.S. That will be $50. I feel like a consoler or something. jk bro... 😢

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Not really sure how to start this question, but here goes.

Last Christmas my wife decided she wanted our two sons to ride. Growing up she saw her brothers and father riding dirt bikes, and having a blast. In my youth, I wasn't even allowed to look at the neighbors mini bike.... "they are too dangerous" my parents would say. Anyway, the summer before last my brother-in-law introduced my oldest son to his trials bike.... my son had a blast. So, last christmas my wife got a crf80 and crf150 for my 12 and 14 yo sons. After sitting in the parking lot of our local NFS OHV trails worrying a couple of weekends, I bought myself a bike, so that I could at least ride with them. I had serious concerns about the wisdom of the direction we were leading the boys.... worried about their safety. After a year... my youngest son decided that the sport wasn't really for him... he isn't so much of a risk taker. My oldest lives for it.... like he has told me...... riding is what he thinks about all week. He outgrew the 150, so he upgraded to my wr250 and I moved into a crf250x. We have had a blast! A couple of weeks ago, we rebuilt his front forks.... we learned how to make a couple of tools for the job from TT..... and best of all.... the job worked. Needless to say we have spent some quality time together riding and working on the bikes together. How many 15 yr olds get up at 5:30am on a weekend to go out with the dads?

Unfortunately... this past weekend a 14 yr old boy died in an accident at the trail we were at. My son and his friend went into the woods to try to help... needless to say they were very shook up. I'm having a serious guilt trip for having got him into this activity... how dangerous is this sport? does this type of accident happen all the time? i always begin the ride by telling the boys we are here to have fun ... not to get hurt. Stupid, Hurts right. but to be honest with you.... i was thinking broke bones.... not death.

would be interested to hear from some other dads.... or kids!

I am not a dad but I am an uncle, my nephew is 4 and has been riding a 03 crf50 that my dad bought for him this fall. It has been some of the best riding I have done all year with him there learning. It is something that brings families together and gives kids a sense of self worth that lasts a lifetime. At least it did for me. 😢

In my opinion the rewards far outweigh the risks. In this day and age any time you can get out and spend quality time with family it is a huge positive for everybody involved. Sure it is safer to stay at home and stare at the TV but it is not the same type of bonding you get with this type of activity. 😢

I have been riding since I was 5. I am 26 now and have been to the hospital twice and the urgent care a couple of times. The worst injury I had was a bruised spleen from the bike landing on me. I was 15 at the time and in the emergency room being prepared for emergency surgery, my dad was really torn up over the whole deal.

I broke my foot when I was about 12. I had only rubber boots on. Not proper riding gear. This has been the only broken bone to this day. 😢

Like anything else the more you do it, the greater the odds are that something bad will happen. The odds are even greater as the envelope gets pushed to the limits.

I ride quite a bit and race some too. I have about 12,000 miles on the street this year and 1000 or so off road on bikes and 4 wheelers. I was ran off the road on my street bike in June. The bike is rare and pretty much totaled so I bought a new one the next week and proceded to put 8,500 miles over the next three months.

Riding is something I love to do, I have given it up a couple times for about a month or two but I am not a happy person without it. Hell it is a form of therapy for me and it is way cheaper than a shrink and probably safer too!! 😢

I am not really good with the whole death issue, I never know what to say. 😢 I will say that I would rather die doing something that I love than sitting at home on the couch, I just can't live life in a bubble. My worst fear is being paralyzed and becoming a burden to my family and friends. This is a subject that most people don't like to talk about. Before a ride I usually think about the risks but as soon as the helmet goes on it is the last thing on my mind. It is weird. I kind of go into a euphoric state.

Enough rambling from me.

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Tree Dodger, there is nothing wrong with having a look at "life" right now, with the experience of that recent event.

I can't, and won't, tell you what to do about riding or not. If you do ride, there is always that chance of death or major injury. Riders offset that chance with practice, safety gear, and knowing where their limits are {and not going too far past them}.

Personally, after riding for over 30 years, I have screwed my knee up pretty good, broke a wrist, broke my elbow joint. My daughter, 14, has been riding since she was 5, no injuries aside from bumps and scrapes. She did break an arm, riding her bicycle. She is a good rider, she has to be urged to push her limits just a little, she enjoys a good trail ride. She has raced junior enduros since she was 6.

That death in Manchester, while not affecting me directly, has rippled through my circle of friends who do know the family.

When something like this happens, I think its only natural to take account of where you are and what you are doing. I know I have. You also have to take into account the riding personality. Sedate trail rider, WFO 100%, somewhere in between?

We will ride, me, my 14 yr old, my 2 1/2yr old when she's old enough. If someone were to choose otherwise, thats their prerogative, and I would never second guess that. Its a personal decision that must be respected.

Robert

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I appreciate your concern. I have 2 boys ages 14 & 6. My 14 year old rides an rm125 and my 6 year old rides a CRF50. I do worry about injuries but I realize anything they do can be dangerous. My oldest son has had more serious accidents ridding his scateboard than his motorcycle. I always make sure we wear all of the proper gear. I also tell my boys that their safety is more important than the bike. I find the time I spend with my boys to be very rewarding. My oldest son and I often take the motorhome to the desert for the weekend. The all day rides are some of the best times we spend together. I think everything in life has "risk" involved. Try to mitigate the risks but don't dwell on them. I figure that my son and I have a strong bond together. Who knows -maybe if we did not ride together he would spend time hanging out with the wrong kind of kids and get into trouble. I think stories like this give us a healthy amount of fear and that is good. It always reminds you to ride safe to take all of the proper precautions but it should not make you stop ridding. We hear about fatalities in car accidents almost daily but most of us still drive. Maybe we just remember to wear our seat belt or drive more carefully.

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Here's another 15 year old. That scares me a bit, having to see a fellow rider pass away. In my eyes, that should be something he should learn from. You didn't quite state how he got killed, but death is death. I think anything in this world can be dangerous, but I think it depends on how you use it. I mean can you really name something that isn't dangerous. I think the Honda commercial states it perfectly...you know the "I wanna ride I wanna ride I wanna ride" that commercial. It says "Riding teaches responsibility, it builds confidence, and confidence builds champions" I must say, I love that commercial. And it's true, if your not a responsible perosn riding a dirt bike...then your going run into some trouble. Without being confident, how will you ever ride? You'll make mistakes. but you'll learn from them. I think dirt bikes indirectly kill people, yes it's a dangerous sport, but sometimes that's what makes it fun. Try new things, and basically take bicycle riding to it's limit. Trail riding is a whole other thing. It brings people together, trail riding isn't necassarily fast paced. It's to get out, and enjoy what the woods has to offer. I think you should really sit down and talk to your kid, and see how he feels about riding. I think it will definately change his mentality, but I really think it will make him a better rider and keep his head up.

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I started riding at 12 in spite of my dad's protests - my mom overruled and let my brother and I get motorcycles. I essentially lived to ride until about age 25. Started racing at 18, tib/fib compound fracture at 19, other scrapes and bruises and injuries through the years but nothing serious until a broken femur at age 31. Riding was huge for me through the high school years; the teenage years were tough and I'm not sure what I might have done and what kind of trouble I would have gotten into without riding and racing. I'm 44 and still riding and racing.

My brother started riding about the same time I did. He simply didn't have much natural ability. He crashed often and hurt himself all the time. He loved it, perhaps even more than I did, but he was just a total hack on the bike. He finally quit when he broke the corner off his femur and his knee no longer works correctly. Honestly, it was obvious he should have quit years before he did. He cartwheeled his bike or tank-slapped off it every time we were at the track.

My oldest daughter started at age 12 and took to it quickly. She enjoyed it for a year, then quit. My youngest didn't like it at first, then got to where she wanted to go all the time, then she hurt her knee the last time out and hasn't joined me again in months. I really treasure the times we've had together (both kids and the three of us), but there were a few crashes that scared me to death. Each kid did an over-the-bars that had me thinking "para- or quadraplegic?" But they were both fine. I'm glad neither one of them was a daredevil or wanted to race. I wish riding would have worked out better for us because it sure would be nice to have that as a relationship-builder for us through the teen years. That was my dream. But I can't force them to like it.

I have a good friend who rides and races. His daughter rode for a while, then quit. His son got started and now lives for it. But he crashes a lot. He seems to have little, if any, fear. No realistic understanding of consequences. He was crashing in the first turn of every race for a while and his dad asked him "what's up with that?" He responded that he decided not to shut off until he was in the lead. It wasn't working. But he kept doing it. He also is the first to try doubles and triples. He slams often and hard and gets hurt. John called me a while back and said "I'm in the emergency room and very upset; they called me by name as I came through the door and asked if it was me or Tommy this time. That's a bad sign, isn't it? When the emergency room staff knows you?"

No matter how much fun they are having when on two wheels, I've been urging him to have his kid quit. Sell the bikes, stop putting him at risk.

I knew a guy that ended up a quadraplegic. I've had friends who knew guys that died. I was at the races in Pueblo years ago when a guy died off a jump right beside the starting line as I sat there waiting for my moto.

Lots of risks. I still ride. Though I've been thinking about stepping away from racing and even hard-core motocross a lot lately. Several guys my age have gotten hurt last year and this year at the races - broken ankles, arms, legs, collarbones. The injuries seem to come easier, are worse, and take much longer to heal. The risk/reward equation is tilting significantly for me.

Of course, skiing and mountain biking and other sports have risks. Kids and adults wreck their knees playing soccer and basketball.

I suggest honestly evaluating your son's ability and sensibility. And realize that, when it comes to going down and getting hurt, it is not "if" but "when" and "how bad". If you're having a lot of fun and the kid is reasonably cautious and just gets scrapes now and then, there's nothing like dirt bikes in general and motocross in particular! But you are the adult and responsible for him; if he doesn't understand and respect the risks and the consequences, you are the one that has to think long term and protect his health/well being. He won't do that. Evaluate it carefully, lay out the consequences of riding over his head for him such as taking away riding privileges if he does something careless, whatever makes sense. If he can't ride safely and within limits, sell it. If he can, enjoy!

I hope that helps . . .

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Tree Dodger-

While no parent should ever have to burry their child, we must acknowledge that it does happen. It seems that when it is “our time”, it is our time, regardless of age. As a father of two, I know the loss of either one of my children would be devastating…but there would be some solace in knowing that they died doing something they loved, whether it was football, dirt bikes, bicycling, or tiddlywinks, rather than from cancer, heart disease, car accident or some other malady that was also beyond my control.

My dad got the dirt bike bug hard in the early ‘60’s, and started out on a Honda step thru 90. I started on a Honda 50 “Mini Trail” in 1965, at the ripe old age of 4. Before he would let us ride, my dad got helmets, boots, gloves, etc. for my brother and I, took us to a vacant lot, had us get “geared up”, then picked us up and tossed us on the ground, showing us the right way to fall in order to minimize injuries. Teaching your kids the right way to ride, or participate in any other activity safely, is the best insurance you can provide.

As I was growing up, we rode in the desert every other weekend without fail. We raced several hare and hounds and endures as well. Those were some of the best times of my life. In my first 16 years of riding, I broke my left collarbone. In those same 16 years, I also played football. Playing football, I broke my left ankle twice, my right ankle once, had surgery on my right knee to remove torn cartilage, my left knee to remove cartilage and repair the ACL, broke all 5 bones in my right hand just up from the finger knuckles, broke ribs three times, had a concussion, lost count of the number of fingers I broke, separated my left shoulder, and broke my left collarbone. Does that mean dirt biking is sagfer than football? Not really.

I quit riding when I graduated from college and started a family. Three years ago, my then 10 year old son developed an interest in bikes. Not riding, but turning wrenches, which led to riding. We got him the right gear, and following in my father’s footsteps, I took him out and taught him how to fall before I taught him how to ride. Then, we laid down the rules. I thought I would share them for anyone who’s interested:

Dad and Garrett’s Dirt Biking Rules

1. We go riding any time Garrett asks, as long as he plays by the rules. (As a general rule, we go out for a couple of hours at least one evening a week after school, and one weekend a month)

2. The rules are: Grades-B’s or better, in all subjects. No detentions or demerits

Chores – All done before he asks to go, without mom or dad reminding him to do them

Bikes – Oil changed, filters cleaned, and chains lubed and adjusted before he asks to go

Gear – Helmets, boots, riding pants, chest protectors, and gloves must be worn at all times, or we go home.

Commitments – All other commitments made to family and friends must be satisfied (helping Grandpa wash the car, helping Mom with the dishes, helping friends fix their bikes, etc.)

3. Repair work: If Garrett’s bike breaks, he has two choices. He can earn the money to pay a shop to fix it, or he can fix it himself. As a little bit more incentive, if he wants to fix it himself, dad promises to help each and every night after work, or all day on weekends. Dad will also buy Garrett whatever tools he needs to accomplish the job, and will match Garrett dollar for dollar to pay for parts. As you might expect, Garrett has not taken his bike to a dealer yet. Our time in the garage is an excellent bonding experience, where he learns about bikes, and I learn about him. He has a full set of Craftsman tools (that I bought), and a roll away tool box that he saved to buy. At 13 years old, he can also explain two stroke and four stroke engine theory, understands the basics of porting, pipe design, cam timing, cooling systems, transmissions, suspension, wheel truing, and who knows what else.

4. Parts-If Garrett wants stuff for his bike (other than repair parts), he must earn it himself. This works out OK since I need extra help doing chores around the house so that we can go riding whenever he wants, and I am more than willing to pay for it (after all, I’d have to pay a gardener, right?)

5. Bikes – Dad will match Garrett dollar for dollar for a new(er) bike.

Garrett’s first bike was a basket case SL70 that we put together for the fun of it. Not because he liked or wanted motorcycles, but because he likes to play with mechanical stuff. He rode that about three times, and decided he wanted more. We bought him an ’81 yz80. He rode that for a while, and decided he wanted more suspension and more power. He sold some stuff, did some extra chores, and managed to scrape together a little over $800.00, then started combing the papers, e-bay, and recycler.com. He found a ’97 CR80RB (big wheel) that we purchased. He has a whole lot more pride and appreciation for the bike since he had to earn it! In recent months, we’ve put a desert tank, GPS, and 105cc “cheater kit” on, we’ve rebuilt the transmission, powder coated the frame, and rebuilt the forks.

Garrett is not a racer… yet. I won’t let him. While he’s a decent rider, he’s got a ways to go yet to be up to bangin’ bars with the fast guys. His goal is for us to race the Adelanto GP next year. He is working on his riding technique, lifting weights, and learning all he can about his scooter. I have no doubt he’ll be ready. I’m not so sure about myself! In the three years that we’ve been riding together, Garrett has fallen several times, but has yet to injure himself beyond scrapes and bruises.

The arrangement we have works well for us, as it did for my father and I. It provides ample opportunity for father and son bonding, teaches Garrett a valuable skill (I worked through High School as a mechanic in a motorcycle shop), and teaches him life long lessons in accountability, responsibility, budgeting, and working for what you want. It’s also a fantastic bonding experience for the entire family.

Yes, off road riding is a risk sport. Yes, it can be dangerous, and yes, you can get hurt…or worse. But from my perspective, and my son’s, the payoff is well worth the risk.

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Well, I had the dubious pleasure of spending this summer considering the very same question. My son has been riding for 4 years. He's had lots of lessons and always wears full gear. At an MX school this summer he endo'd off a jump and broke both his forearms. Fortunately I was gone to the parts store and didn't see it. Or I'd have been right there in the ER with him with a heart attack. Since his summer was pretty much ruined I took several weeks off and we traveled a bit. After much soul searching and many discussions with my wife we decided to continue to support his desire to ride. HIS opinion didn't count, as he is 12 and we are responsible for his health and safety. We are also responsible for his developement, and ultimately the deciding factor was what would we be teaching him if we didn't let him ride again? All sports are dangerous, MX probably more potentially fatal or crippling than most others, but we will continue to let him ride as long as he wants to. Because that's the kind of person we want him to be.

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Dirt biking is a dangerous sport. Regardless of the precautions we take, accidents will happen.

Talk about guilt, as I'm typing this, my girlfriend is lying in hospital following major back surgery. As I have a bike (& she rode a little in her younger days) she got an mx bike and 6 weeks latter while trying a small jump overbalanced backwards and landed on her tail bone.

Two badly ruptured / torn discs latter and she just had a double spinal fusion, which is basically taking bone from her hips and fusing 3 of her vertebrae together (as well as putting spacers where her discs were and some pins etc). 7 days in hospital, 2 1/2 months off work, and not supposed to bend, twist, lift or arch her back for 6 months!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

She is 22 and was the most cautious rider I have ever seen. The jump was tiny, she just landed in exactly the wrong position.

What I am trying to say is take all the precautions you can, but by partaking in this sport you have to be prepared for the consequences.

It has defiantly put the willies up me though, and I constantly debate in my head whether to continue racing (at the age of 32 I have just come back after having nearly 20 years off after badly hurting my back). Anyone, as is the nature of dirt biking, whenever I get out on my bike all these thoughts disappear, and I have the time of my life!

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OK, some good advice here for starters. 😢 Hopefully, my experiences can help you make the right choice for you and your son too. I have two sons, oldest 15, young feller 13. Daniel (15yo) had a QR50 when he was 4, never really got into it until he was about 7 I think, and even then, didn't have (and sorta still doesn't have) good balance or co-ordination on two wheels. This is surprising to me, as he learnt to uni-cycle, and can travel great distances on ONE wheel 😢 His current bike has been gathering dust for maybe 2 years now, he has girls/guitars/going out with friends etc keeping him busy now, which kinda suits me fine, because as I said, he just doesn't seem to have the 'knack' for two-wheelers. No matter how much he ever rode his bikes, I never felt really comfortable watching him ride. I sometimes think that he was only riding to make me happy, although I have never forced riding upon my kids. Recently, I asked him if he would like to sell the bike, and maybe buy a Fender Strat', or a new amp' or something, but he insisted we keep it, even though he never rides it. I think some kids just have natural riding ability, and some don't obviously..... Now, my young guy Brett; he got the QR50 hand-me-down, loved it, then a DS80, loved it, now an RM80, loves it, always wanting to go riding, wants to come to the garage and work on it, clean it, look at it etc. Apart from a few scary moments out riding with him (like him sliding off the seat, feet off the 'pegs, full throttle over a jump, yep, he saved it 😢 JUST) it's been all good. In fact, he has had much worse injuries skateboarding and playing basketball than riding. You are the only one qualified to know whether it's worth continuing his riding, but I know in my heart that if my oldest was to keep riding,he would likely get hurt. His love is music,and i'm proud of the fact that he has taught himself not only guitar, but keyboards, drums, even harmonica. My youngest makes me proud when he roosts through a berm.....I for one wouldn't take his happiness away, although I know how tragedy like you have recently experienced can make you ask 'Is it worth it?' Talk to your son, i'm sure you'll come up with the right answer. BTW, I don't know what your son and his friends saw of the tragedy, but he may need you, or even a counsellor to talk about it with.....All the best, Chris.

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Yes dirtbiking can be dangerous but it can also be the most fun you can have with your clothes on 😢 My son is 5 and I just bought him an 02 Lem MX bike. He's been riding a Honda QR50 since he was 3 1/2 and totally loves riding. If he's not on his dirtbike he's riding his bmx around, it's the sport he's chosen and his self confidence has grown tremendously since he started. He's a total daddy's boy, I've been riding for 25+ years. Would he be into bikes like this if I didn't have one...? That's hard to say but I've had some of my best memories riding with him. He's had one really bad tank slapper crash when he hit deep sand, but other then that all of his crashes have happened while turning too fast. No injuries yet and he doesn't get scared when he does crash....he says "dad, why did I crash?" He has all of the protective gear except boots (he wears hiking boots) but Christmas is coming fast and will take care of that. If this is what your son loves to do don't take it away from him, hobbies keep you out of trouble and focused. Just my two cents 😢

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Not to hijack a very meaningful thread, but boy I want a QR50, none here in the US! Budget wont allow shipping one in....who knows, I might luck out one day!

I want my youngest to start Red and finish Red!

Please return to your normal posts....

Robert

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It's kinda funny this topic has come up as I too have been considering the right time to get my son a bike. I grew up with horses until I turned 13, then with my own money I bought a bike (against my mothers wishes). She always said they were to dangerous, but as a kid I never got hurt on my bikes, however I got jacked up by those stupid horses all the time (oh man the pain). I think it boils down to this, yes there are risks but what doesn't have risks? I personally believe if you teach your kid/s the dangers and teach them to respect the machine then you can alleviate most of those risks. The time spent with your kid/s will be well spent and worth every penny.

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Not to hijack a very meaningful thread, but boy I want a QR50, none here in the US! Budget wont allow shipping one in....who knows, I might luck out one day!

I want my youngest to start Red and finish Red!

Please return to your normal posts....

Robert

Yep, they are a cool little beginners bike, that's for sure. On the right hand side of a QR50, the 'swingarm' is actually just a dummy, all it does is support the exhaust. With a new fabricated exhaust bracket, you can remove the fake RHS of the swingarm, and you have a trick looking single side swingarm mini. 😢 I bought that little bike for $450, sold it about 6 or so years later for $700..... 😢

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