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3 acres to build a track, need YOUR help!

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WEll my fathers freind became very generous and is letting me use his 3 acres to build myself a track since my OTHER private track isnt so private any more and is getting screwed up the butt (its still cool though but getting boring since jumps are are jacked up) My dads freind is going to buy a bike and iam going to show him how to ride and he's been interested since he heard i ride and most guys at my fathers work ride "street" bikes. So, the thing is I have NO IDEA, how iam going to build it on 3 acres of flat land.... Iam looking to put in some nice whoops, some doubles here and there, like one good spaced triple, two or three nice good medium/big jumps, and some nice big berms for roosting.... !!! The other track was pretty much formed with the help of the land... I just added a little dirt here and there.... WELL... I have no idea where to get dirt and how in the world iam going to build up berms and good jumps... 😢 I also need a good site...(if there is such thing) where i could build a layout to somewhat know what iam doing..... ANy of you private track people have any advice or guidance for me??? I was thinking of packing up wood underneath and just building over with dirt so i wouldnt need that much dirt itself.....

Many thanks and help is Muchly appreciated.....

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First and formost you should have him contact his insurance company and take out some insurance. There is a certain type of policy he can get that is relatively cheap and will save his ass big if and when someone gets hurt.

My buddy use's a lot of logs and timbers when he builds his jumps. For almost five years he's been building a track with shovel's and bucket's. He's done quite well all things considered, but this year he got a John Deer so were gonna be able to finish it up and maintain it like a real track.

Don't use too much fill, use something rock solid that doesn't flex or shift and make sure to have plenty of dirt on top, preferably clay for the top & face. (Although clay holds up well it is also very slick when wet.)

http://www.dirtwurx.com/main.cfm?mc=track_build.cfm

Try this, dirt wurx web site has lots of layouts ect......

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You can get free fill dirt alot of the time. Contact some construciton companies and put an add in the paper would be my best guess.

My .02

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5 years!!!!

I was hoping to maybe have a decent track going in 5 months tops... Ill still have to see what i can do about the dirt.... AND find a way to pack up the dirt into jumps!!! Ill i got is a wheel barrel 😢

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O.K.,,,,,

My other buddy Bob has about an acre, he put a sign in front of his house for free fill. Someone dumped him a bunch of clean clay/sand/dirt mix. Then we rented a bobcat for $275 a day and had a track building party. He buried a minimal amount of crap but I do recall one of the better jumps having a 55 gallon drum in it. We also had the luxury of someone who was a good bobcat operater. You could spend half the day just learning how to drive it. Track was done same day and was killer to boot, but were talking arenacross size.

Jumps take a lot of dirt to build. Especially table tops. Large berms take just as much or more than some jumps. Unless you have equipment, you better have a lot of friends, a lot of personal fortitude or low expectations.

Good luck have fun. 😢

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If you see a construction company doing excavating near your track stop and talk to the dump truck drivers. Often they are happy to dump excess dirt close to the job site.

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I have a 5 acre track that incorporates 2 acres of field and 3 acres of woods. I had some good friends of mine help me lay out the track. If you are on perfectly flat ground then it is up to you but if you have any natural terrain then using it wisely will eliminate a lot of work. You also need to pay close attention to water drainage.

1st. Draw up some good ideas.

2nd. Lay it out with stakes and cheap flourescent tape.

3rd. Take a few laps and see about how tight you have the turns, is it wide enough, how is your straights? Etc....

4th. start with a skidsteer of some sort. They really are fast to move dirt and pretty easy to operate for a beginner. You can form your jumps very well with one.

5th. go riding and refine for the next year. 😢

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Round here, when they build a track, they start by digging a pond. You get a ready supply of soil, and if you place the pond and the track well, any water will drain into the pond. Ponds are handy to have around, add a pump and some plumbing, you can wet the track to keep the dust down.

And if the track ever "closes", the propery owner gets to level the soil, and gains a pond!

Robert

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Round here, when they build a track, they start by digging a pond. You get a ready supply of soil, and if you place the pond and the track well, any water will drain into the pond. Ponds are handy to have around, add a pump and some plumbing, you can wet the track to keep the dust down.

And if the track ever "closes", the propery owner gets to level the soil, and gains a pond!

Robert

Good stuff. Yeah, My 5 year track buddy is digging a pond. 😢

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We just started on a small track on three acres. Small is the key word there. First thing we did was drew out the shape of the lot then drew the path of the track.

We grabed some orange road paint, went outside and marked the path of the track and then cleared the trees and shrubs. After making adjustments to some of the turns and straights we broke out the paint again and marked the starting and peak of each jump face and peak and end of each landing.

The track has doubles, tables, whoops, and a step-up. We've finished the whoops section, three of the doubles, three berms, and a couple skip jumps. The only thing that gets a little hairy is how narrow some of the jumps are. I wouldn't go any less than 10ft wide. We have a couple that are about 6ft and if you hit it a little off you'll be landing in the trees.(we're expanding them out to 10ft)

Yeah, we have used logs and junk for filler on some of the jumps but believe me when I tell you it takes a lot of dirt. We have a connection for dirt and somebody to operate the bobcat so we should be back to work after the holidays. Make sure you do all your prep work and have as much dirt as you can before you rent the bobcat.

Have fun and post some pics when you can, we'll probably get some pics or helmet cam video of our track hopefully around feb. 😢

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Round here, when they build a track, they start by digging a pond. You get a ready supply of soil, and if you place the pond and the track well, any water will drain into the pond. Ponds are handy to have around, add a pump and some plumbing, you can wet the track to keep the dust down.

And if the track ever "closes", the propery owner gets to level the soil, and gains a pond!

Robert

thing is here, when water collects like in a pond we get mosquitos.... Its a south Texas thing... 😢

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We used wooden railroad ties spiked together with 18" spikes to start our jumps with.

We stacked them up to give us our jump faces as well. (eg. 6 on bottom, then 5, then 4, etc..) They're holding up excellently and really saved on dirt. We got 'em for nothing as the RR was removing track in an area where I live. They're heavy, prolly took 8-10 per 1/2 ton load.

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thing is here, when water collects like in a pond we get mosquitos.... Its a south Texas thing... 😢

No, the mosquito thing is not only for Texas. Buddy #3 with a track has a creek running through the property right here in northern Illinois. In the summertime you cannot even change gear outside as they would pick you up and carry you away. 😢

Yeah, I guess that is something to consider.

Also the railroad ties are good stuff. 5 year track used a lot of those too. 😢

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O.K.,,,,,

Jumps take a lot of dirt to build. Especially table tops. Large berms take just as much or more than some jumps. Unless you have equipment, you better have a lot of friends, a lot of personal fortitude or low expectations.:

That's no lie! I used to ride on a private track in Colorado. The owner had 8 semi loads of dirt brought in and it still wasn't enough to do everything he wanted for a 3 acre track. Make sure you don't use sand to build obstacles. The owner of the track I rode on supplimented his dirt with silt/sand from an irrigation ditch. It pretty much made it impossible to keep the jumps in good shape.

For sure you will want some equipment. My neighbor did most of the work on the track. He worked at a Bobcat dealer and could get pretty much any equipment he wanted. Even with this advantage, he spent probably one day a month working on it. If you're doing this by hand, plan on spending all your time working on it, or like JohnyOfast said, have low expectations.

Good luck. If you can pull it off, a private track kicks butt. Have fun.

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>> Iam looking to put in some nice whoops, some doubles here and there, like one good spaced triple, two or three nice good medium/big jumps, and some nice big berms for roosting.... <<

Since your dad's friend is going to get a bike and you'll show him how to ride it, obviously he is a rookie. Perhaps you might want to consider not putting in double or triples at first until he gets used to riding and develops a little skill. You don't want him to get hurt by trying to do thing you can do....that's a quick way to lose your new track!

Prepare yourself for a lot of work, but consider the fact that it will help you get into better shape for next year!

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I have no expirience (sp?) building tracks, but I guess you should keep these things in mind:

- Make sure the jumps, landing faces, and approaches are proportioned correctly.

- Try to make some run off space (no cliffs to fall down if you over jump 😢)

- Leave enough space for braking

- Start out small with the jumps, expiriment (sp?) to find the correct steepness. etc on jump faces

- Be sure to add lots of whoops - they are the funnest part of the track!

(And a long straight away for wheelies 😢 )

Might help to draw the track out first, and then use tape to mark out the track. Ride around it a bit, build some, have fun!

Hope your track turns out awesome and that you have tons of fun 😢

Nor

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Same boat with the track. We are going to build one next month and I've checked with alot of guys on this. We decided to go with a professional track builder. I know anyone that has the coordination to ride a bike can run a bobcat or backhoe, but there's alot more to it than dumping dirt. We decided to go with a professional track builder because: the track, on about five acres, will be done in two days, the spacing of the jumps, take offs and landings will be spot on (no trial and error), and water run off can be addressed. We also have numerous trees to knock down. We will use the trees and stumps as filler. We are using a 953 track machine to grade a long slope for our dirt and I got some for free. We are also clearing a "buffer zone" so the track won't be right next the treeline (safety). The drawback---$2,000, but it's done and it's right!!

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