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Rekluse Clutch Install and Ride Review

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Rekluse Install and Ride Report:

Gave Rooster Performance a call: Http://www.roosterperformance.com as I had read here on Thumper Talk that they carry the Rekluse auto clutch (http://www.rekluse.com). After a great discussion with Kelly at Rooster I had him run my credit card and ship me out a unit for my X, as well as the Perch Adjuster. Kelly laid out the pros and cons of adjusting the unit and the advantage of the perch, so took his insight and advice, and glad I did.

Two days later, DHL dropped off the box and having just finished installing my Thumper Racing 270 kit, I was ready to lay my X on the left side and drop in the clutch.

Whats in the box

Open the Rekluse packaging up and everything plus a couple of spares are in the box, other than basic tools and a tube of Loctite everything is included with the unit. Parts are separated, individually bagged as required and labeled.

Wanted to post not only a ride review, but how easy the install really was for those of us TTr’s that might have had concerns about getting into the clutch and putting one of these things in yourself. If you can check the clearance on your valves, you will breeze through the install of the Rekluse unit! Taking my time and photos and all, took me just a bit over an hour to install and be ready to adjust the unit at the perch.

Bike was already clean from doing the 270 kit.

Fuel tank was already off and carb drained so I didn’t have to worry about puking fuel all over the place.

Removed the clutch cable from the lever, insuring the cable was totally slack.

1. Laid the X over on its left side, clutch cover up.

clutch1.gif

2. Removed the rear brake lever. This was easily the HARDEST part of the install, getting that *#%@#$$@# safety clip off the brake peddle bolt behind the frame.

3. Laid some towels around the clutch area, lots of small parts that I didn’t want to play hide –n- seek with inside the motor. Been there, ruined that.

4. Removed the clutch cover, left the bolts in the cover and just set it up on my work bench as is.

5. Removed the pressure plate, dropped the bolts and springs into a baggie for …..well…….I don’t know why. :cry:

stkclutch_out.gif

6. Removed the clutch pack, keeping them in order and stacked.

clutchpackout.gif

7. Removed the clutch pressure springs from the bottom of the basket (two of em) wont be using these either.

stk_clutch_springs_out.gif

8. Once I had the clutch pack out I replaced the steel clutch plates (.055) with the Rekluse supplied units (.040) and the stock fibers remain.

9. Studs and mounting shims are next. These studs are placed into the tongs on the basket in order to align the mounting shims for the Rekluse lower assembly.

rekluse_studs_washers.gif

10. The studs serve two purposes: retain/center the mounting shims and guide the Rekluse lower assembly. Here is the lower assembly getting dropped over the alignment studs.

rek_lower_assmbly.gif

11. Once the lower assembly is down over the studs you remove/replace one by one each of the alignment studs with flat head allen screws, being careful not to shift the shims and let them slide off into the basket (get to start over then!) Then, you torque the lower assembly down.

rek_lower_assm_torque.gif

12. I dropped the “rebuilt” clutch pack back in.

Rek_stk_clutchpack_in.gif

13. Now you drop the throw out spacer ball, followed by the clutch throw-out (needle bearings can be seen in the middle), topped with a throw out thrust washers and the Rekluse wave spring (that’s it in the center of the 2d shot, needle bearings are covered with the thrust washer).

Rek_throwout_needle.gif

Rek_final_before_pres_plate.gif

14. Now the pressure plate. Put a dab of oil in each of the ball grooves and then lay down 3 tungsten balls then one steel ball all the way around. Do this away from the bike, I don’t even want to think about letting those dudes get access into the transmission or…..oh…..and do it over a towel, they don’t roll as far when (not if) you drop one! Carefully place the pressure plate with balls over the tabs in the lower assembly and press down on the plate enough to overcome the wave spring (not hard at all)

Rek_press_plate_balls.gif

15. Hold down the pressure plate and place the top plate over the it and put in three equally spaced screws, and then check the clearance as shown. If the gap is good you can install the remaining screws into the top plate and finish it up or add/remove steel plates to get the required clearance.

Rek_top_plate_clear.gif

That’s about it and honestly that simple.

There is a real thick gasket you use under your clutch cover, so place it down and bolt down your pressure plate and you are set to go, initial adjustment and ride!

Ride Review

I had an EFM brand auto clutch on a previous bike, my Cannondale E-440 and loved it. The nastier it got, the more you loved the auto-clutch function. Bottom line its like having a pro rider work your clutch for you, that simple.

The Rekluse is no different, the nastier it gets and the harder you push off-road the harder you grin with this unit installed. Its beyond sweeet!

First day out it worked as described. Never killed the motor, even with repeated attempts to intentionally kill the motor, the bike just dropped into its idle until I twisted the throttle again.

One trail we decided to take (wasn’t a trail but looked promising) quickly turned to total thick brush over a deer trail. What was neat (didn’t realize until after I did it) is that I was grabbing and lifting wads of branches etc up and away with my left hand and motoring through with the right, stop, repeat over and over. Left hand was never on the clutch! Bob wasn’t impressed.

After about 25 miles of stressing the unit as much as I could (and my bud MxBob60) the clutch started to slip a bit in the lower RPMs, and no amount of perch adjustment would clear it up. Not slipping to the point that I couldn’t ride or even get back to the truck, just enough to notice and not have the snap from the motor. No problem, we were done riding by the point we got back to the truck and the instructions for set up and break in state after 20+ minutes you will need to check the adjustment of the Rekluse unit.

That night in the shop, I laid the bike back over on the left side and checked the clearance of the clutch pack and sure enough I was out of tolerance (.035 - .045 is the range) and the clutch was sitting at about .045-.046. I pulled the pressure plate, swapped one of the Rekluse steel .040 plates for one of the two supplied Rekluse .046 plates and bolted it back together and I was now sitting right at .039-.040, square in the middle of the range. Bolted things back together and Saturday headed back out for another run.

Perfect!

Set the perch adjustment IAW the directions, I set the clutch to engage just above idle and any ??? I had on the previous days run about the clutch simply due to operator adjustment were completely erased on Saturday. Just start off from idle and snap the throttle and instant full engagement. No slipping, just have to be careful you don’t end up purchasing a new rear fender!

:cry:

Come in way to hot into a tight corner, panic stop, brake slide and the bike just drops into an idle. Make the turn, pick a gear and twist the throttle and your gone – and never touch the clutch lever. Nasty goo, rocky root infested hills and trails is where this unit really shows its stuff. You just focus on moving forward and picking your line. Pretty kewl.

Noticed I wasn’t as arm pumped or tired as I normally am after a run either, but I did notice that my jaw was a bit more sore, guess from grinnin’ so hard!

I tell you what --- the X and the E-Start is cheating as it is, but the Rekluse, along with the Thumper Racing 270 Kit….well……..when you’re my age, you leverage as much technology and treachery required to overcome youth, speed and skill, and I need as much help as I can get!

Whatever it takes!

Bottom line, the Rekluse is an awesome unit. If you ride single track snot you have to check one of these rigs out. Build quality is the highest; complete packaging and instructions and my hat off to Rooster Performance for being knowledgeable about the product and the best set up, and of course for getting the order processed and out so fast!

Great Service!

If you are up in the Pac NW and want to try out the Rekluse, PM me and be glad to try and hook up!

HR

:cry:

:cry:

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Sticky Sticky Sticky!! GREAT post, great details. That's the kind of stuff I like to see when I want to look into a part. I give that an 11 out of 10!!! Great work.

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Great write-up!! I do have one question: Do you still use the clutch for up shifts and down shifts?

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Awesome write-up!

I've been thinking about getting one of these, and your post is moving me closer to getting one.

Question:

What about compression braking? Does the clutch completely release when going down hill, or does it work like a Honda Fourtrax and still have some braking?

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Sounds Great! I'm glad it was easy to install. I bought one this winter from a fellow TT'r but haven't installed it yet. No hurry since theres 3' of snow on the ground. March is my work on bikes month.

Did I miss something? Where's the 270 review?

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I used one on my 250R for the end of last season and had no reliabiliy problems. Put about 3 harescrambles and 3 enduros on it as well as lots of practice time. Checked everthing over this winter and all looked good. I do recommend the clutch adj on the small bikes since you need to clutch a lot more to keep them in the meat of the power, otherwise your lap times suffer. I would imagine the clutch adj. is less important on the big 450's. Love mine and intend to use it this year.

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I just pulled up the search function and typed in Rekluse to do a little research on this unit and your post is the 1st one I came apon. :cry:

Great report. :cry:

So as I asked earlier (another thread). If you were spending your own money (not a gift from wify :cry: ) which would you get 1st. The 270 kit or the Rekluse. They are both about the same amount of cash. I am heading down the Rekluse road this March unless someone convinces me otherwise (I dont see that happening though:eek: ) Everything I read is positive.

I ride nasty single track, rocks, roots, muddy roots and rocks. I think the Rekluse is going to me magic for me in those conditions.

And as you said, at our advancing years we can use all the help we can get to keep up with the young punks :cry:

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yzman400, If I was going to do one first, I would do the 270 kit since it's off season and it will take longer. The Rekluse should be quick to put in but you have to send your cylinder in for the 270 kit. I'd rather have the motor work done come spring.

But we all know you're going to do both anyways! :cry:

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yzman400, If I was going to do one first, I would do the 270 kit since it's off season and it will take longer. The Rekluse should be quick to put in but you have to send your cylinder in for the 270 kit. I'd rather have the motor work done come spring.

But we all know you're going to do both anyways! :cry:

Oh I would love to do both. But the money is only there for one this spring. And I think its gonna be a Rekluse.

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So as I asked earlier (another thread). If you were spending your own money (not a gift from wify :devil: ) which would you get 1st. The 270 kit or the Rekluse. They are both about the same amount of cash. I am heading down the Rekluse road this March unless someone convinces me otherwise (I dont see that happening though:eek: ) Everything I read is positive.

I ride nasty single track, rocks, roots, muddy roots and rocks. I think the Rekluse is going to me magic for me in those conditions.

And as you said, at our advancing years we can use all the help we can get to keep up with the young punks :cry:

have to get technical on me with questions.

hmmmm

:cry:

I work less with both mods.

The 270 kit allows me to keep the revs lower, short shift and grunt the bike around = less fatigue, less arm pump, more grins. I dont honestly pull on the bars to get over stuff anymore, just twist the throttle for logs, ruts, nasty rocks I want let the rear deal with. Steep nasty hills, crawl up without "working" the motor as much.

All of these play cause I am not tiny, and honestly not the target rider for this bike and abuse the poor motor and frame! :devil:

Clutch, allows you to focus on the crap and the line vs feathering and not stalling = less fatigue and more focus on the ride and more grins. I loved the auto clutch I had on my Cannondale, and honestly because of the HP it let me ride it faster and have more fun, that thing has beans! Ride longer when you get tired and most likely less mistakes.The nastiness of where you ride, then I see your leaning for the clutch and it would be fantastic.

The clutch action on the stock X is pretty sweet, so if it were me, I would most likely go with the 270 kit first then the clutch. I am beyond extremely lucky and didnt have to make that choice.

I was about ready for a top end anyhow. So the cost offset of a $180 in stock piston and rings and another what, $35 for gaskets....225 or so there you have about 1/2 the 270kit. Larger skirt, and better reliability top end wise as well.

I love em both and you cant have mine!

:cry:

If it was a 450, I would go clutch first, no question.

Becuase of my size and the smoothness of the stock set up I would lean to the extra beans of the 20cc, then the clutch.

You will love either, there is my rationale, feed it into the "it aint worth anything computer" and choose, you cant go wrong! sounds like Al will be getting your $$$ first though, but I agree with DWT, youre gonna get both!

HR

:cry:

:cry:

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As another "seasoned" rider who is looking for ways to save my limited energy resources for riding and not pushing/thrashing on gnarly trails, the other way hot tip that is just as dramatic an improvement as the Rekluse clutch, try using a competition tirals tire. These thing hook up like magic, the nastier the trail the better they work. I prefer the Michelin X-11 Trails Competition in the Tube Type with a heavy duty tube, running 8-9 pound of air These things work far better than ANY knobby on ANY soil type. They aren't cheap, but they aoutlast about 3 knobbies, with little degradation in performance as the knobs round off. They rely on the radial carcass design and the tall, soft sidewall to wrap around any traction on the ground and hook up.

They look wimpy as hell and the rubber is so soft you would think they would get shredded, but the flat out work. With the Rekluse and a trials tire, you can have a ball on tough trails and amaze your friends.

OrbaBill

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As another "seasoned" rider who is looking for ways to save my limited energy resources for riding and not pushing/thrashing on gnarly trails, the other way hot tip that is just as dramatic an improvement as the Rekluse clutch, try using a competition tirals tire. These thing hook up like magic, the nastier the trail the better they work. I prefer the Michelin X-11 Trails Competition in the Tube Type with a heavy duty tube, running 8-9 pound of air These things work far better than ANY knobby on ANY soil type. They aren't cheap, but they aoutlast about 3 knobbies, with little degradation in performance as the knobs round off. They rely on the radial carcass design and the tall, soft sidewall to wrap around any traction on the ground and hook up.

They look wimpy as hell and the rubber is so soft you would think they would get shredded, but the flat out work. With the Rekluse and a trials tire, you can have a ball on tough trails and amaze your friends.

OrbaBill

Yep that is my next mod :)

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IRCs last longer than the Michelins, and the Mich start cracking real fast.

I have been told that the Dunlop Race Program Radial Trials is the tire.

Period.

Found it on one site.

I love my IRC....its like velcro!...people look at me weird what with no knobbie in the back....

But....I dont care.......it works like a champ!

HR

:)

:)

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Yeah, I get lots of strange looks. As far as I know, I'm the only one in the area running one. Got a few guys thinking though. Dick Burlsen was even checking it out last year at the Loose Moose enduro. He commented on how fun a bike the X is. :)

So HR, how about a link to the Dunlop. I thought the IRC was great. I just wanted to try the Michelin.

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