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Hey, I just started the Texas State Championchip Enduro Circuit, and was wondering where I could find an onbaord computer for my bike, and how much I'm gunna need to spend. Thanx

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Hey, I just started the Texas State Championchip Enduro Circuit, and was wondering where I could find an onbaord computer for my bike, and how much I'm gunna need to spend. Thanx

Search Google for ICO Racing and Watchdog Computers (or Dugas Engineering). They can help you out.

You can get all the features you want for about $475, or you can get the basics for about $275, your choice.

Both are good solid computers, but you really have to pay attention to the mounting instructions. There are no shortcuts.

Most experienced enduro riders also use a roll chart holder, and maybe even a watch or race time clock as a backup.

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I have no idea what your requirements are. I installed the Trail Tech computers on our bikes. Install was straight forward and the instructions were OK. $125.00 will get you the computer and the billet protector.

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I have no idea what your requirements are. I installed the Trail Tech computers on our bikes. Install was straight forward and the instructions were OK. $125.00 will get you the computer and the billet protector.
Trail Tech units are good for keeping track of basic info such as time, trip mileage, speeds, average, etc. But it won't tell you where your next possible check is in relation to current position, current average speed, or ability to automatically re-calibrate in real time to match course actual mileage.

As you become more experienced at timekeeping, these are all essential elements.

If you only use it occasionally, Trail Tech is probably a better investment than a full enduro computer. Assuming, of course, that money is an object.

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Hey, I just started the Texas State Championchip Enduro Circuit, and was wondering where I could find an onbaord computer for my bike, and how much I'm gunna need to spend. Thanx

Going to the Caprock race?

Anyway, when I started racing enduros I got a watchdog, pretty simple and gives you all the info you need.

Then I ran across a GREAT deal on a checkmate so I had to have it. Sold the watchdog to my friend. On second thought I should have sabatoged the thing since he beats me all the time.

:cry:

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As you become more experienced at timekeeping, these are all essential elements.

i kinda like the old odometer and digital watch duct-taped to the handlebars trick. heck, i won my class (3rd overall) in c class a couple years ago with an analog watch with a sweep second hand. lol. i zeroed several of the checks, but i did have to look pretty closely to tell which minute the minute hand was on.

i use the trailtech (adjustable odometer), duct-taped watch (for time) and a roll-chart nowadays, racing in A class. maybe someday i'll buy a fancy computer, but not right now.

if you don't have much enduro experience, i would recommend staying with the basics and doing timekeeping by hand until you really understand what is going on. that'll give you a sanity check (or a backup) if your computer misbehaves, or breaks, or you program it wrong, or whatever. i see alot of riders that are completely helpless if anything goes wrong with the computer.

just my .02. probably when i start getting 2nd or 3rd in A class by only 1-2 pts, i'll think real seriously about a computer to help close that gap. right now i have a lot more to gain just by learning to ride faster.

-mark

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Trail Tech units are good for keeping track of basic info such as time, trip mileage, speeds, average, etc. But it won't tell you where your next possible check is in relation to current position, current average speed, or ability to automatically re-calibrate in real time to match course actual mileage.

As you become more experienced at timekeeping, these are all essential elements.

If you only use it occasionally, Trail Tech is probably a better investment than a full enduro computer. Assuming, of course, that money is an object.

Actually the trail tech does have average speed, and indicators as to above average or below, and you can easily readjust the odo, but not automatically. :cry:

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The Trailtech sounds like it wouldn't be useful for much more than an odometer for enduros. With the ICO you program resets and speed changes, and it does the work for you. Maybe for your first season just stick with your stock odometer, a rollchart, and a watch. You'll learn a lot, and then when you decide to spend $450 on an ICO you can forget it all and it will tell you when to go faster or slower!

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i kinda like the old odometer and digital watch duct-taped to the handlebars trick. heck, i won my class (3rd overall) in c class a couple years ago with an analog watch with a sweep second hand. lol. i zeroed several of the checks, but i did have to look pretty closely to tell which minute the minute hand was on.

i use the trailtech (adjustable odometer), duct-taped watch (for time) and a roll-chart nowadays, racing in A class. maybe someday i'll buy a fancy computer, but not right now.

if you don't have much enduro experience, i would recommend staying with the basics and doing timekeeping by hand until you really understand what is going on. that'll give you a sanity check (or a backup) if your computer misbehaves, or breaks, or you program it wrong, or whatever. i see alot of riders that are completely helpless if anything goes wrong with the computer.

just my .02. probably when i start getting 2nd or 3rd in A class by only 1-2 pts, i'll think real seriously about a computer to help close that gap. right now i have a lot more to gain just by learning to ride faster.

-mark

I'm with you there 100%. Not that I'm a great timekeeper, but I learned by the manual method. It was recommended to me by all of the best timekeepers in our club, so I did it. Glad I listened to them, otherwise I'd be burning twice as many checks, LOL!

I have just the opposite problem. I'm an old desert racer. It was all about speed back then. So, I don't usually have a problem with speed. It's just that one burn per day that kills my score. I try to ride just a little hot to avoid the special-test-and-I'm-already-a-minute-behind blues. One burn usually takes you from 2nd in class to 7th in one easy step!

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I have been using the ICO Checkmate for about three years now. I don't know how I raced before without it. It's dependable, accurate, and user friendly. It's not the cheapest computer out there, but I believe you get what you pay for. Check out HTTP:/icoracing.com/. You can down load and print the manual to get an idea of its operations and capabilities.

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I've been using the Dugas Engineering Watchdog for a few years. Most of the guys I race with use them as well; a few use the ICO. The 'Dog is a very well though-out and tough computer for less than $300 bucks. The latest version now has 3 modes: Enduro, GNCC, and Dual-sport. Inputs before a race (resets, speed changes, keytime, etc) are straightforward. I've learned to trust it completely, although I ALWAYS have a rollchart and watch for backup.

For me, the customer service has been good, too The owner of the company, Dave Dugas, is a good guy will answer questions and remedy any problems.

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Get the Watchdog! It does everything the ICO can do except wirelessly transfer your programming to another computer, plus you can mark the checks and it will give you the 3 for free which will keep you from having to calculate the next possible during the 3 miles. It's also about 114.00 cheaper than the ICO.

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The ICO dualsport model is a good alternative to a trial tech. It's sturdy and easy to use. Personally, I think all you really need is an adjustable odo and a watch. When I master time keeping the old fashined way, then maybe I will upgrade to a better computer. The ICO is much more sturdier than my Trail Tech, and since I had problems with the T.T., I would not recommend one. Search the forums of racing organizations like www.ama-d36.org and you can find a good computer cheap.

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