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yanking the throttle in panic situations

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I've noticed that most of my wrecks happen under the following situation: i start to lose control of the bike so i grab the handlebar tighter out of instinct and hold on, accidentally revving the engine. Then the bike takes off and I wreck.

What advice do you have that would help me stop doing this? Is it just practice? I'd like to get over this habit fast since I'm just getting over a broken leg caused by a wheelie attempt getting away from me like this.

Thanks for any advice.

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I've noticed that most of my wrecks happen under the following situation: i start to lose control of the bike so i grab the handlebar tighter out of instinct and hold on, accidentally revving the engine. Then the bike takes off and I wreck.

What advice do you have that would help me stop doing this? Is it just practice? I'd like to get over this habit fast since I'm just getting over a broken leg caused by a wheelie attempt getting away from me like this.

Thanks for any advice.

I'm the opposite. I usually eat dirt when I let off the throttle at the wrong time. Wicking the throttle WFO usually pulls me out of the crap letting off the throttle got me into in the first place. When in doubt, gas it.

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I just started riding last summer and did this a lot at first. By the end of last summer I found myself not doing this so much, so I think more seat time will definitely help.

Another thing I did to prevent looping out is to develop the urge to also grab the clutch when in panic mode. I know I saved it a couple of times by doing that.

Good luck and ride often!

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You might try not over gripping the throttle too much. When you ride street, they teach you to keep you wrist under your knuckles when gripping the throttle. When you loose control and your arms get jerked straight, you actually end up closing the throttle rather than opening it. Keep in mind that almost everyone teaches you to overgrip the throttle in the dirt, which I agree, but this may help you in the mean time until you learn how to control the gas better.

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In my motorcycle courses they teach you to keep your fingers over the clutch.. so basically when I'm riding dirt i keep at least one or two fingers on the clutch just incase, since your bodys first reaction when something bad happens is to CLENCH your fists, and this causes the clutch to come in, therefore saving you from whiskey throttle.

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Thanks for the good tips.

Berkeman: Thanks for that thread; it has some good advice. But after reading it, I was still confused about whether it's preferred to overgrip or undergrip a dirt bike?

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Thanks for the good tips.

Berkeman: Thanks for that thread; it has some good advice. But after reading it, I was still confused about whether it's preferred to overgrip or undergrip a dirt bike?

I don't think it matters. After enough practice, you will gain a sense of a "neutral" position and whipping the throttle open in panic sitations will become an instinct (by choice of course). I find that "whiskey throttle" gets me out of almost any problem i encounter in the SoCal desert. Riding a canyon at speed and pick the wrong path putting you at a 5' drop off? Lean back and get on the gas... See a really bad rutted out drop thats 2' deep and 1' wide? WOT to get across it. In fact, i can't think of a panic sitation that doens't involve opening the gas.. otherwise i would have time to slow down and avoid it, thus making it a "normal" situation.

More experience and the proper stance on the bike will allow the bike to work underneeth you giving you complete control over the controls, and preventing "accidental" input.

Ride more.. you'll figure it out your self.

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Thanks.

Yea, I see how "whiskey throttle" would be good in those situations.

My problem is that whenever it's happening, I'm out of control and falling off the back of the bike. If I was balanced and in control the extra gas wouldnt be a problem.

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Like a few others have said... get used to keeping a finger or two on the clutch. When in trouble, pull the clutch. I think after just a few times of jerking it wide open at the same time you're clutching, you'll quit doing that. It only took a couple of times of making the engine scream before I learned to relax my grip. :cry:

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You're normal. I have done exactly as you. You will learn to clutch, relax your grip generally, and anticipate thottling out of trouble. Be patient, get your weight forward on the bike and stand more. We sit too much when we're learning and that raises the centre of gravity of the bike, making it less responsive to us skinny weaklings. And we sit and hold with a death grip when it gets scary.Get up and get forward on the seat when you're down.You'll learn, but the tips these guys give here are critical to follow. Be patient.

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I used to have that problem (well, I USED to have it MORE than I do now...) and I recently learned something that reduces it quite a bit.

I had always been taught the "over grip/elbows up" technique, but I what i recently learned was that the way you grip the throttle is very important. Instead of reaching over the throttle to grip it, I'm now just lightly gripping the throttle from the outside like I'm shaking a hand.

Now, when I'm positioned on the bike properly, my elbows are up but relaxed and my whole upper body in general is more relaxed and fluid. When I transfer from sitting to standing and back I'm just bending my elbows, but my wrists and hands are staying relatively the same.

I believe the core difference is that the throttle input is more of smooth roll of the forearm, instead of a rocking of the wrist which makes abupt throttle input a little less likely.

That grip also makes it more natural for grip to be at the outside of the hand, making it easier feather in some front brake with the index or middle finger.

--Fillmore

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Like a few others have said... get used to keeping a finger or two on the clutch. When in trouble, pull the clutch. I think after just a few times of jerking it wide open at the same time you're clutching, you'll quit doing that. It only took a couple of times of making the engine scream before I learned to relax my grip. :cry:

I'll second that!!! Working the clutch helps greatly.

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I had been doing the EXACT same thing. Like some of the other people of suggested, the biggest things that have helped me to stop that are:

1) GRIPPING THE BIKE WITH YOUR LEGS - this was big for me

2) Using the CLUTCH for more then just changing gears

-I had to learn to clutch with only 2 fingers (my index & middle finger)while keeping my pinky, 4th finger & thumb on the grip to hold on. This way I could clutch thru rough situations, but maintain a grip on the handle bars.

My $0.02.

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...and actually, same thing for the brake...I only use my middle finger to brake, so I can maintain a grip on the handle bars to retain control over the bike.

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tried gripping the tank while standing and it seems to work pretty d=mn good!!gotta work on my standing stamina,I'm a wussy,always looking to sit

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I was still confused about whether it's preferred to overgrip or undergrip a dirt bike?

it is only good to overgrip the throttle if you like crashing and getting hurt. do not overgrip the throttle. is that clear. let me say that again: overgripping the throttle is in general, bad and dangerous. don't do it. overgripping is the single most dangerous thing you can do.

any questions?

oh, and read fillmore's post again. i'm going to try thinking about it like that when i ride this weekend.

mw

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