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DRZ-S brighter bulb?

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I apologize if this has been covered already.

Are these bulbs a direct replacement? No other modification required?

Thanks in advance.

J

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I have read a lot about lights lately and it is the opinion of the experts that there is not much to be gained by using the higher wattage or "blue tint" bulbs. The lense/reflector is designed for a specific bulb if a specific brightness with the filament in a specific focused location. The "blue tint" (star brights) actually have less light output, they just look whiter. The first thing I would do is check voltage at the headlight (light on) to make sure you have full voltage at the bulb. At least 13 volts. For more light, add another light with a beam focus that meets your needs.

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I have read a lot about lights lately and it is the opinion of the experts that there is not much to be gained by using the higher wattage
Noble the advantage of the PIAA is its not a higher wattage.... Its a standard wattage but they use different gasses around the filament to get a whiter color temp and brighter output. It truely makes a huge difference. Look at the pics DRZOOMN posted in the other post. I think PIAAs claim of 55/60W having equiv light output of a 100/110W standard halogen is about right.

I would agree the cheapo run of the mill "blue" halogens aren't that great. You get what you pay for.

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I have read a lot about lights lately and it is the opinion of the experts that there is not much to be gained by using the higher wattage or "blue tint" bulbs. The lense/reflector is designed for a specific bulb if a specific brightness with the filament in a specific focused location. The "blue tint" (star brights) actually have less light output, they just look whiter. The first thing I would do is check voltage at the headlight (light on) to make sure you have full voltage at the bulb. At least 13 volts. For more light, add another light with a beam focus that meets your needs.

scoll down and check out the pics i posted in the other thread. i agree i'm sure there are blue tint bulbs that just tint, but the piaa xtreme whites do work better. you can see in the comparison pics that the piaa's were able to light up a wider area and you can see more details in the trees. with one bulb the diff may not show as much but i am very pleased with the results of my upgrade on my tiger. as i said in that post all pics were taken with a digital slr with the same exposure time and fstop.

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=212042

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I use Hella 55W/100W H4 clear bulbs. They are noticeably brighter on high beam and not any different on low bean as I would expect.

I tried cheap blue tint bulbs on my car once; they did not last a week before I removed them.

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Noble the advantage of the PIAA is its not a higher wattage.... Its a standard wattage but they use different gasses around the filament to get a whiter color temp and brighter output. It truely makes a huge difference. Look at the pics DRZOOMN posted in the other post. I think PIAAs claim of 55/60W having equiv light output of a 100/110W standard halogen is about right.

I would agree the cheapo run of the mill "blue" halogens aren't that great. You get what you pay for.

I have a PIAA Superwhite H4 in my S and honestly, I cant really tell the diff from the stock bulb. Is it just me?

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I have a PIAA Superwhite H4 in my S and honestly, I cant really tell the diff from the stock bulb. Is it just me?

eh, it's hard to say. i think my bulbs were pretty old and tired and the fact there are two lights maybe makes the difference more noticable. that's why i took the pics, i wanted to see if there really was a diff. for me there was, but like i said, this is on my 98 triumph tiger, not my DRZ.

cheers

droo

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Sonig,

Hard to say. Could be the PIAA Is no different. Could be you have a voltage problem. PIAA sells lights, I don't know if they actually make the bulbs but it makes no difference if they do or not, PIAA is a quality product. Bulbs have a tolerance for light-out put per power input to meet the standards for whatever bulb it is. Manufactures can use the "tolerance zone" to provide more lumens or longer life. But if a bulb is a true H4 (or whatever) the light out-put is going to be with in that tolerance. Again, the best way to make sure you are getting all the light you are intended to have is to check the voltage at the bulb. Light out-put decreases drastically with just a little voltage drop.

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eh, it's hard to say. i think my bulbs were pretty old and tired and the fact there are two lights maybe makes the difference more noticable. that's why i took the pics, i wanted to see if there really was a diff. for me there was, but like i said, this is on my 98 triumph tiger, not my DRZ.

cheers

droo

Good point. I am in the process of puttng in new bulbs in my wife's car (91 Acura). The old bulds are the original Stanly HB1LL (9004 Long Life). I expect just new bulbs will make a big difference. One of the features of long life bulbs is they last so long they give less light as they age.

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I think PIAAs claim of 55/60W having equiv light output of a 100/110W standard halogen is about right.

that is a marketing gimmick. PIAA makes quality products but they have alot of marketing hype to get you to pay their triple price.

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