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xr300 with "legs" versus CRF250X?

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I rode XR300s for years and recently rode an CRF250X. It didn't have the bottom end that my old XR had - but it did have in all the stock baffles. To tell the truth - it didn't make me want a CRF250X - it made me want to get another XR and fix it up. So my question is - for tight woods riding am I too far off here?

I have a set of 45 marzocchi shiver forks - brand new off of a cannondale. Those will go on the front and will bolt right on with CRF triple clamps from BRP.. An Ohlins in the back. I'll probably shorten the fork a tad. Kibble white valves will go in with the 300cc kit. Stock pipe with the magnum krizman insert. I have a 35mm keihin FCR leftover from my old XR, but like the oval bore keihin in the tight stuff (may install accellerator pump on this carb).

In the end, it will have equal to or superior suspenders than the CRF-X. Much better reliability. Better "trail power" with equal or better HP and much better torque - particularly at lower rpms - and remember, "there is no replacement for displacement"! :cry: It will have a shorter wheelbase and tighter rake than the CRF-X and will turn "under it" with ease. Weight will be within a couple of pounds between the two bikes.

If the stroke were longer in the CRF-X and it were more reliable - I would pump it to 300cc and be done with it - but with the short stroke - I don't believe boring it is a good idea.

I was also considered picking up a husky (450 or 510). But it is 15+ pounds heavier than the XR250R and has titanium valves too :cry: In addition, resale on the more exotic, less mainstream bikes isn't the greatest.

I would appreciate comments from anyone who has run an XR with "real suspension" on their XR250/XR300 (e.g. upside down forks in front and ohlins shock, etc.) and can compare/contrast this XR setup with their new CRF250X.

thanks,

jeff

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I used to race XR "250's" and the suspension was always the weak point. I never had the bones to slap some truly good suspenders on the bikes like you're describing, but I did modify the stock stuff quite a bit. The bikes got much better with the upgrades, but began to show other weak areas immediately. With the stiffer spring and damping rates the shortcomings (flex) of the frame and swingarm came through. The bikes would tend to "swap" the back end around more as you pushed harder. I also suffered from ALOT of fork flex. Now, with that said, for riding in the woods it's PROBABLY not going to be a big issue. Heck, a stiffened up stock XR is a mighty good tight woods tool. :cry:

Hmmm, A-loop seat & tank to fix the ergos, quality suspenders, reliable as a rock... could be a good thing!

I love my X and wouldn't go back to an XR, but your project sounds very interesting!

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It may be you are making some assumptions that may not pan out. For example, just because the XR300 has a shorter wheelbase does not mean it will turn inside the CRF250X. The bike my CRF250X replaced was a kdx220 with a much shorter wheelbase (about 1.5 inches or so). Yet the CRF250X turns better even in the tightest switchbacks.

The X's suspension is set up to complement the chassis design - it is an off-road design right off the drawing board - revalved and resprung components from other manufacturer's may or may not perform any better - I'd bet not. I have never ridden a better suspended off-road bike than the X - ever.

C.G. - the X is lower by far - that's why it feels lighter than it is.

Low end power on the X is very good when the free-mods are done - I can loft the wheel at any speed without shifting my weight.

I have ridden the XR300 and was not impressed by any aspect of its performance - when compared to a CRF250X or even the KDX. I'm not slamming the older design, it was good then, just pointing out some differences that are tough to counter by modifying an older design.

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The stock settings on the CRF250X are very good. I have never felt a stock setup that is better off-road. Compliant without being mushy. It was great. When riding with forks that are set up specificallly for my weight and riding style - I have ridden with better suspension - both the ohlins at both ends of my gasgas and my upside down KYBs and my WPs that I previously ran on my XR.

With respect to the frame on the XR frame flexing - it doesn't, although with the wimpy valving and flexy front fork and triple clamp, nobody could tell. With a set of good suspenders and some decent triple clamps it is a different machine. It's too bad that honda never upgraded the suspension on the XR so that more people could see what it was capable of.

With respect to cornering - this has alot to do with rider preference - just like some guys would like a slalom ski and others would prefer a downhill. On off-road bikes you see this preference with guys yanking a link out of the chain and pulling the forks up in the triple clamps. The CRF250X that I rode steered very well, carved and was neutral enough to inspire great confidence. In tight woods, my old XR cornered more sharply but was not as stable - it's a trade-off. I prefer quick steering to stability and don't mind it getting a little twitchy in the whoops as a trade-off.

- jeff

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Sounds like an awesome project. If you do all that to my bike I'll let you ride it and even let you ride my friends 250X to compare. :cry:

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Hey,

one thing I forgot to mention that I should have is the fun factor. Whether or not a one-off bike you build yourself is "better" than another doesn't really matter - there is nothing better than doing it your own way and having the fun and pride of all that goes with it. :cry:

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Thanks - "fun" is exactly what is driving me. I am just putting together a bike that is the most fun for "me" to ride. I don't want to get into to a debate about which is "better" - I did want some feedback from someone who might have the same preferences and experiences that I have (riding an XR that is setup well - and stock suspenders are not included in that equation).

Too bad noone out there makes it. The new sherco 250 enduro motor looks interesting - an e-start 250 that has a longer stroke. The trials version of the motor is around 320cc with an even longer stroke. If they imported enduro with the 320cc piston and crank... maybe, just maybe...

- jeff

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This isnt Jeff D from Gas Gas Fame is it?

It is.......

went to your "web-site"

I dont even think the XR300 is in the same league as a CRF250x in terms of performance and or technology (10 years almost time difference in technology). Both are great bikes, but if your willing to put that kind of $$$$ into mid-90s technology, just think what a fraction of that into the X will deliver.

suspension

power

handling

etc.

I would also offer that the stock X forks would be worth tuning. suspension tuner friend of mine says the stock honda stuff is awful hard to beat performance and tunability wise.

but thats just an old balding mans opinion.......

When you are up this way, or up to Les's you could ride mine.......and its got the 270 kit in it.

HR

:cry:

:cry:

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Is this what you have in mind? Here's one I built in 1987, and updated a few times. It is a very strong XR 280 engine, with a 33 Mikuni pumper carb, in a CR 125 chassis. The rear suspension link has been updated, and Pro Circuit has reworked the KYB suspension front and rear, it run, rides, and handles better than any XR (I've had 8). I've been riding it for 17 years while waiting for the X, and it's still a great bike, but it can't hold a candle to my modified 270 X. It was the cover feature on Dirt Rider magazine in 1988. CR-XRCRFX.jpg

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