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more throttle or guts?

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Let me first say that i'm a beginner at 35 years old and quite abit out of shape with a brand new yz 450f. While practicing at the local track I have realized that alot has changed in the 20 years since my high school Suzuki dr 100 and my college Suzuki 600 katana in 1990. Along with being out of shape and lack of experience, I still have that competative gene in me that wants more everytime I approach that large double or table but realize that I don't have the ability to gun it or have the guts to clear that jump. It's possible for me to somewhat keep up with some others prior to the technical stuff but I find myself slowing down at the approach. To date I can make that very small table and land on the down side of it but anything larger is just intimadating. I also have that family to worry about if I was to get hurt! My main worry is that I will gun it and have poor form while in the air and crash bad or land on top of the double (case it?) and get bucked off and so on. If I am able to make that small table with decent form, is more throttle and guts the answer to the larger technical stuff. Also, I think that I need more seat time to get used to the bike?

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Practice on table tops. They are very forgiving and safe.

Make sure that with your 450 you keep on the throttle ALL the way up and off the jump. Go off a few small one until you can gain your rythem back.

Also remember if better to over shoot than under, so when in doubt either stop or gun it. Hesistation is very bad.

So just work on gaining your confidence and don't push yourself to hard at first.

hope i helped!

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Practice, practice, and then practice some more but please don't ride over your head. Practice with some faster riders and learn from them. I find that alto of the problems that people are having jumping have alto to do with before the jump. For example if there is a corner before the jump and they cant make the jump its because they parked it in the corner and lost all there momentum. The more speed that you carry threw the corners the easier it is to be smooth everywhere elese. Keep a open positive attitude and have fun!!

Troy Vet 140

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I had the same feeling to, I ride with a guy that pretty fast and he hits some crazy jumps that I back out of, but when I ride solo I hit those same jumps. I got to the point where I had to tell myself to ride like if no one is looking. Half the time when I thought my wife or friends saw me make a mistake they were looking the other way. Start of on small jump and start doing small tricks and keep moving up :cry:

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Don't rush it, tnl. Getting better and more comfortable at jumping is neither more throttle nor more guts, IMHO. It's getting better at balancing on the footpegs while riding and jumping small stuff. If you aren't close to 100% balanced on the footpegs at takeoff, then you aren't going to be comfortable jumping longer and higher. You should learn how much to lean forward into the jumpfaces and into the throttle's acceleration at takeoff so that you feel balanced on the pegs at takeoff as you work your way up and out farther on easier tabletops. Take 10-20 or more laps to work your way out a couple feet at a time, and each lap, feel how close you are at takeoff to being balanced 100% on the pegs. When the bike is lifting your body up into the air by just the pegs, you'll start to feel a whole lot more comfortable getting air.

And then, yes, jumping farther becomes more a matter of catching higher gears and adding more throttle. But you still need to be balanced on the pegs at takeoff. Longer jumps are great places to relax, open your hands and stretch out your arms. But only if you feel comfortable and relaxed and centered at takeoff. Stay safe, buddy, and take your time working your way up on stuff.

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Been in the same boat earlier this year, seat time is the only cure. It was 20 years for me and took me most of this last year to get dialed in and get the suspension tuned right. I thought things were right but ran in some nasty pushing when I started going faster. Now that's cured and I'm starting to work on a tripple you have to hit in 4th pinned on my crf450. Luckily it's forgiving because I keep coming up just a bit short. I'm starting to keep up with the fast "kids" just waiting for the day I can out ride them. One day you reach a point and all of a sudden your riding buddy says "Man you got a lot faster". Always remember to ride within your abilities though.

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Practice, and follow your freinds, or someone that is making the jumps everytime. Ridfe behind or just wait, and when he rides by, follow him, match his speed, and keep good throotle all the way off and bam. Also learn the back break trick, it help if you get nose high. ( pull clutch in and hit back brake, brings the nose down). If you endo off a jump, hit the gas, as it will bring the front end up. Sow ehn you want to do it, follow a good rider, some one you trusat will amke it. I didnt read all the replys, so if I am repeating, sorry.

Ryan :)

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Also remember if better to over shoot than under...

I wouldn't take that to the bank. :) Over shooting a short downside on a 30' table by 10' may have you and your bike divorcing each other.

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Don't feel bad, I'm 40 and have been riding/racing for the last 2 years after not racing for 20 years. We have this HUGE 130 foot camel back jump along with many other boubles,triples and table top jumps. Most of the guys(young and fearless) including my 10 year old son clear that camel back all day long. "Dad just stay on the gas" One time I got up over the top, bounced and almost went over the handlebars. I think it's as you get older you take less risks because you know the consequences. I know if I stayed on the gas I could clear it thats whats frustrating. But you know the doubles that I do clear feel good, one in particular I rolled many times but when I committed and did it, it felt GOOD.

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i agree totally with berkeman DONT RUSHIT!!! after you get comfortable on the bike and start feeling confident then start jumping. practice on tabletops first they are very forgiving. then move on to smalll doubles and once you get them youll be set. dont rush into triples or anything like that. my friend did that , came up way short on a triple and broke his back.

14 years old ridin a CRF250R sweet bike! :)

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Your 10 year old is clearing a 130 foot jump? :)

I was wondering the same thing. 10 y/o berkeboy on his KX-85 gets some pretty good air, but not past 100' for sure. :)

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That intimidation is there for a reason. It will only fade with time and experience on the bike. I started riding again at 36 yrs old. It came slowly for me, but I increased much more quickly when I rode within my ability and concentrated on proper technique. Why? I quit getting hurt, that's why!!! It's hard to get saddle time when you're in a cast!

As you gain control over the bike, through proper technique, your concerns will ease up and your speed will increase, guaranteed. Just stay at it and try to ride as often as possible. Think of it as how many tanks of gas you can burn. Get Gary Semics' training manual. It's cheap and has all of his techniques in there. Read it from cover to cover, again and again until you clearly remember all of it. That's where your control will come from. Speed cometh from control.

Have fun and good luck! :)

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I know a kid about that age, I think he's actually younger. He rides at Redbud all the time and he SKIES wayyyyyyyy past 100 feet. It's awesome. He rides a little KTM and kicks butt!

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I know a kid about that age, I think he's actually younger. He rides at Redbud all the time and he SKIES wayyyyyyyy past 100 feet. It's awesome. He rides a little KTM and kicks butt!

We have some 12 year olds here that clear 90-100ft tables no problem on 60s and 80s. I have seen a 50 KTM PRO bike clear a 60ft, the kid is probably 8. Crazy kids!! :)

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