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What does the scott sterring stabalizer do

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No, you gotta turn sometime. LOL It stabilizes the bike, makes riding in sand tons easier, helps if you hit a rock, helps the handlebars from being ripped from your hands. Most people that use a stabilizer say they wouldn't ride without one.

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its too difficult to describe, but depending on the bike, well worth its weight in gold.

I am on an Xr650r and cant believe i ever lived without it. Off the shelf, they are some $600 (with tripple clamp and bars), but knowing what i know now, i would have paid more.

Stearing inputs (yours) are comparatively low frequency sweeping motions on the bars.

The steering stabilizer only removes the violent high frequency inputs from rocks, sandy ruts, and bad approaches to whoops. like magic it is.

the strangest thing is if you have it set up right, you should never notice that its doing anything! example, if its too tight, you will notice your working too hard in the tight single track stuff. but if you back it off just enough, you can hit miles of deep sandy whoops and full throttle while sipping a frappaccino. (ok, i might have exagerated).

go find someone who has a stabilizer and ride thier bike in deep sand. that will give you a taste of what its like.

nk

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It keeps your handlebars from swapping out in most situations, keeps from getting headshake, keeps your back end from running away from you also. It's great in sand, ruts etc. I put one on my '05 crf 450 mainly because I only weigh 135#'s and that bike is a handfull. Believe it or not I actually like on the track too. It's good if you ever land long, in the flats short, you know all the stuff your not supposed to do.Since it's adjustable, you can turn it almost all the way off and you can barely tell it's there. the faster you go, the more rutted it gets, or the more tired you get you can adjust it accordingly. A bit pricey, but I call it cheep insurance. :cry:

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my question is this , how do you set it up right, I have one on my bike and with the pointer at 12:00 or 1:00 its as if nothings there, normal easy steering, but if I go to say 7 or 8:00, my bars feel a strong resistance in the steering, so do you adjust as you ride, as in sand, set it and forget it, I'm not sure Thanks for any help

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my question is this , how do you set it up right, I have one on my bike and with the pointer at 12:00 or 1:00 its as if nothings there, normal easy steering, but if I go to say 7 or 8:00, my bars feel a strong resistance in the steering, so do you adjust as you ride, as in sand, set it and forget it, I'm not sure Thanks for any help

Turn the pointer clockwise till its full hard (lots of resistance when you turn the bars) then back it off 8 clicks. This is the stock setting and were Scotts recomends you run it at 1st till you get familiar with it. With a full summer on mine 8 clicks is pretty much were I am still at. I do go maybe 3 clicks tighter in certain conditions though.

The knob on the left is the low speed adjustment. The right one (under the cap) is the high speed. Most dont mess with the high speed adjustment. The low speed is what you adjust.

Something to remember, the more low speed damping you dial in (more resistance when you turn the bars) the less high speed damping you will have. And vice versa.

And yes after having my first one on my 250X I will never own a bike without one. I love it. :cry:

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do a search in the offroad forum for set up techs. I read it there when i got my scotts and it dialed in really nicely.

buy one, set it up, and love it

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As I ride with one arm, I keep my Scotts almost maxed out and a local shop is working on machining and adapter to put a second stabilizer down on the frame/fork.

In the loong run, the settings are going to be discovered as you ride and figure out what's comfortable for you. My setting is rarely changed unless I'm doing some very slow stuff (slower than I usually am).

It was not only money well spent for me but a necessary feature for me to ride as safe as possible.

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You don't turn it off per se. You just dial it down to where the oil is passing through freely rather than providing any resistance.

I am not sure if it still provides any benefit at all for even high speed movement if it is backed off completely.

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You also must consider suspension setup as well......some riders would rather put the money into fixing your suspension first then a dampner next. I did both and love it, best handling bike I ever owned. Have fun ! JP

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You also must consider suspension setup as well......some riders would rather put the money into fixing your suspension first then a dampner next. I did both and love it, best handling bike I ever owned. Have fun ! JP

I did both as well and love both! The damper helped me not get fatigued to fast because I always had a death grip going. Now I can sit back and relax more when on the gas! :cry:

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.................I am not sure if it still provides any benefit at all for even high speed movement if it is backed off completely.

Yes you still have the high speed damping. The less low speed damping you have dialed in the more high speed you will have. Its a give and take situation.

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