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HELP! Dead Bike???

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Just put my 2000 DRZE back together from servicing the rear suspension....took it our for a nice ride Went for 12 miles, it was working perfect, good power,started and stopped numerous times....Then I traded bikes with my buddy. He got about a mile on my bike when it just stopped. Would not start. It will kind of act like it wants to fire, but wont. It will back fire if you try and crank or bump it. We pulled off the tank and seat to check all the connections, fuel delivery etc....alll looks fine....

Did I just blow the igniter box???

:cry::cry:

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Lets see 2000,,,,, damn I see this coming,,, but lets ask the normal questions first....

Did it make any noises when it stopped running? Did the motor lock up? You say you checked fuel flow.. did you drain the carb,,, make sure no junk is in the bowl? Plugged jets?

How exactly did it "just stop running"..?? Like a key was turned off? Did it sputter, then stop? Describe it for us :cry:

Lastly, out of morbid curiosity,,, Is the stock cam chain tensioner still installed :cry:

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My buddy says it just kind of cut out suddenly. About a minute before, it seemed to sputter a little. He stopped, blipped the throttle a few times, it seemed OK, he motored the rest of the way up the hill, pulled up to our next gate, and it just quit.

I have already been through the dead auto cam chain tensioner. I had to replace valves and pistion. (thanks Suzuki) The motor cranks, and a spins fine....just seems like no ignition, or suddenly the timing is wrong or erratic?. :cry:

Haven't gotten to pulling the plug yet. Gotta try after work today....

Thanks

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Bronco,

California E - hasn't that got the fuel starvation problem from the eco bits that are added? Or am I thinking about the S?

Cheers

Ian

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Check the easy things first. Is the battery making a good connection ? Any plugs that's not making good contact ? Could also be a dirty carb ?

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Check the main fuse at the battery. If it is blown, don't bother trying to replace it until you find the cause. A while back this happened to Trav and it ended up being his rear running light wire had rubbed through and was grounding out on the subframe and blowing that fuse. We replaced the fuse 3 times in about 10 minutes before figuring it out.

I hope it is an easy fix for you.

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The main fuse is one thing we didn't check, just becuase the starter would crank fine, and the occasional backfire led us to believe the coil was still hot.. I'll check for spark and main fuse tonight.

Thanks

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Why would the CDI system be dependent upon battery voltage or connections? The kicker model doesn't have a battery - so we know the system is probably typical with a couple of pickup coils. So why would Suzuki make the system less reliable because some models use a starter motor? I must be missing something?

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the cdi doesnt depend on battery voltage but it does depend on it to complete the circuit.

the kickers have a capacitor in place of the battery.

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So the battery is still required to provide a buffer for the pulsating DC spikes - no? if so, a blown fuse/running engine could possibly cause ignition module failure or maybe hard starting too (based on what earlier posters said implying the blown fuse causes a no-run condition). If you couldn't find the reason for the fuse blowing, like when you're out in the boondocks, you'd be stuck. So... if you carry a capacitor and some wire, you could bypass the battery and get home - maybe even stick in a permanent hidden bypass switch/capacitor to ground - and eliminate the troubleshooting variables while you're out there. All this assumes a kick-starter or a place to bump it tho.

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Unless you bypassed all of the electrical system you would not be able to be sure that the short is not involved still. And if you did bypass it all you'd have a hard time starting the bike :cry:

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Unless you bypassed all of the electrical system you would not be able to be sure that the short is not involved still. :cry:

I think bypassing a disconnected battery would eliminate the vast majority (if not all) of potential fuse-blowing circuit problems you might encounter. What would likely be left would be related to the key/engine-switch and ignition circuit, including the kickstand switch on s models, the tps and the ignition coil. That's a pretty good reduction IMO and one that might get you home.

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Let me get this staight. You have an electrical problem that causes you to melt fuses and you think the solution is to bypass the power source and the fuse?

You would still have the problem that was causeing the fuse to melt...and without a fuse to melt...the next thing to overheat and melt would be a wire or worse...the electronics to the bike.

That is not a solution or even a band aid. It is a failure to understand the problem.

If it is short...locate it and isolate it. If it is bad charging or power regulation...the electronics will be at great risk at either point.

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Let me get this staight. You have an electrical problem that causes you to melt fuses and you think the solution is to bypass the power source and the fuse?

You would still have the problem that was causeing the fuse to melt...and without a fuse to melt...the next thing to overheat and melt would be a wire or worse...the electronics to the bike.

That is not a solution or even a band aid. It is a failure to understand the problem.

If it is short...locate it and isolate it. If it is bad charging or power regulation...the electronics will be at great risk at either point.

You aren't getting it straight. What I'm talking about is a dead bike out in the boondocks and getting home. A starter that won't work because a fuse blows. Many of us ride S models and many like me have kick starters added, or perhaps you may be lucky enough to have room to bump it. Of course you would isolate and repair when you get home to your warm and cozy garage. What I am saying is to isolate the ignition system from the battery system might just get you home - if all it takes is a capacitor and some wire - why not?

C'mon get with the program, Bundy. :cry:

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Well...assuming that the fuse is all that is keeping the bike from running...you could get by that problem by wrapping a fine piece of wire around the legs of the fuse before pugging it back in...but I remain that the problem that causes the fuse to blow should be accertained before trying patch a bike in this manner.

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I think bypassing a disconnected battery would eliminate the vast majority (if not all) of potential fuse-blowing circuit problems you might encounter. What would likely be left would be related to the key/engine-switch and ignition circuit, including the kickstand switch on s models, the tps and the ignition coil. That's a pretty good reduction IMO and one that might get you home.

How does disconnecting the battery and basically replacing it with a capacitor going to eliminate any of the wiring? In order for what you want to do to be effective you would basically have to have a redundant wiring system, for a kicker of course, set up and ready to switch to. Or you may be able to patch together your own that would only have the essentials wired up, but why? If you go through the bother to do all that why risk this happening late in the afternoon and then not having lights that work? And then there are the parts of the electrical system that can't have easily have a redundant back up, they can fail too.

A better idea would be to use logic and knowledge on the trail, track down the problem and fix it or patch over it before going on.

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Because the ignition system is separate from the charging/lighting system you should not need to be stranded if a problem occurs therein. You don't need a redundant system because you don't NEED the battery/lighting system. Why deal with a charging-battery-starter system problem in the field if you don't need to. This whole scenario is not likely ( except maybe with my luck) to happen - this is a hypothetical discussion, but I don't need lights, a battery, or anything else to get to a safe place - all I need is an engine running - maybe you would enjoy removing plastic and looking for frayed wires, disconnected plug-ins, or measuring resistance when the sun is setting and the coyotes begin to howl - but not me! :cry:

And really, as someone who has had, and survived, all sorts of problems way out there with bikes and cars (I carry rope and pulleys and have used them), it is my experience that it is not an easy thing to troubleshoot for worn insulation or any other kind of electrical mishap in the field. Some people here have stated their e-model bikes will run with the battery completely disconnected - the only potential problem as I see it is assuring the correct configuration of the dc ignition system generated voltage, - and that partly what a battery or capacitor does as I recall - thus the capacitor (same as a battery eliminator) to replace the battery function ONLY WITH RESPECT to its purpose as part of the ignition system.

Assuming a recurring blown main fuse (leaving it blown), I would think you could find the right lead from the CDI box and connect to a capacitor and ground and that would be it - you would bypass both the kill switch and the key switch. I plan to find it, label it, and be ready in terms of knowing where and how to connect just in case. Hey, I was a boy scout. :cry:

Maybe some of you have never been by yourself and just needed to get the dang thing going - I have on more than one occasion - to me that is, "the best use of logic and knowledge on the trail ".

Maybe I'm way off here, maybe there is something I'm missing technically in a DR-S setup, but the argument of "fix it right on the trail" just doesn't represent my kind of real world experiences.

Hey, different strokes, I guess. :cry:

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Sorry...but your theory just does not work. The issue would never be the fuse or the battery...and bypassing them would solve nothing. That is the point we are trying to get across to you.

If you bypass the battery and the charging system is not working...it still won't work.

Even if the charging system works and you have a short...it still won't work...because your draining the power that would other wise run the ignition. It just does not work.

As I said before...we have a failure to understand what the problem is.

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Maybe you are right. Perhaps I am assuming incorrectly that the coils providing power to the CDI are separate from the generator - as I have found on other machines. I will need to see a schematic to know for sure.

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