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What would it take... let us register the bikes and ride

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You are a big boy, do what you want. Like I said earlier, its a felony

where I live, shouldn't take a second thought, pull over, deal with it.

Show some respect for the guy doing his job. You put yourself

in the situation to be pulled over, it is by no means harassment from

law enforcement.

You want to link trails & ride on the street? Get a plate like everyone

else who wants to go it does.

I think alot of you guys neglect the fact that you can't register dirt bikes for on road use AT ALL in alot of states: Massachusetts is one, i believe California is another, maybe Hawaii is another. I cannot register my bike. Therefore i must run a risk when i cross a street. Its a real bummer. I wish i could register. I wish i could pay insurance. I refuse to buy a dual sport just to cross the street because its a different type of bike. I like my yz250f. I had my other bike registered for offroad use but i got stopped by an Environmental and got hassled on my buddies land so i figured what good is it to register for offroad anyway, the fine is only 25 bucks- it actually costs more to register it at $35. It would be a good idea for all states to allow some sort of registration for dirtbikes including 2-strokes (if they can be made clean for use similar to the route 2-stroke outboards have taken with high pressure direct injection and efficient regulated oil injection) but i agree they need to be made quiet and tolerable. Lets face it that when cops chase dirtbikes on the road first off they are probably chasing a kid and kids never weigh the consequences of their actions. All meaning that the cop should be the adult and not create a potentially deadly situation with the rider or other cars by pursuing a high speed chase on the road. Trying to stop the kid is one thing, keeping on in a high speed chase is quite another and its too dangerous. Let him go.

I find that most of the cops i know including my next door neighbor automatically label kids on bikes as "punks" anyways- the stereotyping has to stop. I am not a punk but all my neighbors were like "oh my god he got a dirtbike" when i rolled it out of my truck. I was a national honor society graduate in high school and this spring will have my Bachelors degree from Umass Dartmouth- again i am no punk. I try to be thoughtful and not run the bike at odd hours for maintenance or anything like that and have had no complaints. Why cant we normalize dirt bike riding, make them moderately quieter, and all eligible for registration so the general public will accept them and we can stop all this humdrum about bikes on the road. Am i missing something here? Does anyone hear me? I think keeping the "punk"/"outlaw" sterotype only hurts the sport, thats what hurts. Dirt bikes need mainstream acceptance. Years ago harleys were an outlaw bike and stereotyped as such, since they have received mainstream acceptance. Joe CEO now rides a harley to the office. Why cant dirtbikes come to the same level of acceptance? Would it take an act of god? In what states can you actually register a dirtbike to link trails and what are the regulations? Are you insured? :cry: I dont know the laws of all the other States but would like to hear what works in your state or other ideas.

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Therefore i must run a risk when i cross a street.

in california, and most other western states, you are specifically allowed to cross paved roads. you can't ride alongside the road (except here in NV no one cares), but crossing is officially allowed by the law.

mw

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in california, and most other western states, you are specifically allowed to cross paved roads. you can't ride alongside the road (except here in NV no one cares), but crossing is officially allowed by the law.

mw

My Hometown used to have an Ordinance that Allowed Dirtbikers to ride up to 2 or 3 miles on the street to get to a riding area.

Only realy good thing about that town...

What other states are like that?

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You're making a case against your point in one area: Cops are not the culprit - DON'T RUN FROM THE POLICE. The deadly situation is created by the person choosing to run. The police don't make you rip down the road on your dirt bike, and if an officer pulls you over, either be a man and accept responsibility (maybe you'll see a break because of it) or do as you said before - take a trail off the road. As for pursuit policies, that may vary by agency. One thing to consider is whether the subject may have committed a crime, or is it just a kid having fun - discretion, as well as good training and experience enable the officer to make sound judgements in a case-by-case basis. Unfortunately, when the kids run, they make a choice that may result in harm. If the police never address the issue, the public will be up in arms that the kids weren't stopped before they hurt themselves. It's a catch 22 of sorts.

As to registration and what not, I would contact DMV, or talk to the officer next door. In NY, crossing the road is not a problem. Registration can be had in numerous ways, including "ATV" for a dirt bike. Insurance? You can insure anything. All four of our bikes have full coverage on them, and only one of them is street registered.

As was mentioned in the other thread, moderation, common sense and courtesy go a LONG way in doing "what you have to do," if you know what I mean. The police have much bigger fish to fry than some dirt bike rider, trust me.

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You're making a case against your point in one area: Cops are not the culprit - DON'T RUN FROM THE POLICE. The deadly situation is created by the person choosing to run. The police don't make you rip down the road on your dirt bike, and if an officer pulls you over, either be a man and accept responsibility (maybe you'll see a break because of it) or do as you said before - take a trail off the road. As for pursuit policies, that may vary by agency. One thing to consider is whether the subject may have committed a crime, or is it just a kid having fun - discretion, as well as good training and experience enable the officer to make sound judgements in a case-by-case basis. Unfortunately, when the kids run, they make a choice that may result in harm. If the police never address the issue, the public will be up in arms that the kids weren't stopped before they hurt themselves. It's a catch 22 of sorts.

As to registration and what not, I would contact DMV, or talk to the officer next door. In NY, crossing the road is not a problem. Registration can be had in numerous ways, including "ATV" for a dirt bike. Insurance? You can insure anything. All four of our bikes have full coverage on them, and only one of them is street registered.

As was mentioned in the other thread, moderation, common sense and courtesy go a LONG way in doing "what you have to do," if you know what I mean. The police have much bigger fish to fry than some dirt bike rider, trust me.

I was going to reply, but you just said it all. :devil::cry::cry::cry::cry::cry:

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Again, im not out to break the law but i have to bend the rules sometimes to use my bike and participate in the sport. The laws are supposed to be in effect in favor of the general public and i really truly believe the general public would benefit from some two wheeled law changes. But im wondering why if its acceptable on some level to "let it slide" then why do we have to dance in and out of the law rather than have some concrete rules? Excuse me if im not comfortable letting each individual police officer decide whether or not to fry my a$$ for crossing the road or going 50 ft down the street- i also know some crooked cops who are on a powertrip anyways and would love to jump all over that. (Not eluding to the fact that all cops are on a powertrip but some certainly are) Why cant the states put on the books that we have some rights? I was speaking because Massachusetts is pretty tough about the registration and riding in general. If you are stopped, your bike is impounded, you are fined and have to go to court if on road or public land. There is little legal riding though there is some and crossing the road/ linking trails via a small portion of road is not legal. Why must i feel like an outlaw- its partially society and its a fault on alot of riders that they dont get involved in trying to form laws or fight for rights. I find that most americans sit idly by instead of trying to make the laws work for them. The insurance issue is different also because i cant insure it to cover the rider, just the actual bike unlike my streetriding buddies who have road insurance. I'd like to be able to put the bike on the road for short commutes etc. Most of the riding i do is within a 20 mile radius of where i park and the quickest way back to the truck would be by road in case of bike trouble etc. I just want to know what works elsewhere so i can try and write some letters and maybe start a petition about getting some rights here in Mass.

Real quick back on the chase thing, i swear ill leave it alone if you do this is my last comment. Dont neglect the fact that most kids are scared and dont weigh their actions. Cops should be the one to call it quits when it comes to chasing a kid down the pavement. Let him get away- maybe try to ask around and talk to the kid if you can find out where he lives afterwards. Its not the cops' fault that he is doing his job, but take into account that if you chase the kid, he's going to be scared and maybe do something stupid like run a stop sign or dump the bike and people end up dead. Yes the rider is ultimately at fault, but the cop is regardless a catalyst in the accident and who wants to see what may be a good kid who was just scared end up dead or killing someone else. Screw protocol unless it is a fugitive getting away with some bank loot or if he is a criminal making a getaway. Some cops are too hard-nosed because the nature of the job is dealing with people at their worst: domestic disputes, drunk driving accidents, and all sorts of other non-glamorous type stuff as you know but most often the kid on the bike is not the bad guy (as it seems YOU nut know).

Sorry for being so long winded but this is the most thinking ive done in weeks because im stuck in the house with 2nd-3rd degree burns on my hand from an accident. This forum atleast is keeping my mind limber. :cry:

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Ouch! Sorry to hear about your burns, that is for sure a very painful injury. Good luck with your recovery.

I think we can put this one to bed, just about. The cop is no more a catalyst in the chase and impending crash than he is the catalyst in a crime that he investigates. The person is followed by the officer because he is fleeing, period. The absconder chooses flight; there is no room for interpretation. The cop doesn't KNOW whom or what he is dealing with until he investigates. Speaking of which, I've met the most polite people with illegal guns or drugs on them - investigation and a little luck allowed me to do my job in these cases and go home at the end of the shift. My wife appreciates that. So consider that an officer appreciates it when you don't give a reason.

I couldn't agree more that our sport is unfairly represented, and that more readily available registration is in order. Check again on insurance laws though - like I mentioned earlier, we have all four bikes fully insured (including "road" coverage) while only one bike is street legal. Also, I'll bet a cop will fill you in on the specifics of dirt bike/street riding provisions. If I get a chance I'll contact a fellow State Trooper in Massachusetts and see what I can find out. :cry:

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Well sorry for my ignorance of an officer's duties, i guess i never considered some of that stuff. I'm looking from the outside as a citizen and i have strong feelings about some brutish cops that ive encountered in the past (i still dont feel all are bad but as im sure you've heard in the past im just not sold on the idea that all cops are considerate and not on a powertrip either) and imagine that kind of macho thing going on when a kid is being chased. Maybe thats not the case. Ill look into the specific laws around here, i think a state trooper would have a better idea than my neighbor whom ill ask but i ride with 20 different guys and no one knows of any concrete laws and its all very gray area. I'll let you know, thanks.

Im still looking for ideas on what laws and how they work in other states. Thanks all for your replies.

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