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Un freakin believable.....

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So I take my new shiny 05YZ250 out to do a nice easy break in ride today. Do 30 minute warm up. Let her sit then I did about 20 semi fast but not hard laps on the track (about 23 miles or so). Loving the bike working welll....except it starts leaking coolant. So I pack up and come home, wash it up, and add a little over a 1/4 quart of fluid. Start it up and look to see the base gasket puking coolant out below the exhaust flange. :)

I havent even ran a tank of gas through it yet. :)

Im friggin pissed, and its a good thing I wasnt 50 miles into a desert race.

Ill warranty the repair, but this crap shouldnt happen on a Yamaha. KTM maybe, but not Yamaha.

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Shoulda bought a 450!! J/K..... I'd take it right bike to the dealer and tell them to deal with it!!!!!!!!

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I just bought a 2000 yz 250 and so far so good.

I would take it back to the dealer if i was you.

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Four stroke verses two stroke dirt bikes, the numbers alone would lead you to believe that four strokes are twice as good and in this case the numbers are not deceiving. I have been riding two strokes for as long as I can remember. Last year I finally gave in and bought the new four stroke motocross bike, and to say the least I don’t miss my two stroke bike in any way shape or form. Many riders argue that two strokes have advantages in: riding style, handling, and dependability. Having ridden both types, I can state the facts on all of these issues, and in the end the four strokes always come out on top.

When it comes to riding style on the track, the four stroke is superior in every portion, whether it be in the air, corners, or whoop sections. Two strokes have their peek performance RPM in each gear and when you are not in this “power band” the bike is severely underpowered. While four strokes deliver a constant arm pulling power no matter what RPM you are running. Because of these power delivery differences, the four stroke gives a much more balanced feeling in the air, as well as increasing whoop section speeds by eliminating jerking that the two stroke provided.

As far as handling differences goes between the different bikes, the four stroke prevails again. The two stoke had constant problems coming out of tight hairpins because it would always lose power band (unless you were killing your clutch). The four stroke provides a rider with much more torque, allowing you to head into any degree of corner and accelerate out as if you were shot out of a gun without ever even so much as feathering the clutch. Many two stroke lovers contest that the fours have a constant problem with the rear tire constantly washing out. Well, the only conclusion that I can come up with is that these comments were posted by people that have absolutely no idea what they are doing on a dirt bike. As soon as I purchased my four stroke I took it out the track and immediately hit the whoop section over and over again trying to get the rear tire to wash out, and just short of intentionally doing it the bike performed perfect. Once you adjust the suspension to your weight the bike grabs the track as if it were glued to it. Maybe these riders never set up their bikes for their size, because no matter how many cylinders you are running if your bike isn’t set up for you you’re going to experience tire wash out.

Now to the subject that no two-stroke rider could ever argue with me about: dependability. Any way that you look at it the four stroke bike is much more dependable than the two stroke bikes. Four strokes don’t have to be rebuilt after every two or three races like the two-strokes, on average four strokes last five races longer on a set of clutch plates and springs, and they don’t need 121 octane mixed gas to run at full performance.

Overall, I think that four-stroke bikes are the best thing to happen to motocross since trophy girls. They are light powerhouses that are practically bulletproof. Now what more could any rider ask for?

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You must be a yooper to be that big of an *********. Until I am forced to I will not ride a 4-stroke (except my KLX110). I started riding on a 98 400. Since then I've owned 450's and 250F's, I just recently switched to all 2-strokes. You havent railed a berm until you've ridden my bikes. There is no way in hell a 450 could ever corner as well as my 2-strokes do. Sure the 4-strokes have more power and linear power but big deal. For me and for many others the inconsistent power actually works better. I don't give a rat's behind what anyone says, 75% of racing is the rider and that rider needs to be 100% comfortable on what they ride. Whether it's 2-stroke or 4-stroke. If you don't have the skill level as a rider to make that 2-stroke effective in hairpin corners then sure a 4-stroke might work for you. Me I can ride the bike the correct way so I prefer it.

Also I know that as your first post on TT. Just because the name of the site is Thumpertalk doesnt mean you can just come in here and flame on 2-strokes. There are quite a few guys on this site that rode 4-strokes and now switched back to 2-strokes but still post here and wouldnt appreciate this type of post. And because of our 4-stroke knowledge people still appreciate us on the board.

So STFU and welcome to TT newbie!!!! I love harrasing newbie's dont take this post personal. I've become a jerk since I went to 2-strokes. I think it's the premix. :)

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So STFU and welcome to TT newbie!!!! I love harrasing newbie's dont take this post personal. I've become a jerk since I went to 2-strokes. I think it's the premix. :)

You're absolutely correct. You are a jerk. Go tell your Mom that you should be grounded from your bike until you can behave. Premix may be a reason for obnoxious behavior but it is no excuse.

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Boys Boys Boys, two or four strokes.......who cares? I ride both. Point is my brand new super reliable Yamaha is bleeding to death on her first ride. I was just pretty amazed. Didnt mean to start the lame..... I have more strokes than you argument. Im prolly just as fast on this bike as my 450SX.

Just gotta keep the juice INSIDE the motor. :)

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Probably not properly torqued from the factory or could be bad surface on the cases or cylinder. Let the dealer fix it so if it is more than the gasket they can warranty it.

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Man you've had some bad luck lately Cisco! Hope your shop fixes it quickly - maybe you need to stick with your DR - seems to be the bike that has treated you the best!! :)

dp

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i feel for ya man. got my 450 in may and the second day i took it out a pin on in the kick starter assembly broke and the kick started locked up and it chipped one of the case halves. case half was on back order and i was moving in a week so they didn't know when it was going to be done. Month later i get a call from them saying its done so i drive 200 miles to pick it up and i get home and it doesnt run. started up and ran like massive shit then it just wouldnt run. started looking the bike over and the oil drain plug by the shifter was 1/2 way out, front motor mount didnt even have the bolt in it, missing 2 of the bolts for my skid plate and the stator wasnt bolted down so the timing was all f'd up. so i bring the bike back down to the dealer, thankfully they have 2 dealers and the other one was only 80 miles away. get it back a week later and the seal on the shifter is out. by then my 30 day warranty was up and i had less than 2 hours on my "new" bike. :) hopefully your your warranty experience isnt the same disaster i had. good luck man

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Hmmm...I've got over 12 pretty hard hours on my new 450 with zero problems. Great, awesome, incredible bike!!

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Four stroke verses two stroke dirt bikes, the numbers alone would lead you to believe that four strokes are twice as good and in this case the numbers are not deceiving. I have been riding two strokes for as long as I can remember. Last year I finally gave in and bought the new four stroke motocross bike, and to say the least I don’t miss my two stroke bike in any way shape or form. Many riders argue that two strokes have advantages in: riding style, handling, and dependability. Having ridden both types, I can state the facts on all of these issues, and in the end the four strokes always come out on top.

When it comes to riding style on the track, the four stroke is superior in every portion, whether it be in the air, corners, or whoop sections. Two strokes have their peek performance RPM in each gear and when you are not in this “power band” the bike is severely underpowered. While four strokes deliver a constant arm pulling power no matter what RPM you are running. Because of these power delivery differences, the four stroke gives a much more balanced feeling in the air, as well as increasing whoop section speeds by eliminating jerking that the two stroke provided.

As far as handling differences goes between the different bikes, the four stroke prevails again. The two stoke had constant problems coming out of tight hairpins because it would always lose power band (unless you were killing your clutch). The four stroke provides a rider with much more torque, allowing you to head into any degree of corner and accelerate out as if you were shot out of a gun without ever even so much as feathering the clutch. Many two stroke lovers contest that the fours have a constant problem with the rear tire constantly washing out. Well, the only conclusion that I can come up with is that these comments were posted by people that have absolutely no idea what they are doing on a dirt bike. As soon as I purchased my four stroke I took it out the track and immediately hit the whoop section over and over again trying to get the rear tire to wash out, and just short of intentionally doing it the bike performed perfect. Once you adjust the suspension to your weight the bike grabs the track as if it were glued to it. Maybe these riders never set up their bikes for their size, because no matter how many cylinders you are running if your bike isn’t set up for you you’re going to experience tire wash out.

Now to the subject that no two-stroke rider could ever argue with me about: dependability. Any way that you look at it the four stroke bike is much more dependable than the two stroke bikes. Four strokes don’t have to be rebuilt after every two or three races like the two-strokes, on average four strokes last five races longer on a set of clutch plates and springs, and they don’t need 121 octane mixed gas to run at full performance.

Overall, I think that four-stroke bikes are the best thing to happen to motocross since trophy girls. They are light powerhouses that are practically bulletproof. Now what more could any rider ask for?

Right out of "Loony Tunes".

Dude, you're so full of it.

I've blown up two thumpers and have destroyed more clutches in my YZFs than I ever have in my smokers. IMO, thumpers are more maintainence intensive than smokers, and smokers are easier to manuever when you've got endurance in you hands. Thumpers are great when you're feeling lazy and don't want to work for your speed.

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This happens with all the brands Cisco. I can recount tales of the same with new bikes of different brands. The real story is in the support of the warranty. Yamaha will most likely take care of your problems no questions asked.

It will get fixed and more than likely you'll think it's the best bike you've ever ridden.

Hey, it could be worse. You could have purchased a CRF and had valve issues four months in with Honda saying "sorry, but it's out of warranty". How many times have we heard this story from the manufacturer that supposedly produces the best quality bike?

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I have had a YZ250, and could not agree more with gonzo and yzwiley. My friend who bought my old 426 was lucky only to spend 2000 EUR on blown top end.

In fact I consider going back to a smoker again. With my riding, a new piston once or twice a season is enough on a 250, and it is half an hour and cheap. If it blows up totally, it still is way cheaper than rebuilding a 4-stroke.

A smoker is not for lazy Rekluse sunday riders. Maybe that is why I like the thumper... donno.

:)

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Four stroke verses two stroke dirt bikes, the numbers alone would lead you to believe that four strokes are twice as good and in this case the numbers are not deceiving. I have been riding two strokes for as long as I can remember. Last year I finally gave in and bought the new four stroke motocross bike, and to say the least I don’t miss my two stroke bike in any way shape or form. Many riders argue that two strokes have advantages in: riding style, handling, and dependability. Having ridden both types, I can state the facts on all of these issues, and in the end the four strokes always come out on top.

When it comes to riding style on the track, the four stroke is superior in every portion, whether it be in the air, corners, or whoop sections. Two strokes have their peek performance RPM in each gear and when you are not in this “power band” the bike is severely underpowered. While four strokes deliver a constant arm pulling power no matter what RPM you are running. Because of these power delivery differences, the four stroke gives a much more balanced feeling in the air, as well as increasing whoop section speeds by eliminating jerking that the two stroke provided.

As far as handling differences goes between the different bikes, the four stroke prevails again. The two stoke had constant problems coming out of tight hairpins because it would always lose power band (unless you were killing your clutch). The four stroke provides a rider with much more torque, allowing you to head into any degree of corner and accelerate out as if you were shot out of a gun without ever even so much as feathering the clutch. Many two stroke lovers contest that the fours have a constant problem with the rear tire constantly washing out. Well, the only conclusion that I can come up with is that these comments were posted by people that have absolutely no idea what they are doing on a dirt bike. As soon as I purchased my four stroke I took it out the track and immediately hit the whoop section over and over again trying to get the rear tire to wash out, and just short of intentionally doing it the bike performed perfect. Once you adjust the suspension to your weight the bike grabs the track as if it were glued to it. Maybe these riders never set up their bikes for their size, because no matter how many cylinders you are running if your bike isn’t set up for you you’re going to experience tire wash out.

Now to the subject that no two-stroke rider could ever argue with me about: dependability. Any way that you look at it the four stroke bike is much more dependable than the two stroke bikes. Four strokes don’t have to be rebuilt after every two or three races like the two-strokes, on average four strokes last five races longer on a set of clutch plates and springs, and they don’t need 121 octane mixed gas to run at full performance.

Overall, I think that four-stroke bikes are the best thing to happen to motocross since trophy girls. They are light powerhouses that are practically bulletproof. Now what more could any rider ask for?

As a retired pro rider that has qualified to pro supercrosses here is my opinion. That's just silly.

I ride both. The 4-strokes get the job done at twice the displacement and with a considerable addition of weight. They have no advantage over a 2-stroke in loose soil other than any extra horsepower that is associated with being a larger displacement. When jumping any bike over a questionable jump (lets say the kind of jump that you can't afford to overjump) the lighter 2-stroke is much safer if you happen to case said jump just because of the mass involved and also because the 2-stroke is considerably less likely to stall on that kind of impact.

On most tracks I’m hard to beat on my 450 but there are actually some local tracks where I turn a faster lap time on my 125 just because it’s 40 pounds lighter than the beast. I still ride the 450 during most races because I give up just a little too much ground on the start when I’m on the 125. But putting lap times aside the little 2-smoke is usually just more fun to ride than the massive thumper.

Since when does the modern 2-stroke need to end maintenance every month. That's silly too.

4-stokes and 2-strokes are tools of our trade. Each has it's advantages and disadvantages. You pick the right tool for the current effort. If the 4-stroke was better at everything I don't think Reed or Vuillemin would be riding a YZ250 in the supercrosses instead of the 450's that they ride in the outdoor races.

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Well it turns out that the cylinder mount bolt that hides inside the power valve cover was just SITTING there next to the stud. My bike was built at 4PM Friday I guess. The assembly line was heading out for Sake and forgot to put that nut on all the way :)

So its fixed now and Im happy.

I know this happens, its just frustrating.

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