Shifting in air for greater effect

I try to fly nose-down so I can land with the throttle wide open. Once in a while, I over do it. In that almost endo situation, I've found that shifting up another gear before panic revving gives a much greater effect on the attitude of the bike. That surprised me because I haven't seen that mentioned in any how-to videos or books. Play with it and see. It works. Thank you, that'll be .50 cents!

thanks dude, ill try endoing for the hell of it and see if it works... On my brothers bike of course..... hehehehe

Of course I'm not suggesting you go out and endo on purpose. I'm just saying that if you rev the bike after shifting up, it'll bring the nose up more than if you hadn't. That just may keep you FROM endoing some day, and that's a pretty good thing!

I started playing with the technique after I found it by accident one night at the track. I would hit the jump and rev the bike to bring the front end up. Then, I'd hit the jump again and shift up first, then rev the bike. That gave a much bigger response.

When I accidentally flew with the nose TOO low, I would rev, shift, rev to land on the gas and still ready to attack upon landing. That was a pretty exciting discovery for me.

It's just another tool to help control the bike. Controlling the bike is where the safety, confidence, and ultimately, speed comes from.

Up shifting is just allowing the back tire to spin faster which in turn causes the front wheel to come up slightly faster. If you think this will make you faster in the long run your not thinking this through. When you land you will be a gear higher than the guys around you and the bike won't pull on the landing, in fact it will probably bog on a full throttle landing causing you to crash over the bars anyway. If you truly want to go faster learn how to jump properly, work on your body position on take off instead of new fangled ways to try and hurt yourself.

This was your statement

It's just another tool to help control the bike. Controlling the bike is where the safety, confidence, and ultimately, speed comes from.

In reality you aren't controling you bike you are trying to find ways to counter your lack of control on the bike. MIKE

Good tip Sawdaddy. Lots of people do this, but you're right, you don't hear about it much. Incidentally, there is no rule that says you can't grab the clutch and downshift for the landing :) .

Wow, Mike Thompson, Thanks for your insults and hostility. I love you, too!!

Now, go back and read the post again, taking it in context. What I was getting at was NOT that it was faster, but that it allowed you to bring the front of the bike up quicker if you found yourself in an endo situation. Where's all the crap you came up with?

I'll give you the answer, it is within! :)

Heres a little tip that works for me when I just started riding awhile ago and I was doing the whole butt clenching endo thing. I was told that when I go off the launch, I need to look ahead and not at the horizon. I tried that and it works wonders because when you are focusing on the landing, you tend to lean forward some, but when you look streight ahead, your body doesnt tend to lean forward. Try it out, it worked for me :)

My first time out couple months ago (after 20 years out of the game) I found myself in a bad situation: While in the air off of a jump I noticed that I was leaning way too back and in over my head and anticipated the crash to soon follow. I found myself closing my eyes for what seemed like a minute (only a second though):) Don't know why I did it just did! :) Needless to say, I ended up landing on the rear tire doing a short wheelie and somehow recovering :p Learned couple of things: I'm not 20 years old anymore and dam this thing is fast :D

SAWDADDY Thanks for the tip. I do most of my shifting in the air, and never really notice that. You always want to be a higher gear. Less wheel spin on ground, and more controled power. :)

I usually don't overdo the nose down attitude, at least not nearly like Bubba or those guys. Here's a typical jump. Just enough to be able to throttle out hard upon landing. This one was from a race in Tucson, Pima County Fairgrounds, during the BIG GUN series. Notice my elbows are down like loser...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v689/iamsawman/ND.jpg

i only shift in the air when i need to. you shouldnt rely on shifting to pull you out of something because it doesnt always work. instead try to maintain good body position in the air and ive found, that tapping my rear brake in the air also helps alot. yes it brings ur front end down but only down as much as u want it 2 go. ive never really been in a situation where ive had to shift up to try to save myself form endoing but if the time arises[god willing it wont] i will try it. thanks SAWDADDY :)

14 years old ridin a CRF250R sweet bike :)

Good tip Sawdaddy. Lots of people do this, but you're right, you don't hear about it much. Incidentally, there is no rule that says you can't grab the clutch and downshift for the landing :) .

Sure. why not have a smoke while you're up there? :) Sorry guys, I just don't get that kind of air time. It's cool that some of you do though.:p

Here is a situation where a panic rev won't work without shifting. You've just left the ground in second gear, and the bike was tapped out at the take-off. It's a floaty jump with lots of hang-time, but you feel yourself getting pitched forward. You change body position and panic rev, but the motor can't create any additional inertia to the rear wheel because it was already near the rev limiter when you left the ground. You click into third, crank the throttle, and the front end comes up. You hit the ground in third, which is where you want to be because you tapped out second at the take-off.

I watched a local pro grab two gears and panic rev on a botched tripple. For me, shifting and panic reving is a reflex. I don't think about it, it just happens sometimes.

I ate a bad catapolt a couple weeks ago, there was not near enough time to grab a gear when i seat bounced it and it was about 65ft wide. Once it throws you forward, it's hard to get that foot under the shifter.

and how many people here are b or c riders with a single digit number on their plates? just kinda odd i think unless they were in the top 10 for a national amature title. :)

I ate a bad catapolt a couple weeks ago, there was not near enough time to grab a gear when i seat bounced it and it was about 65ft wide. Once it throws you forward, it's hard to get that foot under the shifter.

and how many people here are b or c riders with a single digit number on their plates? just kinda odd i think unless they were in the top 10 for a national amature title. :)

Well, I've never eaten a catapolt, but I bet they don't taste very good. I don't know how people ride where you come from, but around here even novices find enough time to shift between 20-foot doubles. I could probably eat a sandwich on a 65 footer.

Are you implying that someone must be an A rider to give good advice? If so, then someone should tell Berkeman that he doesn't know what he's talking about. Of course, you could always check people's bios to see if you think that they are worth listening to.

Chances are, if you endoed on a seat bounce, a panic rev isn't going to save you.

So far, the only time I've ever actually come kind of close to losing it was in a race at Rocket Raceway. I never drop my nose more than I need to, but on this takeoff, there was a dip right before the ground leveled out (it wasn't a jump, but an uphill that suddendly leveled off while you are in 2nd on the limiter, or cranking it good in third) and I lost all my lift on the front wheel. I endoed down pretty good - it was enough to startle me and cause me to light the bike for all it's 10580 rpm's, but not enough to warrant a bail. It arrested the forward roll of the bike with my increase of about 1500-2000 rpm's, but there is no way I would have had time to delay on the rev at all. As soon as the front lost it's lift, I opened her up. The rear hadn't left the ground yet. Had I spend that quarter second in an upshift, I am convinced I would have been over the bars. A few of the "A" guys had the same problem - a few others didn't save it. They were pretty banged up, cause it was a very fast area.

DethWshBkr- rocket raceway eh? i took a ride last summer down around the three springs area and tried to find that place but couldn't find it. just wanted to check it out. i ride down that way a good bit when it's warm out. you from around there? course i'm pretty sure i couldn't ride my dr650se there but still want to check that place out. heh, anyone ever tried launching a 325 pound dualsport bike :)

Just a reply to the single-digit number post: The places I ride never seem to have big classes running any more. As long as guys aren't running the same number, there's no problem. We're not pros with a ranking system for the numbers. They're just a method of I.D. for the riders. If you've got less than 10 riders in a class, EVERYBODY could use a single-digit. Besides, a one digit number is cheaper to buy than two or three.

Rocket is sweet. The TT northeast ride is taking place at Rocket - see the northeast forum's top sticky for more info!

My avatar was taken at Rocket...this is a nice big KTM 520 in that shot!

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