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05-TE510 Suspension

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I believe in Husky. I trust Husky. I'm keeping my stock bars. they are awesome. I'm keeping my stock carb jetting and needle, works perfect.

Now I was thinking of a $700.00 pro suspension work up on my bike, but no way I have learned my lesson. I trust husky. I would like some input on my settings

I am 260lbs, I ride woods and some open ride areas and some desert. I'm a C rider. The suspension stock is stiff, probably better suited for MX. I dropped the fork compression 3 clicks and rebound 4 clicks softer on the forks and I re set the pre load on the shock to give me about 4"sag. I also dropped two clicks on the shock upper and lower adjust ments

My cureent comments are...the suspension is magical in tight turns and wide fast sweepers in both cases I feel glued to the ground able to go much faster............My DRZ and I washed out lots on little turns and I was skeerd of fast turns on the bike. not so with my husky

Now I would like to soften it up some more for rocks, roots and woods riding but I don't want to loose that safe planted feeling going faster on wide open turns...... so I'll just play with the clickers on the fork a bit more

even though a gasgas rider who has those Marzocchi forks recommended the big suspension job for my 510, I don't want a $700 surprize..I don't want couch potatoe plush dog tired jap WRF type cushy suspension and lose the husky advantage...I trust husky.

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Bob-

After 6 hours on the 510 i am right there with ya.

Heres our problem:

We need to let the suspension break in. We need 10-15 hours on the bike before we will really know where its at. Every hour of riding i play with the clikcers, get it riding great, then in an hour or two later its off again. Thats just the break-in blues.

Once we have 10+ hours--then its time to replace the fork oil (and adjust the valves) and see what we can get. For those rock and root hits a lighter oil -- 5 wt -- with a lower quantity is going to give us some help. If stock is 100mm (just guessing to lazy to go get the manual) then somewhere around 85 or so mm of oil from the top with the fork fully compressed and spring in is going to help out.

For now its just time to keep playing with the clickers and the sag. For sure its frustrating...but its only a couple weekends away from being set-up!

I aint gonna let no one ruin my Zokes with a 're-valve' ..... at least not till i'm done trying the easy cures for the stiffness.

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Right on Brrpr! we're blazing the trail for other 2005 TE-510 owners to come. :)

yup on the valves, my dealer, Dan, said the same: 10-12 hours then I'll be checking the valves. I got a big weekend next week at clear creek, after that the valve check will happen. Right now I need to get my carb back to spec. It's an embarrassment with that JD stuff in there.

I love this bike, I might actually become a rider now.

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Bob,

Brrpr has the right idea about break in, etc, but eventually you can improve the Marzocchi's with a re-valve. The thing is that you want to use someone who does Huskys and not someone who does only Gas Gas as the forks are different spec in many ways and and the bike itself(frame geometry, etc) is quite different. I've ridden... stock, Race Tech and Ace Products Marzocchi's and Ace is the best. Ride thinks highly of LTR, so in the west I would use them. Make sure you have correct rate springs for your weight or all the fiddling is for naught. Always glad to read about how much you like your bike!

Norman

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I just thought I'd let you know that Marzocchi USA has a fix for the Husky fork problems. They say that the forks come with freaky valving stock. MXA also said that Marzocchi cured the forks.

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I've just ordered one, and after talking to some guys who have and haven't had it done, iI've decided to get mine revalved before I pick the bike up.

It was about $ 200.00AU cheaper to get it done when new rather than later.

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thanks guys. I will be working with the stock set up for sometime. messing with suspension is a bit more of an investment, I'm willing to make if the need is proven and the answer seems right. Lots harder to go back to stock suspension if you feel you made the wrong choices un-like jetting, that you can just change it out in 30 minutes if you don't like it.

I wouldn't want to loose some Marzocchi advantages to a shot in the dark re-do......... but then again I'm sure most shops are lots smarter then me on suspension and it would be all be ok, but as with bbbrp, I'm sticking with stock for a while , work with it, learn it and keep reading about others work with their suspension.

marzocchi link

http://www.marzocchi.com/spa/moto/?LN=UK&Sito=moto

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Hey Bob, All the trials and tribulations you've had in the past few days with the Wolf brought to mind a saying we used to have when I worked at the local m/c shop. Whenever someone had a bike they wanted to throw money at, those in the know would reply, "Stock is best, spend your money on tires." Sounds like you've come to the same conclusion.

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Bob and etc,

I finally had the opportunity to test out the new fork oil and dial in the suspension.

All the testing was on my TE450, at Hollister which was somewhat muddy this week but usually hardpack, with many ruts, stutter bumps and sandy washes. But in all, a good test for suspension, because when it is bad it is punishing.

Previously the 05 TE450, though better out of the box then my 04 TE250 was still pretty stiff, especially the forks for off road riding.

But in short I think I have the bike really well sorted and would suggest the new owners give it a try before spending the money and have the shock/fork revalved.

For me: fast C to mid B rider, who rides fairly aggressively but I like the bike smooth because of lack of seat time lately (work, new home, new twins, etc.) and out of usual shape as I run out of steam to early. So setting up the suspension right means less of a work out for me and faster trail speeds. I weigh about 200lbs with gear.

Purely for Off Road.

I mainly focused on the forks. I swapped out the stock 7.5W oil at 425cc for 100cc of 2.5W and 300cc of 5W for a total of 400cc. I did this mixture because the last time I did the 5W fork oil swap on the TE250 it was better but still could have been softer/more plush. So this blend netted a 4.2W oil. The other difference, the 05 TE450 has with the 04 TE250 is the heavier fork springs (.48kg/mm vs. .45kg/mm). The firmer springs allow the forks to ride higher and in the softer part of the stroke and a bit more stroke to eat bumps.

My static fork sag is 35mm and race fork sag 50mm.

What I found best with the lighter fork oil is: 18 compression and 12 rebound. This made the forks much more plush and uses all of the fork travel. Heavier riders might want to put back in the full amount of oil for more bottom resistance.

Once the forks are up to temp, they feel almost soft (just bouncing on them at a stand still) but react very well to bumps and chatter that would have previously up set the forks and bike. I was happy that some of the smaller braking bumps that would normally give me a work out were just glided over.

I will still fiddle a bit more but at this point I am really happy. I finally feel I can ride at the speed I did with total confidence as I was with my previous bike.

As for the rear I set the High speed compression to 8 click out and low speed compression to 20 clicks out. Rebound is tougher to check alone (bike needs to be compressed to get to the adjuster but I think it is nearly backed out all the way. These setting made the rear track much better and very well balanced to the re-set up forks. I have the rear set at 105mm Dynamic (Race) sag, 38mm static sag.

Again heavier guys will likely need to adjust all the settings in a couple clicks but give this a start I think you will be impressed with the difference.

William

Santa Cruz, Ca

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William,

Good stuff! Do you happen to know the 'full amount' for the front fork fluid? I know the manual calls for 100 mm or something but I've always liked the cc method better than measuring air space.

On the air space method....that's springs out fully compressed right? Thanks.

Lee

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Lee,

Yes, the method is correct. I cheated a bit to save time and measured the amount of oil I removed. I drained the oil and pumped it quite a bit get everything out. But I'm sure there is still some remaining oil in there. That is another reason I lightened the oil a bit more then the 5W. On my CR125 I went 400cc of 2.5W but it is a lighter bike with lighter springs (.42kg/mm)

But my approximate goal was to have closer to 100mm of air instead of 80mm as per the Husky manual. I'm getting full travel, which is what I wanted but if I find it bottomes out when the ground gets harder again I will actually check the air gap and raise the oil level a bit.

William

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OK I'm droping the bike off at my local suspension shop. I was gonna try and work with the stock suspension, but what convinced me to take the bike in is I had to crank on lots of preload on that shock spring from my weight 255 lbs to get my 4" sag with all ride gear on. It felt a little hard and a friend who weighs like I do also said he could tell i had lots of preload on the shock...so I need new springs for my weight is the bottom line.

My questions and requirements of my suspension guy will be:

1.) Educate me - what will he do and why?

2.)Set it up for me , my weight and riding areas is ofcourse the marching orders I will give him, but I want to be able to bring the bike back and have him re set it if I find its not quite right - other customers says he does this for them, thats why Im going local.

3.)I am a c rider but I ride a lot, I am a newbie when it comes to suspension. Don't just soften the bike up and give me some changes that any old newbie C rider like me won't notice....I want a quality suspension job, I dont want to lose any of the quality I have and I don't want to be fooled...

I'll report back my results. This shop is a well known established shop and the guy has worked on Husky suspension before, probably not the sachs shock as that is new in 05 I think. he was recommended to me by two gasgas riders who have the same Marzocchi forks and used this shop.

any other questions I should ask him? or comments

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Not to skip Bob's post but somewhat inline. I changed the fluid in my '05 TE450's forks this weekend and heres what I found. William, I pumped out closer to 500 cc's of fluid. Also, the air space was off considerably between the two legs. The left fork leg was dead on at the manuals 3.5 inches and the right had about 4.75 inches of air space! So, I pumped out all that 7.5 and filled with 5W and it's noticeable plusher. Might be a cheap fix some east coast guys. Later.

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Husky123,

Did you set the oil to 80mm as per stock?

Even with my mixture of 5W and 2.5W I feel I still could go a bit softer and will next time try 50/50 5W and 2.5W but will measure the oil height and try 90mm from top.

wit the lighter oil it feel better then stock but still get feedback at low to medium speed (10-25mph) but once I dial up the pace (25mph and up) and ride more aggressively, it really starts to come on its own.

One thing I have notice, thought getting better with the softer forks and other settings. It that the rear feels as if it wants to over steer a bit and I would like it more planted. I can't tell if it is just suspension settings or that I replaced the stock time with an S-12 as new and some of the riding is on hardpack. And maybe what we consider soft or muddy in California others up North or back East would laugh and call intermediate. So maybe I need a IT or HT tire instead. But I have had great results with the S-12 in the past.

Or could it be that I have too much pre-load for my weight on the stock rear spring to get 100mm of race sag? (200+lbs with gear).

William

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Bob

I would like to suggest that you first install shock and fork springs that are matched to your weight. Then go ride the bike for awhile and try different clicker settings. This will give you a better feel for the bikes suspension before bringing it in for revalving. In order for the suspension guy to make it better, he has to know what you want improved.

With your weight, the springs will have to be firmer than stock. The rebound shim stacks will have to be made firmer to control the rebound of the springs. That's their job and they should be matched to work with the springs.

The compression shim stacks are more of a personal preference and are tied to the terrain and your riding style.

YOU should be able to change all of the springs. It isn't very difficult.

Ride on

Brewster

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thanks brewster for the advice.............I'm such a newbie at working on bikes, I get nervous about setting my own sag, feel like I may have over done it and broke my spring......even thgough I'm an engineer and know the spring wont break...still bike mechanics 101 is beyond my experience and I could screw something up and not know it.... I've made lots of progress in my learning to be my own bike mechanic department and I look forward to changing my rear brake pads and checking my valve clearances, but I since got a good tax return check coming, when it comes to suspension, I decided let the pros do it. :)

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OK, guys I do not profess to know everything about suspension but have done a lot of revalving and tinkering myself so I know some. First off get the correct springs for your weight. This is a must. Lots of preload means horrible suspension. Second balance is everything. If you add lighter oil to the forks and make them softer it will feel better but upset the balance. this could cause many things but instability is probably what will happen. Personally I think all of you should send your suspension to Les (LTR) and have him set it up for you. You will not realize how well that money spent was until you do it. Suspension is the single best improvement you can do to any bike. LTR does both ends for $300-$400 and knows the Zoks and Sachs inside and out. I have sent probably 7-10 people his way and he has managed to make them all very happy first try. Super nice guy, knows his stuff and is very reasonably priced. I would rather run bald tires and his suspension than the other way around :)

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Just to confuse things a bit more:

On my '05 TE510 i am now running the forks way down, at the first line on the 3 clamp. At the same time a larger 16 tooth counter sprocket has the rear wheel pulled far forward--as far as it will go without rubbing.

Now my forks are working great, the rear shock is dead on. The bike's front was harsh before--which i countered by clicking back a bit--but that left me with a bike that was snow plowing on de-accelleration (in part do the extreme engine breaking).....anyway with the forks up, and the rear wheel in....its all come together. It is very very very well balanced.

There is still a small amount of harshness when i hit a big rock at speed--so i might play around with a lighter oil/lesser quantity--but i wont go past 5 wt for now. Fact is i am so so thrilled with the stock suspension i might not do anything more.....and this from a guy who re-did his XR650R forks 6 times!

Conclusion-

Stock i backed off the clickers 2-3 all the way around. This got rid of some harshness, but left the bike snow plowing at times (pointing forwards-the sag was to high and or the spring rates where off)...now with the forks yanked down and the rear wheel forward the bike is very close to where it needs to be.

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I combined the thoughts and theories from this thread this evening. Dropped out the forks, drained out 400 cc's from each (inverted and stroked and left to sit). The I mixed 2.5w and 5W Silkolene 50/50 and filled with 380 cc's.

I still have to fine tune with the comp and rebound but it is very supple now. Given my weight of 150 lbs with gear on maybe its a bit soft for "normal" sized people. :)

At the same time I dropped the forks down to the upper most line. The handling was very twitchy the way the bike came at 4 lines showing (maybe this was to fit it in the crate). Maybe it was the junk Michelin Enduro III's- I did too many changes at once to know.

The bike now feels planted- steering does what I expect it to and the power gets to the ground. :)

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