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How to check the stator out of the bike.

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Hi everyone.

My bike stopped charging last weekend. Though it was the battery so I changed it but it also when flat.

Bike will run until battery starts to get flat and then it will start to miss and eventually stops running.

Is there any test that I can perform on the stator out of the bike to see if it is ok (ie resistance test, closed circuit test) as I suspect it is faulty. I have many toys for electrical testing and just need some advice on how and what to test.

The stator must have been out of the bike before I purchase it (second hand) as there is a small bit of damage to the stator where it appears a bolt had come out of the magnet case and hit the stator (No gasket on the case-case installed using silicon. One bolt missing from the cup, the hex headed ones holding the cup on).

Hope someone can help.

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it would have been alot easier to check it in the bike.

you can check each yellow lead for continuity to gorund.it should have none.

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Thanks Burned.

I have checked the three wires and all are open circuit (not grounded) and have about 1 ohm between them.

Looks like it may be the charging regulator.

Still glad I pulled it off as I would have never found the missing bolt. Will replace it while it is off.

What is the easist way to check the regulator?

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you can check the diodes.

check continuity from each yellow lead to the red.then switch the probes and check all 3 yellow to red again.

should have continuity one way and not the other.

once you have the stator back in the bike and battery fully charged,start the bike with the stator disconnected.check the stator for ac out put.check all 3 feilds (yellow to yellow).

should have 50 volts easily with just a little rpm.

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Man you are quick Burned.

Had a quick check for loose wires on the regulator while cleaning the bike before putting it back together.

The discharge side of the regulator plug took a lot of force to pull out. Once I got it out I found the black and white wire had fused into the socket.

Would this indicate a faulty regulator or maybe a bad connection. It appears that when I test as you describe, it is open circuit no matter which way I try.

Also Burned, what is a good product to put on the stator (laquor) to recoat the scratch section.

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The discharge side of the regulator plug took a lot of force to pull out. Once I got it out I found the black and white wire had fused into the socket.

pretty common.if you catch early it doesnt cause damage.

Would this indicate a faulty regulator or maybe a bad connection. It appears that when I test as you describe, it is open circuit no matter which way I try.

if it has continuity both ways or has none both ways its bad.

Also Burned, what is a good product to put on the stator (laquor) to recoat the scratch section.

can you see bare copper wire?if so,thats not good.

i dotn think you can "repair" it.

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It is only the edge of the stator (not the wire) where the bolt must have come out with the previous owner. All the wires look fine and it tests ok (out of the bike.

I though I would recoat it before putting it back in.

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This man is quick. Do you have a spy camera in my office.

Thanks for that Burned. If you are ever in Brisbane, Australia drop me a line and I will shout you a few amber beverages. :)

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Before you throw out the rectifier/regulator, check the diodes with a test light. Depending on how you tested it and what instrument you used, you can get false indications. Test yellows to red, red to yellows, yellows to black, and black to yellows reversing polarity That will test all 6 rectifier diodes in both directions. Use a 12 volt battery and a low wattage light bulb. When the engine runs again test the stator AC output as burned said. If things look OK, then test charge voltage at the battery. Check all the connections. The plug to the reg/rect is not the only one that melts.

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Thanks everyone. I have a Fluke multimeter (also have a nice 2 channel oscilloscope-Telequipment DM64 ) and I have tested the combinations as advise. All appear to be open circuit.

Looks like a new regulator for me.

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Ok guys back to square one.

I realised I didn't have the diode button pressed in on the multimeter so it would only give an open circuit.

With the multimeter switched to the correct settings the regulator checks out ok.

HHHMMM what is going on.

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Yes, about 1 minute after I realised what I had done. Thanks for that.

What else can I check?

Do I need to put the bike back together to know for sure.

Did you see my PM? :)

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Yes. Operational tests are about the only thing you can do now and are the most meaningful. Fix what you can on the stator, put it together the see what you have for AC voltage. It is still possible that the only problem you have is the bad connection off the RR you found. If the connection was open, you would get no output to the battery. Check all the connections pos and neg from RR to the bat. Don't overlook the fuse.

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Yes. Operational tests are about the only thing you can do now and are the most meaningful. Fix what you can on the stator, put it together the see what you have for AC voltage. It is still possible that the only problem you have is the bad connection off the RR you found. If the connection was open, you would get no output to the battery. Check all the connections pos and neg from RR to the bat. Don't overlook the fuse.

Not only open,, but high resistance will also cause havoc. Mine did this to me a few months after owning it.. The plug was either faulty at the factory,,or just plugged togeather wrong.. Resistance was high,, arcing eventually occurred,, but an electrical connection was still somewhat present. though with huge resistance.... Things checked out,, till I started looking for the "must be something" answer to my charging woes.... The plug was mostly melted,, and lots of arcing was evident in that connection.. Fixed that 2 years ago,, no more issues with the charging system

:)

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Just like to thank everyone for helping out.

Bike is back together and running fine. It appears to be the bad connection on the regulator that caused the problem.

Just one other question, how much oil should the bike hold if it has had the stator out, clutch out to inspect and new oil filter while at it. It appeared to take closer to two litres instead of the 1.8 litres listed in the manual for oil and filter change.

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Nope,,, still the same amount. 1900ml is a full change with filter after overhaul.

1800ml is a standard change with new filter.

Many folks drop in 2 us qt (1900ml) or 2 L (2000ml) and go. It works just fine.

If you've topped off after working on the bike. and are concerned about how much is in there.. Drain and refill with new oil. It's cheap insurance.

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