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Throttle Screw dependent now?

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After all the rejetting and uncorking, I have become kind of throttle scre dependent. When the bike is cold, I have to crank the throttle screw up high to keep is idling. As it warms up, I begin to notice with clutch in or in neutral that she is racing, so I drop the throttle screw back down. I dont really recall this pre-jet and uncork, but I could be wrong.

Im at sticket rejet, clip 4th position, uncorked, fuel screw out 2.5 turns.

Is that exactly what the idel screw is meant for?

Todd

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That will happen. That DOES happen. I adjust my idle screw when I'm not in the mood to sit on the bike until warm. Sometimes I just sit there on the bike, and whilst warming 'er up think about the trails I'm gonna ride that day and how I'm going to get thru that part I didn't get thru the last time out. :)

Make sense to you? Does to me!

:):p

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this subject was explained better by 250thumper,

the 230 dosent have an rpm excellator when the choke is on, thus making it difficult to start. when you say "fuel screw" do you mean engine idle screw????? (the fuel screw it the small brass screw, the idle screw is the large black plastic screw)

feel free to ask more, it never hurts.

p.s. up-date ur garrage so we can see all ur new mods, i wanna see em.

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the pilot jet is too lean or set too lean for the temp would be my guess.

BTY

Does your cycra hand gaurd restrict the throttle movement ?and did you cut the plastic throttle tube to make them work correctly?

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The idle speed screw has a big black, glove friendly, knob so it can be adjusted at will. Just reach down and change it whenever necessary. I find that after my 4 strokes are up to full operating temps (and beyond) that I may have to turn them down a number of times in the course of a ride, but then, I may see a 6000' elevation change in an average outing.

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