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Oil Inside Ignition Cover....?

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I pulled the two plugs out of my ignition side cover to check valve clearances and some oil was slowly making its way out of the plug that accesses the rotor nut. The last time I pulled an ignition side cover was on a 510 Husky, and the flywheel and stator were in a sealed, dry compartment. Is oil in this compartment normal?

:)

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Do ktms have high stator failure?

The drz's is oil cooled, which I'm kind a glad, I suspect failure rate would be much more frequent if it wasn't. I know a guy who's vstrom stator went out also. IMO the oil cooled stators are a better atmosphere to prolong life, but evidently even they fail as I was a victom to this phenomina.

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Uhhhhhh, wellll not really. Stator failures are fairly common an all motorcycles. Most opinions are, the hot oil bath is hard on the stator. A few motorcycles have external air cooled alternators, like a car, where air is actually circulated thru the alternator. That seems like a good idea for a street bike but not so good for a dirt bike or dual sport. There are pros and cons to every approach I guess.

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Oil isn’t the problem

Its carbon and vibration

The transformer on the power pole in your street

Is oil filed , it will last for many years

But on your bike

combustion residues “ sulphuric acid and carbon”

Work there way into the windings and destroy the thin layer of Enable that insulates the windings

Result ded stator

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Oil isn’t the problem

Its carbon and vibration

The transformer on the power pole in your street

Is oil filed , it will last for many years

But on your bike

combustion residues “ sulphuric acid and carbon”

Work there way into the windings and destroy the thin layer of Enable that insulates the windings

Result ded stator

The stock stator contains 2 layers of epoxy, the first layer is on the wire to keep each wire from shorting with the next. The second layer is on the coils, this layer fills in the gaps between the wires of the coil and coats the outside of each coil. Vibration could be a cause of the outside epoxy cracking, but I have yet to see one that is fractured in that way. The issue is heat, it makes the coils expand and melts the plastic that is around each post before the wire is wound around them. Once the hot wires melt through the plastic, it is in direct contact with the metal of the posts and with repeated heating and cooling cycles, the edge of the post wears away the epoxy coating to ground out the coil. This info is from empirical evidence of rewinding my stator. If Suzuki chamfered the edges of the posts, used a higher heat resistant coating and improved the way it shorts out the extra voltage produced, they would have a stator that would last.

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The voltage regulator works by shorting the stator out.

I have found in a lot of cases the fault starts out as a shorted tern

These couple of turns get red hot and cause the insulation in surrounding windings to fail. The failed section of coil then melts its way through the former shorting the hole thing to ground.

maybe sum one can report back next time they replace a stator.

to see if a section of a coil looks burnt internally

and if there is any oil under the outer layer of epoxy

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