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Sag Adjustment

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Static sag should be set around 100mm.

Lift the rear of the bike until the suspension tops out but keep the rear tyre on the ground. Get an assistant to measure the distance from the rear fender to the ground.

Take 100mm from this measurement and write it down. Next adjust the rear preload until the distance from the fender to the ground, with the bike held upright, matches your number.

Job done, have a beer.

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There are 2 measurements you need to take. Race sag is the first. Measure the amount of travel you use with you on the bike in riding gear. Tighten or loosen the preload to get this amount to around 4 inches. Once this is set, measure the static sag, amount of travel just the weight of the bike uses. This should be around 1 inch. If it is more then 1 inch, your spring is too heavy for you. If it is less then 1 inch, your spring is too light for you.

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Sorry, typed before I thought properly. I descibed static sag and it is race sag which you want to set at 100mm. As I described but sit on your bike for the second measurement which is what dude said.

Iain

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There are 2 measurements you need to take. Race sag is the first. Measure the amount of travel you use with you on the bike in riding gear. Tighten or loosen the preload to get this amount to around 4 inches. Once this is set, measure the static sag, amount of travel just the weight of the bike uses. This should be around 1 inch. If it is more then 1 inch, your spring is too heavy for you. If it is less then 1 inch, your spring is too light for you.

I might be a moron here - but wouldn't a stiffer spring offer less static sag? Or, is it opposite from what it looks on the face because you have less preload with a stiffer spring at race sag, and therefore less reload at static to hold the bike up? It's a serious question, not a dig at Dude... :)

Also, do you all do your measurements at the end of the rear fender, or in line with the rear axle on the side panel? I've heard the end of the fender isn't as accurate because the front end doesn't sag as much, causing a kind of fulcrum/lever effect at the end of the fender (does that make sense?). :)

Last, does anyone ever mess around with sag on the front end? If so, are there settings for that?

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The sag with you on the bike determines the attitude of the bike when ridden.

The static sage is to gage if your spring is too soft or too hard for your weight.

If you are too heavy for the spring, you have to preload the spring alot to overcome your weight, then when you get off the bike, the static sag will be non-existant. The opposite is true if you are too light for your spring. If your race sag is set right, the static sag tells you if your spring is right for your weight. This works the same for the front, but you need to take an extra measurement because of striction and then average the 2 values to find your sag. Now that RaceTech has their spring calculator, you don't need to measure static sag to determine if you have the right spring, you just need to watch it to determine spring breakdown.

Measure from a fixed point on the sub-frame to the center of the axle, never from the end of the rear fender to the ground., That would add in too many variables. Along this line, stand on the bike and don't lift or press on the handlebar to get your race sag.

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How do I se Sag adjustment?

2003 DRZ400S

GEt a belt. :)

Sorry, couldnt resist. I concur with what these guys said. :)

The sag part I have down, now if only I could figure out how to stop that pesky kick up on about the 3rd or 4th whoop. :p

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