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rear shock on my 04

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Hi. Just got a '04 in great condition and I'm very happy with it.

The suspension feels great. But I have a little problem on breaking bumps, and in one part of my track in particular. When I enter at speed it catches the rear and throws the back up, brakey style or me-go-over-the-handlebar style. I'm so happy with the suspension (except at this one point of course) that I don't want to do much to it at all.

I'm not good with suspension but think that It could be helped if I allow a slightly quicker rebound. It feels like it could be that the shock is compressed and on hitting the next braking bump a few feet on, the shock has not had time to extend so it's hitting further down the stroke of the shock then it would normally do on the other single bumps that feel so great when they are taken one at a time.

Does this make sense? Am I on the right track? And is there a high speed setting on the rear shock. Should I leave that alone ?

edit: I did the same track on a nice 03 yz250 which felt bumpier the whole way around and was not noticably better on the rough section. I was impressed with the sheer speed of the yz though !

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How does the bike feel on jumps? Is your technique correct? These may not be the problem, but it's worth asking. Suspension-wise, you don't want to quicken or lighten the rebound damping, you want to increase it. That means turning in the clikcer; just do it two clicks at a time. If the bike feels like it's kicking off of jump faces, combine that with what you're describing, and you know the rebound is too quick as it is.

Hope that helps.

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First, you need to be sure that you have fresh fluids in both ends. Old shock oil will do you no good. I tell a ton of people this and they look at me funny. But, you will never ever get any type of baseline unless you have fresh fluids.

Once you have fresh oil, you can work on your settings. Braking bumps, especially small sharp ones, generally are a place where the high speed damping is working. If there are bigger and more of rollers than they are sharp, the low speed will probably have more effect.

Further, your body position will have a ton to do with it. (too far forward or back, and not gripping the bike with your knees, etc.) Also, the balance between the forks and the shock will also play a huge part in the rough stuff. If your forks are diving (which most stock CRF forks do) then you end up low in the front and high in the rear which gives you the "i am going over the bars feel" on braking bumps. (called "stinkbugging")

Once you get the easy things, above, out of the way, I would bet that you are correct in that your rebound is too slow, which is not allowing the bike to come back up fast enough between bumps (this is called packing). Also, if your compression is too stiff you may get the same situation. If your shock is stock, I would go back to standard settings and work from there. They are an excellent reference point. If you are on the extreme end of things, either way in or out on your clickers, you need fresh fluid badly.

Just some food for thought.

James

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