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So I'm learning how to rebuild/re-valve a shock on my 90 yz250wr and have a few questions about nitrogen pressure. I have access to nitrogen at work so that's not a problem, also made-up a fitting.

1-Should I stick to yamahas spec of 128psi?

2-What type of results would I expect if I increased the pressure?

3-Why nitrogen and not air? my guess is nitro is more stable temp wise yes/no?

TIA

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So I'm learning how to rebuild/re-valve a shock on my 90 yz250wr and have a few questions about nitrogen pressure. I have access to nitrogen at work so that's not a problem, also made-up a fitting.

1-Should I stick to yamahas spec of 128psi?

2-What type of results would I expect if I increased the pressure?

3-Why nitrogen and not air? my guess is nitro is more stable temp wise yes/no?

TIA

1. you can increase pressure within a certain limit,for example my 2002 had 145psi and I went up to 175psi. Make sure you know what you are doing.

2. this will assist your bottoming resistance,

3. yes nitrogen is stable for temp changes, but also does not collect moisture. :)

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being a aircraft mechanic we use nitogen in everything ie:struts ( shocks), tires, accumulators. the reasons is nitogen does not contain as much moisture as compressed air and the ambient temp doesnt effect expansion. So nitrogen is better becuase it won't corrode the internals of the shock and it is more stable at different temps. just my 2 cents

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Nitrogen is not explosive when mixed oil which air is under pressure. So if the bladder was to leak or small amount of oil was put into the bladder when pressurized it could become a bomb.

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