Idaho City 100

Anyone from around here going to, or previously been to, the Idaho City race? I sent in my entry on Saturday. This will be my first time and I'm pretty excited about it.

I went a few years ago and did both days, long loop. It is a butt kicker but it has some of the best trails I have ever ridden in a race. I think I got done around 4:45 PM on Sat and around 3:15 on Sunday and I was on time to all the check ins. The club does a great job, enjoy!!!

Anyone from around here going to, or previously been to, the Idaho City race? I sent in my entry on Saturday. This will be my first time and I'm pretty excited about it.

Oh man.....just seeing the title "Idaho City 100" gets my heart pumping. I sent in my registration Friday and this will be my 3rd year of doing it. I had to miss last year because I had just gotten a new job and didn't have the time to take off.

This is truly the event of the year for me. I don't do much racing at all other than maybe a few desert races here in Utah and a MX or 2 at my local track near my house. I had a buddy who started doing the Idaho City 100 about 5 years ago. He fell in love with the event and now he plans his entire year around it. In fact, he just ordered a new Gas Gas 200 last week specifically for this event. There are about 6 of us from here in Utah, and 2 guys from Colorado that are going. We should all be doing the Vet B class, Saturday only.

These trails are the best ever and the 2 years I have done it the conditions have been great (a little rain before and nice loamy, dust free trails most of the time on Saturday). However, it can be downright hot or snowing....just depends. It is probably about 80% pure singletrack with fireroad connectors.

We don't have any enduros here in Utah, but I really love the format. It is so much less stressful just lining up and then racing the clock. If you're familiar with the ISDE format then I won't bore you with all the details, but for me it was a completely new experiencing having to figure out check times and such.

If it is new to you, then I can tell you what works for me.

I can't wait!

Oh man.....just seeing the title "Idaho City 100" gets my heart pumping. I sent in my registration Friday and this will be my 3rd year of doing it. I had to miss last year because I had just gotten a new job and didn't have the time to take off.

This is truly the event of the year for me. I don't do much racing at all other than maybe a few desert races here in Utah and a MX or 2 at my local track near my house. I had a buddy who started doing the Idaho City 100 about 5 years ago. He fell in love with the event and now he plans his entire year around it. In fact, he just ordered a new Gas Gas 200 last week specifically for this event. There are about 6 of us from here in Utah, and 2 guys from Colorado that are going. We should all be doing the Vet B class, Saturday only.

These trails are the best ever and the 2 years I have done it the conditions have been great (a little rain before and nice loamy, dust free trails most of the time on Saturday). However, it can be downright hot or snowing....just depends. It is probably about 80% pure singletrack with fireroad connectors.

We don't have any enduros here in Utah, but I really love the format. It is so much less stressful just lining up and then racing the clock. If you're familiar with the ISDE format then I won't bore you with all the details, but for me it was a completely new experiencing having to figure out check times and such.

If it is new to you, then I can tell you what works for me.

I can't wait!

This is my first time. I would love to hear (read)your story. I am riding on saturday only in the Vet A class. Lay it on me.

I'm going this year also. I went last year and the LOI trail pace was really fast, I broke my front brake, and learned a lot about the format. Hopefully this year will go better for me. It is going to be on the other side of the highway from last year from what I hear and I've also heard 125 miles/day. Should be fun!!

It is probably about 80% pure singletrack with fireroad connectors.

Hmmmmm 80% you say :naughty:

Anyone got a link to these trail systems?

Hmmmmm 80% you say :naughty:

Anyone got a link to these trail systems?

your best bet is to hook up with a local. the whole state is riddled with sick singletrack. the forest service maps i have of idaho are actually pretty darned good, but they don't have difficulty ratings and the on-the-ground signing in some areas is not that great, so some navigation skills are required to do it on your own. unless you are very skilled rider it is possible to get in way over your head in some areas. last year's race course was mostly pretty mellow (imho, but i enjoy 5moh), but some idaho trails are unforgiving of mistakes.

You asked for it.....here you go:

Here are some random thoughts regarding the Idaho City 100 based on my past experience. Velosapiens write up is awesome and I used that to live through the event vicariously last year since I couldn’t attend.

As mentioned, the whole enduro format was completely new and different for me because we don’t have any here in Utah. Because it is ISDE format, the rules are also slightly different and no fancy timekeeping equipment is necessary. All you need is a watch and an odometer and you’ll be fine. You could even get away with just a watch.

The last time I rode it (2003) it was about 119 miles. About 70-80% of it is pure singletrack and the rest of the course is connected with fireroads.

You have to arrive with enough time Friday night to get signed in and have your bike inspected and impounded. This is usually a pretty long wait. When it is your turn, you wheel your bike up under an EZ-Up on a piece of carpet and they do a soundtest. It has to be 96db or lower. A new or recently repacked 2-stroke spark arrestor exhaust shouldn’t have a problem. My first year on my 300 EXC I passed with an 88db. The next year it barely squeaked by at 96db. I’ve got a new bike and exhaust this year so it shouldn’t be a problem. The four-strokers seem to have more problems passing unless it is a stock exhaust like a KTM or WR. They will also place a small dab of paint on your cylinder, exhaust and hubs I think. This is in the spirit of the real reliability ISDE where you can’t swap these parts out over the course of the event.

You then place your bike in inpound with hundreds of other bikes and can’t touch the bike until 10 minutes before your start time the next day.

The day of the event they will post the ride schedule. They will basically have an LOI, A, B, and C schedule posted. It will be something like this:

B Riders

Distance to Check 1 = 12 miles

Time allotted to Check 1 = 38 minutes

Cumulative distance to Check 2 = 20 miles

Time allotted to Check 1 = 29 minutes

Cumulative distance to Check 3 = 35 miles

Time allotted to Check 1 = 52 minutes

And so on (different for A riders, B riders, and C riders).

You will be assigned a start minute (.e.g 10:05 a.m.) and you then have to figure out your check times based on the schedule you are riding. So, in the example above if your start time was 10:05, you would have to add 38 minutes to that time to figure out what time you have to be to Check 1 and ride 12 miles. In this case it would mean that you have to be to Check 1 by 10:43. You would then have to be to Check 2 by 11:12 (and your cumulative mileage would be 20 miles). I think there are about 6 check points on the course.

I usually just take a piece of duct tape and write all of my check times and distances down on the tape with a Sharpie marker. I put one on my arm and another on my bike so I can look at it at a glance and know if I’m on pace (the redneck enduro computer). With your odometer and your watch you can check to make sure that you’re at least on pace to get to the check on time.

You will also receive a scorecard within a plastic liner. You want to just duct tape that to your front fender. When coming to a check point your arrival time will be written on your scorecard, and that will then be turned in at the end of the race to calculate your final score.

There are clocks posted in the staging/inpound area and at every checkpoint. They are all synchronized. It is best to synchronize your watch exactly with the clocks on Friday night.

10 minutes before your start time you’re allowed into the impound to retrieve your bike and do any tinkering on it that is necessary, but you can’t start your bike until the very second that your minute is up. You will leave in waves of 3 guys at a time, incremented by a minute.

In addition to the 5 or 6 checkpoints out on the course, while you are riding you will come upon different special tests. The location of the special tests are not known (although last year I seem to remember reading the grass track was right at the beginning of the course). You will be cruising through the woods and come upon a couple of guys sitting at a shade canopy. They’ll stop you, write your number down, and then give you a quick countdown of about 10 seconds. When they say go, you go like mad because this is where the real competition of the event exists. You have no idea how long or what the special test will consist of, but you just keep charging as hard as possible until you round a corner and all of a sudden you see a couple more guys sitting there. You don’t want to slow down…..they’ll just read your number when you exit the special test. I believe your score is the total number of seconds that it took you to complete the special test section. Your cumulative total of all your special tests is your final score (in addition to any minutes you burned at the checks) and this dictates whether you gold, silver, or bronze trophy. Obviously, the lower the number the better. Once through the special test you can relax again and just cruise at a good trail pace to make sure you make it to the next check on time.

One of the best and longest special tests is the grass track. Imagine a mile and a half long course layed out through somewhat virgin forest with ribbon tape forming lanes up and down through the trees with perfect black loamy dirt forming small berms in the corners and you have to rail them as fast as you can 

If you end up burning a check (showing up late), you can potentially hour out by having more than 60 minutes of cumulative burn time. It is important to note, that you cannot makeup time. In other words, if you’re 5 minutes late to a check, you cannot make that time up by arriving 5 minutes early to the next check. If you arrive 5 minutes late, then you need to add 5 minutes to all of the arrival times on your nicely prepared checkpoint duct tape sheet on your arm. You’ll have to do this on the fly, so obviously try not to burn any checks  I totally misunderstood this the last time I did it and informed my brother wrong. We were on different schedules and he ended up burning a check because he got caught in a big jam of riders on a switchback. He thought he could make up time so we went like mad to the next check and then went through it. This just messed him up even further. I felt bad because I was the one who told him he could do it that way and I was wrong. You just have to bump your schedule forward by 5 minutes.

When you arrive to a check you will hopefully be a few minutes early. If you are, just stop before rolling through the check. There are usually course workers there and you can get a drink, make a repair, or just try and relax. The clocks are posted at each check so just watch it and when your arrival minute clicks, roll your bike and have your scorecard marked. If you roll through the line at the check before your arrival minute, then you’ve just screwed yourself up.

There are 2 or 3 gas checks out on the course. In this case, if you arrive early…you need to park your bike, gas up, and then wait to roll through the check. Or, if you’re running late, then go through the check, get your scorecard marked, and then run back through the check and get your gas can.

You will need to be prepared to send a couple of gas cans out to the different gas checks. There is usually some old clapped out truck and trailer in the inpound area the morning of the race. It never ceases to amaze how me many gas cans you will see piled up on these trailers for the respective checks. Guys also duct tape sandwiches, Gatorade, air filters, and other sundry items to their gas cans in hopes of getting some nourishment out on the course. It’s quite the sight.

While out on the course, remember that you are racing the clock. Because of this, if you’ve got somebody coming up really hot on your tail, hold your line, and try and move over without killing your momentum and let them by.

If you finish the entire course, you will turn in your score card and if you are doing 2 days, you then have to inpound your bike. I believe you’re given a few minutes for any last minute maintenance (air pressure, air filters, etc.). For day 2, it is the same routine.

I’ve never done both days because 120 miles in one day is enough for this old man. I sure wish I could ride enough to be in shape for 2 days but that’s never going to happen.

I’m sure I’ve missed a few points that I wanted to communicate but hopefully you’ve gotten the basic idea of what to expect and what little things to have prepared for the event. You’re going to love it.

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