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Inch Pound Torque Wrench Question

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For those of you that have installed a Rekluse, the instructions for my 450 give torque readings in inch pounds. One of the specs says 96 inch pounds. That is the same as 8 foot pounds. I realize that most wrenches are most accurate when utilizing at least 20% of their rated capacity, but do you think using 8 foot pounds on a wrench designed for 5-250 ftlbs would be accurate enough? For the last bolts they specify 10 inch pounds, but go on to say that it represents a good crank with the included torx bit. If I need to buy a wrench that reads in inch pounds, I will, but I can't even find one that reads down to only 10 inch pounds. Any suggestions or advice would be really appreciated as I plan to put the Rekluse in this weekend.

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...but do you think using 8 foot pounds on a wrench designed for 5-250 ftlbs would be accurate enough?...

I personally would not use a 5-250 lb/ft torque wrench on something that requires 8 lb/ft of torque and would rather use my calibrated wrist + experience. Perhaps your local autoparts store has a loaner program where you can borrow a torque wrench with a range that's more appropriate for this application.

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Although I have a calibrated wrist, I bought a Sears craftsman inch/lbs wrench specifically for this bike. I kept reading about others breaking off bolts and didn't want to join them. There have been reports of invalid torque specs in the manual so experience is important too. If an 8mm bolt in past experience required 8ft/lbs don't believe that the ones on this bike require much more. Others have said that to keep things as light as possible, Honda has speced lighter grades of bolts. I don't know about that but in the past I've known Suzuki owners who allways complained about the quality of their hardware so I guess it's possible.

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You can get pretty close by hand.

98 in pounds is 98 pounds force directed one inch from the bolt being tightened. Or 8.17 pounds force 12 inches (one foot) from bolt being tightened, or 16.33 pounds force 6 inches away - all of these tighten the bolt to the same torque value.

Go to your bathroom scales and practice pushing down with thumb until you know the "feel" of what it take to get 16 pounds on the scale. And then apply this same force (effort) with thumb 6 inches out from the bolt.

Obviously leverage is a multiplier.......10 in-pounds is 10 pounds one inch away. Now apply a two foot wrench with the same 10 pounds force and the torque value skyrockets to 240 inch-pounds.

BlackBuzzard

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Although I have a calibrated wrist, I bought a Sears craftsman inch/lbs wrench specifically for this bike. I kept reading about others breaking off bolts and didn't want to join them.

Exactly, This is a performance machine with very light weight metals.

Buy a good )clicker type) in/lb wrench or sell the bike.

My 02 cents worth

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I'll get an inch pound wrench for the 96 inch pound bolts, but the only thing that I can find that would do the 10 inch pounds is a Craftsman screwdriver style. I already have a good clicker type wrench for the other stuff. I did find one mistake in the shop manual, it over specified what torque values should be on a bolt by 2lbs, and when I learned of that I pulled the bolts, and sure enough, they had strecthed somewhat and were replaced.

Hey Thumper 996, selling the bike isn't the only other option. Many of us that live in the great NW can actually afford to pay someone else to work on our stuff. I have a 360 Modena that I wouldn't dream of doing anything on. If someone isn't comfortable doing something, there is no lack of great techs that will do it for them.

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