Torque Wrench Questions

Looking at getting some torque wrenches for my bike (YZ250F) and my sons (KTM Pro Jr.)

After searching looks like I need a 3/8" or 1/4" at 40-200in/lbs or a 25-250 in/lb to cover the lower ranges (or something similar to that range) so I'm in the middle of the range when using it. On the KTM, I need to torque something at around 265 in/lbs (22 ft/lbs) which is out of range. What would be a good range for this for the second torque wrench.

I haven't done the valves yet, I do the basic maintenance with a 3/8" rachet socket wrench with adapters to fit my 1/4" sockets, 3 years and no problems yet. I also have various lengths 3/8" extenders I use.

1. Is it ok to use adapters when using the torque wrench? Or should I just get a 1/4" size and some new extenders?

2. I notice the handle length (short/long) may vary on these wrenches, what length in inches should I be looking at?

I was looking at the Stanley Protos and some from Sears for a start. :naughty: ThX!

I would not use an extentions. You will not get a accurate reading. The long the extention the more it will be off.

I've got a SnapOn myself, never given me any problems in 4 years. Lengths of the handles are determind by the range of the wrench.

If you do use an extension, there is a simple calculation you need to apply to 'correct' the readings:

M1 = M2 x L1 / L2, where

M1 is the torque setting of the wrench

M2 is the actual torque applied to the bolt/nut

L1 is the normal length of the wrench

L2 is the length of the wrench with extension

Remember the length is measured to the center/middle of the handle.

e.g. If you add a 5inch extension to a 12inch wrench and need a torque setting of 10Nm (M1=10*12/17). Set the wrench to 7Nm (M1=7.058).

On the otherhand, if the 'extenders' you are talking about do not extend the overall length of the wrench, the setting remains at 10Nm. Another tip that seems to be fairly accurate is that most wrenches are mostly accurate in the middle of their specified range.

Socket adapters won't affect the torque figures because the socket is still on the same center.

Socket adapters won't affect the torque figures because the socket is still on the same center.

This is true as long as there is no flex in the adapter.

Right now snap-on has their new digital torque wrenches on sale. I don't remember the exact cost but they weren't much more than their normal torque wrenches.

Socket adapters won't affect the torque figures because the socket is still on the same center.

Tubo is correct. Drive adapters don't change the readings. Adapters like a "crows foot" which alter the length of the wrench will.

Looking at getting some torque wrenches for my bike (YZ250F) and my sons (KTM Pro Jr.)

After searching looks like I need a 3/8" or 1/4" at 40-200in/lbs or a 25-250 in/lb to cover the lower ranges (or something similar to that range) so I'm in the middle of the range when using it. On the KTM, I need to torque something at around 265 in/lbs (22 ft/lbs) which is out of range. What would be a good range for this for the second torque wrench.

I haven't done the valves yet, I do the basic maintenance with a 3/8" rachet socket wrench with adapters to fit my 1/4" sockets, 3 years and no problems yet. I also have various lengths 3/8" extenders I use.

1. Is it ok to use adapters when using the torque wrench? Or should I just get a 1/4" size and some new extenders?

2. I notice the handle length (short/long) may vary on these wrenches, what length in inches should I be looking at?

I was looking at the Stanley Protos and some from Sears for a start. :naughty: ThX!

I have the following:

3/8" 25-250 inch lbs.

3/8" 10-75 foot lbs.

1/2" 20-150 foot lbs.

With the needed socket adapters, I have not needed anything else.

Don't worry about the handle length. That varies depending on the size of the torque wrench. A small inch-pound wrench will have a very short handle but a 1/2" wrench that goes up to 250 foot-pounds will have a real long handle.

Save yourself some money and just get the plain old fashioned beam type torque wrenches.

Get all three, 1/4", 3/8", & 1/2" drive so you'll be able to be in the middle of the range like others have said.

The "beauty" of the beam types is you calibrate them yourself by bending the beam when it's not lining up with the zero.

With clicker types (digital & micrometer) you "have" to send them out to be calibrated, and you can never be certain when they are off and there's special storage instructions and you're not supposed to use them as breaker bars.

I've used both types and have come to prefer the beam types for the reasons above.

Plenty accurate for what we're doing and maybe more accurate than the clickers depending on circumstances.

One down side to the beam types is they don't ratchet.

Obviously, opinions will vary on this & yeah, I'd like to have the clicker types if I could get them calibrated for free. If I worked in a shop I'd definitely have a set.

FWIW....

we have a few torque wrenches!! we got some where you turn it to set it and we have a snap on one thats digital and it vibrates when your too the torque limit you set it at!!

Save yourself some money and just get the plain old fashioned beam type torque wrenches.

Get all three, 1/4", 3/8", & 1/2" drive so you'll be able to be in the middle of the range like others have said.

The "beauty" of the beam types is you calibrate them yourself by bending the beam when it's not lining up with the zero.

With clicker types (digital & micrometer) you "have" to send them out to be calibrated, and you can never be certain when they are off and there's special storage instructions and you're not supposed to use them as breaker bars.

I've used both types and have come to prefer the beam types for the reasons above.

Plenty accurate for what we're doing and maybe more accurate than the clickers depending on circumstances.

One down side to the beam types is they don't ratchet.

Obviously, opinions will vary on this & yeah, I'd like to have the clicker types if I could get them calibrated for free. If I worked in a shop I'd definitely have a set.

FWIW....

I agree. Most good engine builders use click type torque wrenches to assemble their engines because they are much faster. When they need to check the calibration on their click type torque wrenches they torque a bolt then break out the trusty beam type to verify the torque is correct. In a home type setting where time is not a factor, I would always recommend beam type torque wrenches.

Thanks for all the tips and insights! :naughty:

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