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aluminum frame worth it?

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The dealer show is in Vegas in June, that is where Yamaha is supposedly going to announce their aluminum frame. But does anyone really want an aluminum frame? overly rigid, perimeter frames are not all that they are cracked up to be, in my opinion. i also think that the weight savings is not going to be that great. the 2-stroke shaved 5 pounds not only because of the frame, Yamaha also took weight off of the swingarm and changed some fasteners around. According to Dirt Rider, the Yamaha 250F has the best motor and suspension of all the 250 thumpers. So why does it need to change?

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The Yamaha design is old and thier needs to be a change by now. Also it feals top heavy even if its close in wieght to the others. Handling is better on the CRFs which is why they are changing the frame.

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Yamaha wouldn't screw up their already potent 250F w/ an aluminum frame. It will be just as good for the bike as it was for the 2-strokes. Once it gets the new ergnomics, though, the other OEMs better watch out cause that is the ONLY thing this bike lacks.

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I personally think yes. It will help get the weight down. Next it will it allow it to compete withe CRF in a marketing sense. People like the whiz bang factor although it may or maynot allow progress. Yamaha is in a sales slump compared to Honda and need a pick me up. If that means releasing an aluminum frame, so be it.

Erik

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Why ask about an unknown?

Man, wait until there are some ride reports before you start asking questions about the frame. If anyone knows about it, they are under a gag order from yamaha anyways.

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i believe the alumnium frame would definetely be worth it! The Yamaha four strokes need an update and that would be the best thing for them, they would keep and make that many new sales because of it :naughty:

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The Yamaha design is old and thier needs to be a change by now. Also it feals top heavy even if its close in wieght to the others. Handling is better on the CRFs which is why they are changing the frame.

exactly what i wanted to say

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but why are they going with a perimeter frame on the four stroke and not on the two stroke? i wish they would use the 2 stroke frame on the four stroke, that would be tight.

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The dealer show is in Vegas in June, that is where Yamaha is supposedly going to announce their aluminum frame. But does anyone really want an aluminum frame? overly rigid, perimeter frames are not all that they are cracked up to be, in my opinion. i also think that the weight savings is not going to be that great. the 2-stroke shaved 5 pounds not only because of the frame, Yamaha also took weight off of the swingarm and changed some fasteners around. According to Dirt Rider, the Yamaha 250F has the best motor and suspension of all the 250 thumpers. So why does it need to change?

Pretty much with you on this. I'd take the perimiter frame over the old backbone style, but no thanks on the rigidity that the aluminum frame will bring, not for me, especially not on the trails. I don't have a problem with the weight of my '05 after coming off a '01 WR426.

If I rode more track my outlook might be a bit differnet.

Dodger :naughty:

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The Honda CRF250 has less parts in their motor (SOHC vs DOHC) and an aluminum frame and it weighs a whopping 1/2 pound lighter than the YZF, so the only valid reason yamaha should go with an aluminum frame, or ANY new frame, is to lower the seat height and ground clearance (no need for 15"!)so it isnt as top heavy.

the 2005 WRs have a lower seat height and ground clearance than previous years and they are still several inches higher than the competition.

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The Honda CRF250 has less parts in their motor (SOHC vs DOHC) and an aluminum frame and it weighs a whopping 1/2 pound lighter than the YZF, so the only valid reason yamaha should go with an aluminum frame, or ANY new frame, is to lower the seat height and ground clearance (no need for 15"!)so it isnt as top heavy.

the 2005 WRs have a lower seat height and ground clearance than previous years and they are still several inches higher than the competition.

and to get the oil out of the frame and to lower the weight of the gas tank and to shave a few pounds and to update an aging bike that have consumers fleeing to the red side and .........

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it doesnt need to change, they just wanted to make it better. and you do notice the difference in weight.

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The Honda CRF250 has less parts in their motor (SOHC vs DOHC) and an aluminum frame and it weighs a whopping 1/2 pound lighter than the YZF, so the only valid reason yamaha should go with an aluminum frame, or ANY new frame, is to lower the seat height and ground clearance (no need for 15"!)so it isnt as top heavy.

the 2005 WRs have a lower seat height and ground clearance than previous years and they are still several inches higher than the competition.

Actually there are more parts in Honda's SOHC valve setup than the DOHC setup in the Yamis. Several inches is an exageration.

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the 2005 WRs have a lower seat height and ground clearance than previous years and they are still several inches higher than the competition.

Several inches higher? Not even close to being a fact.

I do agree that the bike needs to be freshened up a bit. One thing is that the alloy frames look very cool and cool looks sell a lot of bikes. The '05 Yamahas still look a lot like the '98 YZ 400F so they're getting REAL familiar looking, regardless of how well they work. With this being Y's 50th anniversary, they may go all out and bring some cool stuff. I hope they don't mess too much with how motor makes power cause it's just about right. If they can drop a few pounds, lower the cg a bit and put on the best suspension, it'll be right up there with the best. Oh yeah, keep that legendary blue reliability!

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I hate to say this but My CRF is the tallest bike I own. With my YZ450F being the shortest by an inch. I have actaully sat out there measuring trying to figure out why it is do tall, especially in the front. The lower triple clamp is 1.5 inches further from the center of the axle and the handlebar(same Henry bend) is 1" taller.

But it still looks better then the YZ. YZ needs aluminum.

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Am I the only one here thinking that there's a marketing angle here?

Could it be that the evolution of the steel frame thumpers ended, and yamaha thought "This is as good as it gets. If we want to sell new bikes next year, we have to do something completely new."

I'm an RND manager, so here's the basic rule:

When you're planning a roadmap for your current product, you also begin planning the next generation, to when you can't improve your current product any more.

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