Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Chain question XR250R

Recommended Posts

After riding (and falling) through some heavy mud, a couple miles later it was like my rear wheel was just locked up, checked the chain and it was as stiff as a dead snake. So, loosened the wheel, kicked it forward, freeplay was restored. Guys told me, "you've gotta warped chain, change it and the sprockets". So, gotta new chain, new sprockets and pulled off the rear tire and getting ready to go. But, being a noob, I'm curious the old chain seems ok. What does a "warped chain" look like? Is it obvious? What else should I do, since I've got this wheel off and ready to pull sprockets? :naughty:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never heard of a warped chain :naughty:

but if you want to see if its straight, lay it on its edge on a flat surface and see if there a belly like curve, if you have a good O ring chain alot of things usually happen long before the chain will be "warped".

I cannot possibly imagine the force required to warp a chain...especially when its installed on the bike

It almost sounds alot like when i was working in a oil refinery and we'de get newbies to get steam samples :naughty:

stu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

maybe the guys said the chain is kinked???

maybe u didnt adjust the freeplay b4 u ride???

:naughty:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What else should I do, since I've got this wheel off and ready to pull sprockets? :naughty:

Remove the old rear sprocket by loosening the nuts on the inside of the sprocket, don't try to loosen the allen head bolts, they are soft and will round.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I removed the sprocket by loosening the nuts back of the sprocket first, but

when it comes to re-tightening there's no room for a torque wrench or extension because of the spokes in the way. So I assume (?) you have to get an allen head socket and torque them from that side anyway. I haven't gotten the shop manual yet (on order). What are the torque values on 'em?

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I removed the sprocket by loosening the nuts back of the sprocket first, but

when it comes to re-tightening there's no room for a torque wrench or extension because of the spokes in the way. So I assume (?) you have to get an allen head socket and torque them from that side anyway. I haven't gotten the shop manual yet (on order). What are the torque values on 'em?

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

I've never torqued them. Just use a combination wrench to tighten the nuts evenly and hold the allen bolt with an allen wrench.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've never torqued them. Just use a combination wrench to tighten the nuts evenly and hold the allen bolt with an allen wrench.

Sounds good to me. Thanks, guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rear wheel locking up in heavy mud is a common problem when the chain is a little tight to begin with.

This happened to a friend this past weekend. Mud buildup on both sprockets as well as the chain will make it much tighter than usual.

I'm sure your old chain is fine. When you are going out on those wet days, loosen your chain off a little more than usual.

Al

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rear wheel locking up in heavy mud is a common problem when the chain is a little tight to begin with.

This happened to a friend this past weekend. Mud buildup on both sprockets as well as the chain will make it much tighter than usual.

I'm sure your old chain is fine. When you are going out on those wet days, loosen your chain off a little more than usual.

Al

Yes, when I got the rear wheel and chain off the front sprocket and engine case were packed tight with mud more than I've ever seen before. I think this was a major factor in the apparent "seizing" of the rear wheel. I laid the chain out and it appeared to be within normal limits. But the O rings did show some wear so I replaced sprockets and chain. I ran it pretty hard at Clear Creek previously so that and the previous miles justify it a much needed break with some replacement parts. :naughty:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, when I got the rear wheel and chain off the front sprocket and engine case were packed tight with mud more than I've ever seen before. I think this was a major factor in the apparent "seizing" of the rear wheel. I laid the chain out and it appeared to be within normal limits. But the O rings did show some wear so I replaced sprockets and chain. I ran it pretty hard at Clear Creek previously so that and the previous miles justify it a much needed break with some replacement parts. :naughty:
You can either remove your CS guard or modify it to look like this. It keeps the mud from building up.

Countershaft%20Guard.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×