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Check out this 34 HP 125 4-stroke from 1966!

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hondagp1.jpg

Specifications: 5 cylinder in line, 4 stroke, air-cooled, 124.4 cc (35.5 x 25.14 mm), :naughty:34 HP at 20,500 rpm, max revolutions 23,000 rpm, DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder, 5 carburretteurs, magnesium crankcase, electronical ignition, 9 gears, chain driven, drum brakes, tyres 18", mass 85 kg, max speed 210 km/h.

The Swiss racing motorcyclist on small motorcycles, Luigi Taveri, won the worldchampionship three times on the Honda 125 cc.

http://www.kunis.nl/bikesuk/index.html#Honda%20GP

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Hey! A German invented the motorcycle!! Killer site, OBB!! :naughty::naughty:

In fact it is coincidence that the first actual motor vehicle was one with two wheels. The German Gottlieb Daimler in 1885 built a one cylinder motorcycle with a mechanical exhaust valve and an automatic input valve. First he tried the machine in a boat and a carriage, and later he mounted it in a massive wooden chassis on two wheels. In that way Daimlers "Reitwagen mit Petroleum Motor" was born.

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Yeah...what do the Japs and Swiss know? :naughty::naughty:

Friggin killer, dude. That is amazing!! :D

Honda also made a 50cc road racing bike that had a top speed of over 110 MPH in 6th gear!

"The 50cc RC113 that won the 1963 Dutch TT made more than 10 horsepower at 19,000 rpm, arranging four valves atop a tiny, 33mm bore, scarcely larger than the diameter of a quarter."

I think I saw a picture of that 50cc motor's combustion chamber with a dime next to the intake valves. The dime was larger in size! Pic was in a magazine years ago. Can't find it on the net.

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Honda also made a 50cc road racing bike that had a top speed of over 110 MPH in 6th gear!

"The 50cc RC113 that won the 1963 Dutch TT made more than 10 horsepower at 19,000 rpm, arranging four valves atop a tiny, 33mm bore, scarcely larger than the diameter of a quarter."

I think I saw a picture of that 50cc motor's combustion chamber with a dime next to the intake valves. The dime was larger in size! Pic was in a magazine years ago. Can't find it on the net.

wow 19,000 RPM's. I bet that motor needed valve adjustments every mile LOL just kidding. I wonder sometimes, why can a street bike spin to 20,000 rpm and not need valve adjustments but a dirtbike that spins 13,500 rpm needs valve adjustments every 10 hours??? It just don't make sense!!

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wow 19,000 RPM's. I bet that motor needed valve adjustments every mile LOL just kidding. I wonder sometimes, why can a street bike spin to 20,000 rpm and not need valve adjustments but a dirtbike that spins 13,500 rpm needs valve adjustments every 10 hours??? It just don't make sense!!

Go check out the F-1 video!! a V-8 doing 19,000 rpms and glowing red!!!

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Stratospheric revs, insane, microscopic mechanicals... I just love that stuff.

I think Honda also had a six-cylinder 250 back then as well, but they couldn't get it to handle. I had also heard that Honda destroyed these bikes when their racing career was over! :naughty:

Dan.

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I've read where, on that 125/5cyl, they assembled the valve train with tweezers and magnifying glasses!!

Honda did also make a 250/350 6cyl. Here's Mike the Bike ( :naughty: )at teh IoM, on either an RC165 or 166 (notice the 3 megaphones):

67-Mike-250cc-IOM-big.jpg

These 250/350's only turned around 19,000rpm, though! Honda won like 18 world GP championships in the 60's among the various classes. THe Handling wasn't so much an issue with the 25/350 class bikes but with the 500cc class 4cyl bikes. MV won like 7-8 world 500 gp titles in a row back then.

A valve job after 10hrs?? These are world championship GP bikes. You'd better believe that those engines were completely torn down and inspected after each race weekend!

Can't sem to access them from work here, but I know there are sound files of some of these bikes online.

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I love these old bikes. They are truly the legacy, the saga, of any two-wheel enthusiast. Like CaptDan. said.. awesome.

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Here is an article about the 50cc RC110. The bike pictured is a reproduction. But the write up is about the original bike.

http://www.sportrider.com/bikes/2004/146_04_honda_dream/

Honda built some amazing machine in it's early days of racing. They came, kicked everyones butt and went home.

Can't imagine sitting on a bike turning 23000 RPM. I was told that the engine speed was close to the speed of sound! :naughty:

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those bikes were so sensitive to tuning that they would misfire when passing through shadows and shaded areas of the tracks due to the changes in air temp and density. They were amazing. They have had the 6 cyl bikes at the Vintage races at Daytona and at Steamboat before. I've heard one and it is unlike anything you've ever heard. Even an F1 doesn't sound close as they are turbo'd and 8 cyl's. That small 6 just screams.

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wasn't there someone who built some replica's of those multi-cylinder GP bikes just in the last few years? I think the used something like the 350/4 engine, but the 60's style framw/running gear/bodywork.

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The 125 required custom spark plugs. They were an 8mm thread and used the cylinder head as a ground electrode. In order to turn 22,500, it needed gasoline formulated to burn that fast. The fuel ended up with an octane number in the low 70's, and until they developed an advance curve for the electronic ignition. It would also go into a fit of detonation if the rider allowed the revs to drop below about 6000.

Suzuki had a 50cc three cylinder two stroke. One cylinder laid down, the other two standing up. Water cooled.

Oh, and Moto Guzzi had a 500cc DOHC V8. You can't imagine how beautiful it sounded.

In the mid/late 1960's, Mike Hailwood dominated the EuroGP 500cc scene on the 6 cylinder, 297cc Honda. It was their 250 originally, but was faster than anything in the 500 class. When the FIM wouldn't let them run up a class, they made it just a little too big to be in the 250.

At that time, FIM GP racing had claiming rules. Originally intended to keep the factories from spending huge amounts of money by raising the specter of someone buying one of their works bikes for next to nothing, these rules were almost forgotten until one day when someone decided to claim Mike Hailwood's ride. Everyone expected Honda to go nuts and lodge a protest, but after reviewing the rule book, they gathered up the bike, tired out from having just run away with yet another race, and in need of a fresh engine, and very politely presented it to the happy buyer for the $2500 (if I recall) claiming fee. Then, they asked him, "Where do you intend to get parts for it?" :naughty:

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At the track in Motegi, Japan, there is a Honda museum with almost every bike (and car) they've ever made. There is a station where you can put on headphones and listen to about 18 different engines being revved through the gears. Some of these things sound incredible and you can hear how each cylinder on some of them make their own unique sound. Like an internal combustion orchestra.

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