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Taco owners - oversize filter, no modification!

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Hey guys. I just did a oil change on my Taco with a oversize oil filter. No modification needed, just bolted right up. And what's even better, you can get it in any brand filter.

Just get a Jeep Liberty oil filter. I got a Mobil 1 and the Model is M1-209. The dimentions are the same, as are the threads, it is just 1.5" longer over stock. So now your oil lasts longer, filters better, and gets better oil flow.

It's for the 3.4L V6 engines. I'm not sure bout the trusty 4 bangers, but for the V6, the M1-209 will work. It doesn't hit anything and fits in there perfectly.

Fo the same price you can run a bigger filter and have a healthier engine. Just thought I'd share this with you guys.

Thanks to everyone at www.ttora.com for lettin me know bout this!

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This also leaves less oil in the pan at highway speeds and higher rpms. Which can be bad. On a standered 5 quart v-8 system at highway speeds. There is only one quart in the pan. No say your running high RPM's and are on a high angle with a filter that is double the size. There might not be enough oil to suficently feed the oil pump. Thus causeing major problems.

My point, your probably fine but just think of the repricutions one change has on everything else. Just not one thing in the whole system. :)

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The repurcussions of switching from an M1-102 to an M1-301 in my Tundra is I no longer have a half-quart of Mobil-1 left in the garage that I have to remember to grab for the next oil change.

The 4.7l Tundra uses 6.5 quarts, but with the M1-301, it takes an even 7 to bring it up on the dipstick.

Thus... the impact when in operation is no net change in pan oil level, and with system capacity increased by 1/2 quart, it provides for better cooling and more liquid area into which to disperse contaminantes so the oil remains cleaner longer.

It's all good.

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The repurcussions of switching from an M1-102 to an M1-301 in my Tundra is I no longer have a half-quart of Mobil-1 left in the garage that I have to remember to grab for the next oil change.

The 4.7l Tundra uses 6.5 quarts, but with the M1-301, it takes an even 7 to bring it up on the dipstick.

Thus... the impact when in operation is no net change in pan oil level, and with system capacity increased by 1/2 quart, it provides for better cooling and more liquid area into which to disperse contaminantes so the oil remains cleaner longer.

It's all good.

Or you could do that. I was to lazy to type out the adding the extra oil part. :):D

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The oil pressure light takes longer to go off once the truck is started with the larger filter. The Land Cruiser filters are bigger and fit too. I figure oil pressure light on longer is the motor running longer without adequate oil pressure. More wear.

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The oil pressure light takes longer to go off once the truck is started with the larger filter. The Land Cruiser filters are bigger and fit too. I figure oil pressure light on longer is the motor running longer without adequate oil pressure. More wear.

Why not just fill your filter with oil before you put it on? Or did toyota pull one of those boneheaded moves and put the filter on sideways or upside down like chrysler has done on a few vehicles? :)

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The filter is sliughtly upside down. But if you get a good filter that has a good drainback valve you should be fine. My oil light stays on the same duration.

There would be the same ammount of oil in the pan, since you have to add more oil to get to the full mark. It would be different if I put in the stock ammount, then it would be way underfilled, but if you fill it to the full mark there's nothin that can happen.

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The filter is sliughtly upside down. But if you get a good filter that has a good drainback valve you should be fine. My oil light stays on the same duration.

Strange, I've never seen a oil dummy light come on when doing a oil change if the filter was filled, must be a tacoma thing.

I wish engineers would get their head out of their butts and stop putting filters on sideways or upside down though, thats a serious pet peeve of mine :)

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Strange, I've never seen a oil dummy light come on when doing a oil change if the filter was filled, must be a tacoma thing.

I wish engineers would get their head out of their butts and stop putting filters on sideways or upside down though, thats a serious pet peeve of mine :)

Hell the only reason wew would fill the filters on diesels was to build oil pressure faster. On the smaller ones it's not nessicary.

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Hell the only reason wew would fill the filters on diesels was to build oil pressure faster. On the smaller ones it's not nessicary.

I fill the filter on everything (except those handlful of chrsylers where thefilters upsidedown lol)

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Strange, I've never seen a oil dummy light come on when doing a oil change if the filter was filled, must be a tacoma thing.

I wish engineers would get their head out of their butts and stop putting filters on sideways or upside down though, thats a serious pet peeve of mine :)

Pay attention. When you turn the key on without tuning the engine over, the oil light is on. Just like when your junk dies going down the road.

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Pay attention. When you turn the key on without tuning the engine over, the oil light is on. Just like when your junk dies going down the road.

well yeah... all the lights are on then, I meant after you start it. :)

You said you had to wait for oil pressure to build AFTER you started the motor, with my vehicles (with a prefilled oil filter) the oil psi jumps up immediately when you turn the key, never seen a vehicle that takes a few seconds to build pressure :)

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never seen a vehicle that takes a few seconds to build pressure :)

All of my Chevys and Fords did.

My Toyotas have gauges :)

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I'd avoid the larger cansiter types. I see many times the Fram PH8A for Ford V8's used all the time. Bad deal. Lots of capacity, but it will need to fill before one gets oil pressure, this can take some time and starve you engine pf needed oil pressure on each startup and the most important thing is Toyotas oil bypass isnt in the block like the early Fords were, its in the filter itself. So on a cold morning using the filer from a Ford, it can "pop" the filter open. They may be installing the bypas in all filters now, but havent in the past. If you want more filtering capacity for your 3.4 Toyota V6 Tacoma, just ask for a filter for the Toyota V8 found in the Tundra, Landcruiser or Sequoia. Its about 1" taller, not a lot of extra capacity, but extra filtering capacity. Not that I know anything about Toyotas or anything :):)

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Pay attention. When you turn the key on without tuning the engine over, the oil light is on. Just like when your junk dies going down the road.

Really. Let me give you a cookie for that. Of course there is no oil pressure when the engine is not turning over. DIRP!

When I start the engine, the light stays on for a split second then shuts off. Just like the stock filter. It added more capacity, but not too much.

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Most all the lights come on when you start the vehicle. Thats the system running a test of all the sensers and components. To make sure they are functinoning properly.

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