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Crankcase-frame pipe

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Have a problem with my bike suddenly stalling etc. The crankcase-frame pipe is getting old, cracked, bent and flat in the middle. Could this be the cause?

Chris

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Its a 1.5" diameter pipe from the crankcase that goes into the frame. I can take a picture of it later today.

Chris

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1.5"?? Are you on the wrong page? I think your looking for RMT (riding mower talk). 🙂

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Are we talking about the crancase vent hose that goes to the airbox (at least on the 05 models it does), Maybe we have a metric to inches conversion error? 1.5" is what, about 37.5mm

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On the TE610E there is a crankcase breather hose that comes from top rear of bottom end and makes a right angle to main frame tube just above the swingarm pivot. It's .5"d x 3"l (approx). I doubt this being in bad condition is the cause of the stalling, but maybe a hint of the general condition of the rubber parts of the engine and fuel system. You need to go through the whole fuel system, Dellorto carbs don't like being dirty. I'd clean the carb, replace all the fuel and vent lines(gas cap included) and pull the petcocks and clean them, while they are out flush the tank. Replace the breather hose thats cracked and clean your air filter.

Norman

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I definately got my inches wrong in my original post. I forgot to divide...DOH.

The guy I bought the bike from was good at doing all the basic stuff and had all the plastic in great shape etc but he obviously hasn't changed anything but the cosmetics on the bike apart from oil/filter which I've checked. Most of the rubber etc is cracked/old so I'm gonna replace all that but nothing is that bad that it should cause the bike to stop when warm. Some people I've talked to think the problem is the coil so I'm gonna try replacing it before I put it into the shop. Shouldn't be a hard task for a newbie like me? Its on the other end of the lead to the plug, right? I replaced the plug last week cause the rubber around it had cracked just above the entrance to the cylinder. Half the plug was rusted. Maybe I got the same problem going on around the coil too...

It can't be that bad a problem whatever is causing the "stall when warm" prob since the bike runs great otherwise?

Chris

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1. check to see that your gas tank & carb are venting properly

2. Ignition/flywheel This is the only real common problem with the 610/570

as stated in several other posts on here. The epoxy that holds the magnets on breaks loose. The best and most accurate cure is a new flywheel. The reason this happens is moisture stuck in the ignition cover expanding when the motor is hot. Remove the cover and look for the ever popular "magnesium oxidation". After washing or wet riding it's best to remove the cover and blow it out and let it air dry.

3. the coil might be the last place to look. It either works or not.

I would look at the venting issue first 🙂 ,as the ignition problem causes the timing to be off first with back firing and sputtering and then not run at all. 🙂

good luck!

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OK, lets ignore that tube for a bit and go back to the problem. Fuel tank vents cause all kinds of problems and the aftermarket keeps trying to sell us check valves that allow air in but not out;

1: For fuel to run down into the carb air must be able to vent in to the tank to displace the fuel. If air can not flow in the bike will run OK (or a bit lean) for a while, then the engine will die, quick test here, best if its quite, remove your helmet so you can hear, then remove the gas cap, if it goes "woosh" you have found your problem.

2: Air also needs to flow out, What commonly happens is you start out with a tank full of cold gas, the engine heat expands the gas faster than the engine is consuming it so the tank developes presure. That pressure overpowers the float/needle valve, overfills the float bowl and floods the engine.. If you remove the gas cap when this is going on it can boil over onto the exhaust pipe.

Best thing is have nothing in the vent restricting it, and make certain your vent hose can not vent onto the exhaust!

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Have tried with the cap off and without a hose etc but doesn't make any difference. I don't get the whoosh sound either. Don't think anything on the bike is very "aftermarket". Generally pretty original.

Another problem I'm having is that the starter sometimes clicks but doesn't turn. Me and a friend with a sm610s tried switching a couple of things today - 1 at a time. First the coil (mine was severly oxidized but we got that cleaned up) and lead to the plug, and then the battery, none of which made any difference on either the stalling or clicking. We finally removed quite a bit of oxidation off the "remote switch" which is what the husqvarna manual I got on husqvarnausa.com called it (anyone have a better name for it? 6 leads in via a "sugarcube" and 2 quite thick wires, 1 from the positive on the battery. Its right next to the battery). This didn't help either.

The funny thing is that sometimes when I tap the start motor with a screwdriver, the starter motor works 99/100. Sometimes the start-relay doesn't even click but tapping the "remote switch" or start motor will cure it. At one point it seemed like there was a link between the starting and stalling issues since the stalling is very sudden and its obvious the plug isn't firing at all - indicating something electrical. But the screwdriver tapping doesn't always help on the stopping problem.

I may have noticed another symptom today too: the battery power depletes quite quickly after only a few starts even though we have the bike running or a ride for a while (sometimes you can ride 5 mins without the stalling, though its generally gotten worse since first problems). Can there be a common link to all these probs?

I would check out the carb but that seems complex for a newbie like me. I'm only just getting to grips with some of the electrics 🙂 Is this as hard a job as it seems?

Chris

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You seam to have a lot of corosion? So that makes me thing you need to focus on electrical conenctions and componants.

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