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Mobil 1 Oils Analysis in!

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Gents,

The oil analysis results comparing the old Mobil 1 15w-50 synthetic (red cap) and the new Mobil 1 15w-50 Extended Performance (gold cap) show the oils to be nearly identical.

The amounts of Molybdenum in both oils are the same (82ppm) so there will be no clutch problems with the new oil. The amount of anti-wear additives (zinc and phosphorous) are virtually the same. The amount of zinc in the new oil is down a few ppm's but the phosphorus is up a few ppms.

For those of us that fell in love with the old red cap fear not, the new gold cap EP 15w-50 is the same oil.

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My source is the lab that does our oil analysis. The actual OA lab results will be posted on the YZ400/426/450F forum tomorrow.

I purchased 2 sample kits ($30) and sent in a sample of each. Mobil wouldn't give me their "Secret Formula" so I got my own.

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They were both new samples, I'm not going to pay $15 for an oil sample when I can change the oil for half the price. I used the red cap in all my bikes (as did many) with excellent results and was bummed when the discontinued that oil, or so they said.

I wanted to find out if the "new" gold cap had an adequate additive package for my bikes and a high amount of moly that could cause clutch problems. If you used the red cap and liked it, fear not, the gold cap is the same oil.

Marketing 101, change the package, mark it up and folks will buy it. Honestly I'm glad it is the same oil, I wasn't looking forward to chasing down a new oil.

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This is great news. I'm having trouble finding Rotella T synthetic here locally and I've sworn to never pay $9/qt for Yamalube 4R again.

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Thanks Brother, I could have saved $40 had I known this was done before....

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So Is this one of the better oil's to run in the 250F? I'm running Yamalube right now just because I have not had time to find another oil.

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I have had excellent service from Mobil 1 red cap 15w-50 in my YZ426 and WR250, that is why I took the time and effort to find out if the new "gold cap" was the same or similar. Turns out it is basically the same oil as the old red cap.

It's proven to be a good oil and readily available.

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Hey, another good Mobil synthetic oil for your motorcycles is Delvac 1 5W-40 heavy duty fleet diesel oil or its twin intended for regular consumers, Mobil 1 Truck and SUV 5W-40. Both of these oils have virtually no Moly (samples show anywhere from 0 to 3 ppm) and higher amounts of extreme pressure (EP) / anti-wear (AW) additives zinc and phosphorus than most auto oils (~30% higher) and comparable to the levels in Mobil 1 15W-50.

Here is a link to many virgin oil analysis results: http://theoildrop.server101.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=11;t=000310#000023

And another thing is that the 5W-40 costs less, at least here, than the new gold cap 15W-50. A 5 qt jug of 5W-40 runs ~$20 at Wal-Mart, while the same size 15W-50 runs ~$23.

I'm running this oil in my DRZ400 as well as my Yamaha FZ1 and my BMW M3.

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Hey, another good Mobil synthetic oil for your motorcycles is Delvac 1 5W-40 heavy duty fleet diesel oil or its twin intended for regular consumers, Mobil 1 Truck and SUV 5W-40.
I use T&SUV in my Chevy truck and my pathfinder, and I like it, but what concerns me about using it in the bike is whether it has adequate shear resistance and ability to retain its viscosity. The 8:1 hot/cold viscosity spread makes it suspect, but only a used sample will tell. Not all multigrades are subject to serious viscosity degradation in motorcycle transmissions, but a lot are, as are most non-synthetics and synthetics with greater than a 4:1 viscosity ratio.

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Multi grades are usually better for sheer stabilty, they contain no heat activatedpolymers to break down. A straight grade oil is great depending on engine design and climate. Any well know synthetic is usually pretty shear stable. Change oil according to climate. The oils with a wide viscosity range is what you want to stay away from. They have many polymers that create the wide range. Once the oil is broke down it will towards the lower viscosity.As far as I know mobil 1 has some of the best oils out there. Just buy car oil and be done with it.

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Thanks Brother, I could have saved $40 had I known this was done before....

I seem to recall posting the scan of an EP VOA from Wrooster's site back when you originally announced your intention?

Funny... I can't find the thread now.

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Multi grades are usually better for sheer stabilty, they contain no heat activatedpolymers to break down. A straight grade oil is great depending on engine design and climate. Any well know synthetic is usually pretty shear stable. Change oil according to climate. The oils with a wide viscosity range is what you want to stay away from. They have many polymers that create the wide range. Once the oil is broke down it will towards the lower viscosity.As far as I know mobil 1 has some of the best oils out there. Just buy car oil and be done with it.
Multigrade oils are generally manufactured by starting with a light base oil, 10 weight in the case of a 10w-40, and adding Viscosity Index Improvers, which are synthesized oil molecules as much as 1000 times the length of oil molecules. When cold, these curl up in tight spirals and/or balls, and don't have much affect on the fluid properties of the oil. When heated, however, they begin to uncurl, and have the effect of thickening the oil. When enough are added, our 10 weight base oil will be as thick as a straight grade 40 is at 212 degrees F, which is what 10w-40 means. The trouble is that these long chain molecules are comparatively fragile, and can be rather easily shredded by even a small transmission. The longer, and therefore more effective they are, the more easily they are destroyed, and you will find yourself with a sump full of 8w-17 where your 10w-40 used to be if you aren't careful.

By their nature, synthetic base stocks have a higher viscosity index than natural petroleum already, which is to say that they thin out less with exposure to heat, and do not need as many VII's to behave as a multigrade. A high quality PAO base is often capable of behaving as a 15w-40 or a 20w-50 with no VII's at all, so they are usually less subject to this kind of thing. They can also use a smaller quantity of less fragile VII's to achieve a relatively impressive result, and can be very stable if formulated properly.

So, Younger, you actually have it backwards. Viscosity Index Improvers, or "heat activated polymers" in marketing parlance, are an element of multigrades, not of straight weight oils. You are correct that oils with greater than a 4:1 ratio of their high and low viscosities should be approached cautiously, but that is because of the lighter bases used, and the likelihood of a greater content of the fragile VII's. Shell Oil directly advised a TT member against using Rotella Syn 0w-40 in a 250F for that reason.

Shear resistance plays no part in that question directly, and the ability to retain viscosity is not a measure of shear resistance, although it is often called Shear Stability. MG oils with good shear resistance hold their viscosity better because they resist the complete crushing out of the oil film from between two parts under pressure, which in turn can protect VII's from damage. A great example of how shear resistance is unrelated to viscosity is Dexron ATF. Dexron II & III (7 weight) have shear resistance equal to GL-4 (75 and 80 weight) gear oils.

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I was actually thinking about single grade oils. Sorry. Single grade is more sheer stable and weather permitting,great in a motorcycle. I mixed multi and single grade up.

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