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Dwight_Rudder Broken bones and off road racing

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Dwight

I'm 14 years old and recovering from 2 broken wrists and a collar bone. I will start therapy next week but have been doing my own therapy at home for the last week or so. I can't wait to get back on the bike.

My question is this. Is there anything you would suggest for training after I get back in the saddle? I will be riding/racing with the CTI wrist braces from this point forward. I was going to start small with my pit bike until I feel that my wrists are strong enough for my 250 Gas Gas which I will race in the open A class for the remainder of the season. I started in B but since my season is shot I'll move myself up since I was getting enough "push" from the other riders. I don't want to come off as being cocky but I would start 2 min. after the A class and finish with the A class riders.

I want to go pro. I know it's going to take time and dedication which I have both of. Is there anything special that I should be doing to prepare myself for the hard road ahead?

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Dwight

I'm 14 years old and recovering from 2 broken wrists and a collar bone. I will start therapy next week but have been doing my own therapy at home for the last week or so. I can't wait to get back on the bike.

My question is this. Is there anything you would suggest for training after I get back in the saddle? I will be riding/racing with the CTI wrist braces from this point forward. I was going to start small with my pit bike until I feel that my wrists are strong enough for my 250 Gas Gas which I will race in the open A class for the remainder of the season. I started in B but since my season is shot I'll move myself up since I was getting enough "push" from the other riders. I don't want to come off as being cocky but I would start 2 min. after the A class and finish with the A class riders.

I want to go pro. I know it's going to take time and dedication which I have both of. Is there anything special that I should be doing to prepare myself for the hard road ahead?

Do you want to go pro localy or national? Either one, you are right, it will take lots and lots of time and dedication (and money). With your wrists, start getting them stronger and ready for racing, but not to early.

Moving up to the A class since you missed most the season isnt what i would do, i would stay in B so your not pushed and ride over your head and do this again.

Good luck on your recovery and your racing,

S&F.

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I agree with " Small and Fast " , If you move up to "A" you can never go back . Stay where you are. Also , why are you riding such a large machine ? A 250 is big. Unless you are 5'10" or more I would stay on smaller bikes 100cc to 200cc bikes. You learn a lot more on small bikes. You learn to maintain your momentum more. You can throw a small bike around easier. You are young and can move up to 250cc bikes when you turn 20 or so. Stick with small bikes as long as you can. I still love small bikes I rode 100cc to 175cc bikes untill I was 27 years old and then moved to 250cc bikes. Later I moved to big bored XR250s. LOTS OF FUN .

Watch riding Pit Bikes as they tend to hurt a lot of people due to their small size and small wheels. They are too small. Get a Yamaha TTR125LE to practice on as a pit bike. They are a hoot and can be raced in cross country events with a few mods.

Go slow in moving up. Believe me , The AMA will move you up when you start doing good. Take plenty of vitamins and calcium to help with the healing process.

Cher'o,

Dwight

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Thanks for the guidance. As far as the size of the machine I love the power and have had smaller bikes and didn't feel comfortable on them. I was on a 200 Gas Gas for half a season but that still didn't feel right. The 250 has all the power I need plus some.

As far as the accident I was test riding a new track that we own before the public got on it (we own 400 acres of woods in IL. that is open to the public so I practice 2-3 days a week) so there wasn't really anyone pushing me. I was a gear too high, over jumped it and got my hands between the hand savers and bars which snapped both wrists. 🙂

I want to go pro on the national level and have gotten a chance to ride with Jeff Fredette and some other great riders. I was supposed to train with Jimmy Jerrett this summer but that didn't happen. I usually race the OMA series and local events including the Moose run and the 100 miler. I wrench on my own bike and can do a complete rebuild myself. Bikes are great and my family is backing me all the way.

Do you have any advise on how to go pro and maybe what I can look forward to? :D

I know I still need to learn alot but I am willing to learn. 🙂

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I was a gear too high, over jumped it and got my hands between the hand savers and bars which snapped both wrists. :eek:

Do you have any advise on how to go pro and maybe what I can look forward to? 🙂

I know I still need to learn alot but I am willing to learn. :applause:

I still think you are riding way too big a bike for a 14year old. Learn to ride with speed with less power. Sounds like you are depending on Horsepower too much. Learn to carry your speed with a smaller bore bike.

You have to get out there and show the sponsors what you can do. Start winning and sending out resume' . Ride with Jeff Fredette some more. He is a friend of mine and could teach you a lot.

HOW IN THE HELL DID YOU GET YOUR HANDS INTO THE BARK BUSTERS ?

Break your thumbs ? Keep your thumbs around the bars and not on same side as your fingers. OR did you endo and hang on the bars till your wrists hit the bark busters as you went over ?

Learn when to push off.

Cher'o,

Dwight

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Sorry about your injury. My brother is expert(now senior)enduro class rider who just went to intermediate class motocross then had a nasty crash-level 4ac separation. One thing he always did was pull his bark busters off for this very reason. I would also pull your kickstand off if you don't already for the track. Good luck with your recovery.

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On a side note to dwight. I did my first harescramble this weekend on my XR250 in 250C. Before I got into the race I expected to be at a major disatvantage going up against 250Fs and 250 smokers. It was a really muddy race and I couldn't have been more wrong. I think I actually had an advantage with the smooth tractor like power. I'm glad I decided to stay with the XR and not get a 125.

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Thanks for the guidance. As far as the size of the machine I love the power and have had smaller bikes and didn't feel comfortable on them. I was on a 200 Gas Gas for half a season but that still didn't feel right. The 250 has all the power I need plus some.

As far as the accident I was test riding a new track that we own before the public got on it (we own 400 acres of woods in IL. that is open to the public so I practice 2-3 days a week) so there wasn't really anyone pushing me. I was a gear too high, over jumped it and got my hands between the hand savers and bars which snapped both wrists. :eek:

I want to go pro on the national level and have gotten a chance to ride with Jeff Fredette and some other great riders. I was supposed to train with Jimmy Jerrett this summer but that didn't happen. I usually race the OMA series and local events including the Moose run and the 100 miler. I wrench on my own bike and can do a complete rebuild myself. Bikes are great and my family is backing me all the way.

Do you have any advise on how to go pro and maybe what I can look forward to? 🙂

I know I still need to learn alot but I am willing to learn. :applause:

Hey man, I might see you there. IMO the main thing that is going to hold me back is money.

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My injury occurred because I hit a jump one gear too high, the front end was up so I clicked the brakes to bring it down and it didn't bring it down enough. I clicked the brakes again and it brought down the front end too much. When I was in an endo position I looked back and saw the landing 20 foot behind me. I knew it was going to hurt. When I landed on the front tire my hands slipped between the bars and the hand savers. When the bike went one way my wrists snapped. If I would have pushed off from that height I would have broken my ankles instead. This way I let the bike take most of the abuse and suck up the impact.

I've been riding since I was 4 so I've been on small bikes. I don't really use the power unless I have to. In the conditions I ride and race in it's nice to have that extra power when it's needed. I have always used the power band as it was needed. It may sound strange but I can not only hear what the machine is doing I can also feel it. I can feel when the piston is just starting to lose comprestion or if something just isn't right. It's hard to explain.

I do know what you mean about the sponsors. I have to start racing some more AMA events to get noticed. They just don't seem to challange me as much. At least the Dist. 17 races, which are all at least quad wide with very little tech. sections. I like tight woods that hold a challange. I'm not in it for the race, I'm in it for the ride. I could care a less about trophies and such. I donate them to schools so they can change out the guy for basketball or whatever.

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You've got plenty of time, kid. Don't try to push too hard too soon. There's not much more fun than a good 125 on a tight course. You'd do well to stay there a while. There are kids older than you on 85's at Loretta Lynn's, doing National Hare n Hounds, and Enduros. They are the future pros precisely because they stuck with the small bores and learned the most difficult skills of the sport really well.

There are some wicked fast pros on 125's now. That would get my vote.

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I understand what you are saying about the small bikes. What do you guys think are some of the more difficult skills? Corners, log sections, tight woods etc?

I've raced in about 6 states and found that the courses are becoming more wide open. Is this what you guys think too?

When I wasn't injured I practiced tight woods, sand, whoops, creeks, big (the size of 55 gallon drums and bigger) and small log sections, vertical drop offs, off cambers, clay and rock conditions, grass tracks, 1+ story up hills and wide open sections. Is there anything you would recommend practicing after I get back on the machine?

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I understand what you are saying about the small bikes. What do you guys think are some of the more difficult skills? Corners, log sections, tight woods etc?

I've raced in about 6 states and found that the courses are becoming more wide open. Is this what you guys think too?

When I wasn't injured I practiced tight woods, sand, whoops, creeks, big (the size of 55 gallon drums and bigger) and small log sections, vertical drop offs, off cambers, clay and rock conditions, grass tracks, 1+ story up hills and wide open sections. Is there anything you would recommend practicing after I get back on the machine?

For my money, the most important skills are learning to deal with your controls in any situation, automatically and expertly. In other words, fine motor skills using brakes, throttle, balance and body position, clutch modulation, etc without having to think about any of it. This way, your full focus is on the course and its upcoming changes in terrain, and your decisions are consistently right. Your reactions are instantaneous and seamlessly smooth. You are intimately familiar with how your input changes the way the bike performs in varying conditions.

The best way to get this really down is to experiment with slight changes in bike setup and to ride hard in really technical terrain that requires frequent use of controls and varied use of technique. Your bike setup has to fit your preference, and it has to be consistent. You have to conform the adjustments to fit your style, then lock it all down so it's no longer a variable you have to deal with. Write it all down if you have to. Otherwise you have to start thinking about it again. Also, forcing yourself to develop habitual reactions to familiar situations will make that part so that you automatically know exactly what to do, instantaneously.

This will contribute to your relative safety and your speed more than anything else you can do with your practice time.

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Speaking of smaller bikes, at the last race, some guy came up to me and asked if I was the guy on the DRZ. I said yes. He said I "absolutly rip and he's never seen someone go so fast on such a big bike". We had a little convosation and he said "I'd hate to see you get on a 250 2 stroke, you'd be unstopable". I dont care who you are, someone saying you could be onstopable just makes you feel good.

I did ride a KTM300. In about 5 seconds of riding... I was the same speed I am on my DRZ. Im a very versitile rider and usually come close to my DRZ speed when I ride other bikes, but this bike, I was there instantly:thumbsup:

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