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Correct technique for overgrip

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Hi guys

Can anyone explain the correct technique for "overgripping" and what the real benefits of it are? i tried what i thought was correct my last outing at the track two days ago, basically took hold about a quarter turn forward on the throttle, problem is i overjumped a 15-20ft table that went straight into a big berm and when i landed because of my grip being in the "on" position already i grabbed a handful of throttle when i should have been braking desperately and went straight over the berm and down a vert drop on the otherside. Right now im writing this with a broken hand and two cracked ribs, its taking AGES :applause: dont laugh, i cant laugh with you right now, its too damn sore :eek: any ideas on why this overgrip is actually a good idea?

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Overgripping works to cut down on fatigue for me but I have learned to release the grip when I am going into a corner. On the two strokes I chop the throttle comming into the corners. On the four strokes I try not to overgrip so much because It seems that i don't need to twist the throttle as far as the two strokes. I find myself rolling the throttle on to get going or do obsticles and rolling the throttle off going into the turn, I try not to chop the throttle. On a bike 450 I do not over grip on my Husky 125 I do overgrip and release for the landings and corners. On a YZ250F I try to grip some where in between. This may take some time. I am sorry to hear about you getting hurt. I hope this helps. Thanks Mark

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thanks a lot, good advice, im still riding my trusty cr250 smoker and ur dead right, u definitely hav to twist a lot more, and more suddenly than the "rolling" i can use on my friends 450. i read that the overgrip makes the throttle response smoother and that was why i was keen on it, guess i need to practice it a bit more tho! :applause: fortunately the doc rekons i'll be ok in 2 weeks so i can get back and try perfect it. thanks for the advice!

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Yeh i over grip my 450f way less than my previous 250f, as an accidental open of my 450 means i am going bush fast.

Most stand in the central position, grabbing the bars with wrist angle 180 degree. I find this excessive on a 450 but it was fine on my 250f as it was ridden with much more throttle all the time.

Ive never heard it staed or read it anywhere but i definitely think over grip is both a bike and rider specific technique. Its also a technique that is likely to cause injury for beginners and on high powered bikes.

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its bets to practice the overgrip in a open area and get used to getting off the throttle. Mainly because of what happened to you. If your arms and elbows are in the correct position then overgripping should become natural. When your chin is up and over the bars and your elbows are out and up it will help put your hands in the correct position.

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Hi guys

Can anyone explain the correct technique for "overgripping" and what the real benefits of it are? i tried what i thought was correct my last outing at the track two days ago, basically took hold about a quarter turn forward on the throttle, problem is i overjumped a 15-20ft table that went straight into a big berm and when i landed because of my grip being in the "on" position already i grabbed a handful of throttle when i should have been braking desperately and went straight over the berm and down a vert drop on the otherside. Right now im writing this with a broken hand and two cracked ribs, its taking AGES :applause: dont laugh, i cant laugh with you right now, its too damn sore :eek: any ideas on why this overgrip is actually a good idea?

Welcome to TT, newbie. You'll really like it here -- lots of good info. I did a quick TT search here in the MX forum on the keyword "doorknob", and got a number of hits. Opening the throttle like you twist a doorknob is one of the tricks that gets talked about here. Check out this thread, including advice from Gary Semics, and see if it helps.

https://thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=183434

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thanks a mil guys, berkeman ur so right, this site is the bomb! i been reading so much from here and im glad i got involved, i think its great that you guys all share so much info! crodeo, i think im gonna take ur advice on the open area, my biggest problem is not balancing properly against the momentum of the bike so when the throttle comes open the increased speed of the bike is pushing me back on the seat and is pulling the throttle open even more, its a vicious circle that ends up with me on my ass like i did saturday! being in south africa i dont have access to any schools but theres a guy i met who rides pro here, who is gonna start taking me for lessons at the track to correct my problem areas, just as soon as im healed. hes damn good, actually riding the south african grand prix against all the big boys this weekend, Everts, Rattray etc... :applause::eek:🙂

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The primary reason for over gripping is to eliminate a severly bent wrist when riding. If you grip in a natural position, your elbow will drop down far, and your wrist will be bent at almost a 45 degree angle. It is completely un-natural, and can cause severe problems when hitting jumps, chops, or railing corners.

I got in the habit years ago on a 2smoke, and had a hard time getting rid of it with my 450. The main thing is to keep your hand moving on the throttle. If you grip, and go, you will find yourself in siuations such as where you are now (hope everything heals fast and proper by the way). It took me wahile to get used to to it, but once it is figured out, it really is a easier, safer way to ride. Just remember to try and keep your wrist and arm in a slightly neutral spot through all areas of the track.

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Overgrip is something ive taught myself over the last few years, but now im on my way back to half way between overgrip and normal grip. I studied sports physiology and biomechanics at uni for four years and there is no biomechanical or physiological research published as to the benefits of overgrip for improved leverage, reduced fatigue or stability and bike control that i am aware of.

It is based on a theory that by having high elbows the shoulders will remain more square to the handlebars and thus improve the lever angles to sustain bike control with less effort from the biceps, triceps and forarm muscles. That part is most likely correct. However it does require more effort from the deltoids, latisimus dorsi and pecterol muscles. These muscles are larger and yes more likely to handle the workload at a lower % of max force, thus hopefully fatigueing slower.

However some physiologists would argue that those muscles are more likely to be a higher % fast twitch fibres and hence not only fatigue quicker and be less suited to the job, but fatigue quicker and produce higher lactic acid quantities resulting in more general fatigue for the rest of the body.

So while not saying overgrip is a bad thing I think its more of a marketing tool that trainers use to value add to amutuers, as no untrained amutuer walks in to a training school with high elbows and overgrip. So they immediately feel they have been value added by doing so.

All the suggested benefits of overgrip are potentially true with the exception of safety. In no way shape or form is overgrip safer than normal grip.

Put overgrip versus normal grip on any safety matrix and not only is overgrip more likely to cause an injury, but it is likely to cause severe injury, where as normal grip is likely to cause minor limb injury to the right wrist. Granted undergrip is dangerous and likely to cause a wrist injury, but again the severity of the injury will still be far less life threatening then one caused by overgrip.

By far nrmal grip is the safest - based on an assumption that throttle and brake control are significant causes of accident. Not many would argue with this.

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my biggest problem is not balancing properly against the momentum of the bike so when the throttle comes open the increased speed of the bike is pushing me back on the seat and is pulling the throttle open even more, its a vicious circle that ends up with me on my ass like i did saturday!

Here's a thread that might help your balance work. Check out the 2nd post in the thread for some good drills and things to practice.

https://thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=258122

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I've been trying to make overgrip a natural habit too. Videos of me show that my elbows are too low, and i'm too far back (though I feel way forward).

It's good to hear that I'm not the only one finding this leads to difficult throttle control on a 450f. I guess that, ideally, if your balance is properly anticipating the forces on the bike, you won't be hanging on so tight with your hands and experience the fear of "can't shut off". Does this seem right?

This leads to a question though: why do the fastest pros (esp. Bubba, Reed) run their levers so high up? Look at any photos. If you overgrip, wouldn't you want the levers down to be in a natural reach position and keep your grip over?

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This leads to a question though: why do the fastest pros (esp. Bubba, Reed) run their levers so high up? Look at any photos. If you overgrip, wouldn't you want the levers down to be in a natural reach position and keep your grip over?

Here's a recent thread where we talked about the tradeoffs of different lever positions:

https://thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=254368

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Bubba could put his levers straight up in the air because he never uses the clutch.

Ricky sits down alot when he rides so his position isn't affected to much by where the levers are

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They have high levers cause its believed that higher levers reduces arm pump. I didnt believe it and I tried it. It is better. They are not level they are about 1.5 - 2cm from level to the top of the lever.

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saddlebackagain i noticed the xeact same thing with the levers and ran mine like that this weekend. i figure if imovergripping and have the throttle open even 1/4 then my hand is basically level and my levers need to be adjusted to the same angle for me to reach them easily. makes sense. problem comes in where i needed to chop throttle and climb on the front anchors and then the lever ends up ABOVE your hand and outta reach. i either had to release my grip, readjust, brake and then shift to overgrip again but in the split second i kept rolling the throttle back on to get to my brake lever and getting in a big tangle (crash follows here... 😛 ) maybe we just gotta perserve and train ourselves to make this process 2nd nature. iv found that theres so many techniques in MX that require you to do that as they often seem completely opposite to what is natural or comfortable at first. if every pro knows that overgrip is the way to go, im with them. now i just need to get this damn cast off so that i can practice!!!!! 🙂😛😛:applause::eek:

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Ricky sits down alot when he rides so his position isn't affected to much by where the levers are

How would you know if RC's sitting or standing? :applause:

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Bubba could put his levers straight up in the air because he never uses the clutch.

Ricky sits down alot when he rides so his position isn't affected to much by where the levers are

Are you serious? Bubba is on a 2 stroke so he probably even uses the clutch more than Ricky.

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