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fastest riders fall often and hard?

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I was reading the latest DIRT BIKE magazine and there was a article that describes a couple races through the eyes of Russ Pearson and Destry Abbott.

I was a bit surprised to read how often and how hard these guys get off during events.

It seems that they ride faster than they can see and get "caught out" when the terrain changes.

Is it typical for top riders to ride faster than the they can see??

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They definitely have to ride faster than they can see if they are top pro's. I do it and I just ride trails with friends. Most say that I ride very fast but when I am in my "zone" then I am trusting things that are not real or even unknown. Sometimes I feel like I have a sixth sense about what is coming up over the hill that I am climbing at (45-50mph?) when realistically I have absolutely no idea what is on the backside or if I will have time to react.

When I am wrong then I am usually buying new parts for my bike. :applause:

When I can react quickly to every obstacle and maneuver correctly then it is one of the best "High's" you will ever have.

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my favorite saying "if your in control, your not going fast enough" i have around 150 acres with miles of trails that i ride daily for about 1-2 hrs. sometimes 5-6 if im riding with people. i straight FLY on those trails. sometimes you cant even see whats going by, rocks infront of you, anything. you just gotta have a little luck on yourside i think when trying to fly. the other day i was riding some unfamiliar trails at a friends house and it looked like a sweet jump, so i came flying up to it, and saw there wasn't anything on the other side. well i had to slam on the brakes, and when i looked over it was about 20 feet straight down, and a river full of huge rocks :applause: close one

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that may be true for the dezert guys at times. i don't believe it is true for the enduro guys. you can't really win races if you're having serious getoffs more often than very rarely. bikes break, people break, dnf's happen.

mw

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The same with GNCC guys. Depending on how they are spaced out on the track and what point in the race just the time on the ground instead of on the bike can ruin a race.

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Very interesting, MP. As you already know, we get to ride and race against some serious talent up here in the Rockies. The fastest riders seem to practice for hours on end without a bobble. Then on race day, there's carnage everywhere. Like most of us, I think the faster riders practice in their comfort zone, but they take it up a notch in the heat of competition. You're a fast guy, what do you think?

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Smooth and in control seems to be the ticket in the GNCC's on OLN.

No doubt they are flying by all mortal standards, but they never look out of control.

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I could of swore I heard Rodney Smith say the secret to winning is to go as fast as you can without crashing, as a crash will end your day or maybe even your season.

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The top guys aren't even really going that fast most of the time. They just don't keep constantly losing there momentum over little stuff like the rest of us do.

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The slower you go, the faster you get:thumbsup:

Focus on riding smooth, it pays off in the long run. Dont be a TP!

Falling and having to pick your bike up uses energy your going to need in the race and can be the differance from 1st to 5th. Dont try to ride fast, just ride smooth and the speed will come.

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Might be a bit off topic, but is there a right and wrong way to fall off in different situations.

In the past two years i've broken ribs on both sides of my body from two separate offs, the most recent being just last weekend.

In both cases its a simple case of front end washout and i hit the ground still holding onto the bars. I think my arm/elbow hits the ground first then the bike and my body, breaking my ribs in the process.

Should I be bailing earlier?

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Flyin Dub:

I think that I'm too old to fall as much as it takes to win, but I might be able to push it just a bit more.:applause::eek:

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Might be a bit off topic, but is there a right and wrong way to fall off in different situations.

In the past two years i've broken ribs on both sides of my body from two separate offs, the most recent being just last weekend.

In both cases its a simple case of front end washout and i hit the ground still holding onto the bars. I think my arm/elbow hits the ground first then the bike and my body, breaking my ribs in the process.

Should I be bailing earlier?

Once you know you're going down let go and get away from the bike as safely as you can. Try to roll across the ground when you hit.

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Big Ivy I think you got it.

I'm old and slow and don't take to kindly to crashing...but I remember Mike Lafferty sailing up a big snotty hill all the rest of us were stuck on for like 20 minutes. He just didn't back off for nothin'..not the slime, the trees nor the rocks or the crashed bikes ...just positive 2nd/3rd gear mo all the way to the top.

Did not look at all like he was over his head...just Cruizin right up.

The Hancock ride 2 years ago was the same thing... huge mud ruts everywhere and the ISDE riders just rolled through it ..Once I lost the mo I was dead stopped....They just smoothed on by. Did it all day long

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The top guys aren't even really going that fast most of the time. They just don't keep constantly losing there momentum over little stuff like the rest of us do.

i had the excellent experience of starting on an early A minute at the arizona national enduro, so late on the 2nd lap, in the gnarliest part of the long A loop, the pro's started catching me. the weren't going much faster, but they were going very smoothly making no mistakes. of course that was in a section where a fall would have been a race-ending disaster.

mw

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A friend of mine who races Pro says that he keeps it at 95% when he races. He said that he learned that tip from Steve Hatch.

Mistakes such as falling not only slow you down, they also sap energy.

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