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rear brake slip on tight corners (sweepers)

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Hello,

I usually go to a MX track only for condition or to have some fun with MX-only friends.

Last time I was "racing" for fun with a friend that rides MX on CR250. We both tried an unknown track. Conditions were dry.

I found out I was faster in the corners than many MX drivers there while I am using the following technique:

On tight turns, I point to the chord (no berm or rut). I brake really hard, so the fork dives. While starting to turn, I release the front brake while letting the rear brake full on and the bike slide around the front wheel really quick. When I line up the bike close to the axis, I release the clutch to accelerate in the next leg.

I found out that only MXers that enter the berm (outside) at speeds :eek: I can't even imagine entering a berm may compensate for the 30ft extra distance to cover compared to the chord trajectory.

I talked to some guys that race MX. They told be that blocking the rear to pivot the bike is crap :applause:

What's your opinion ? Does anything work better than my "crap" in a flat dry "inside"?

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If I read correctly, you're talking about brake sliding?

I can't tell you if anything is faster, because I would have to see the turn.

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Yes, I guess it is called brake sliding a turn (i corrected my first post accordingly).

So if it has a name, so it is probably usefull in some cases !

When do you personally prefer this technique to others and how do you implement it ?

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So I did a forum search with "slide braking"...

Found the answer of Gary Semics:

"I believe you're refering to squaring off a corner (brake slide/power slide. THis is a great technique to use when the corner is tight and slippery with no berm. Come straight into the corner and use both front and rear brakes. When you want the rear end to slide around let go of the front brake, pull the clutch in and lock up the rear wheel. As it's sliding about half way around the corner pich up the slide with the clutch and throttle. There you will have the brake slide/power slide". :applause:

So I was doing it right 🙂

Dwight's contribution on the topic:

"I tend to use both styles depending on the terrain. If more open terrain I like to use a smooth flowing style of riding. BUT, when the going gets tight I usually will brake slide around a corner and blast to next corner, braking hard at last moment and then pivot lots of times sliding the rear with brake and then transitioning to power to maintain my slide and exit.

Cher'o,

Dwight "

Now I can learn to be fast in berms .. :eek:

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I never use that technique. Takes too much effort and you don't have much controll over the bike when it's sliding around on you.

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I never use that technique. Takes too much effort and you don't have much controll over the bike when it's sliding around on you.

This technique does take a lot of effort but this is how I make up time on the guys that go out wide. I try to keep the distance around the track as short as possible. More work, slower speed in corners, faster lap times this is not always the easiest but it gives me an option on lines and a place to pass.

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I never use that technique. Takes too much effort and you don't have much controll over the bike when it's sliding around on you.

you have total control over what the bikes doing. I use this all the time. If there is a wide berm i will usually take that just because squaring off a corner you change your traction quite a bit. When you ride a berm you stay accelerating while squaring off you have to completely stop your back wheel then start it again which can loose time if you spin out or cant get traction. You just have to know your terrain and how to control your bike. Its really a valueable skill to have. also good to keep your weight ontop of the bike for better traction when leaving the corner. If you get to know this well you can cut a turn short and use it to pass alot of times.

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