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Waterpump Splooge... Possible overheating culprit.

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Guys,

I've had some overheating problems with my 01 520EXC that seem to be mostly solved but I've got some more issues.

On the waterpump cover on the left side of the cylinder, I'm getting what looks to be coolant leakage. The coolant does not seem to be coming from the gasket but from the area just to the right of the "Made in Austria" area. This hole is on the right side of the waterpump and is about 2-3 mm big in circumference and is angled down at a 45 degree angle. I've noticed the coolant splooge last time I rode but wasn't sure if it was from bleeding the system or not. This time I took care to clean the cylinder surface to recheck for this coolant leak. And leak it did.

Does anyone know what this hole on the side of the waterpump is? Is this a blowoff of some kind. What is the function of this hole.

Thanks,

Concho

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Usually that hole is an external indicator of when the end is near for the water pump seal.....the design allows the water to dribble out instead of staying in the engine and potentially mixing with the oil.

Jon

'00 DRZ400E

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Conch,

Jon is exactly right. Worn waterpump seals will allow coolant to flow out the holes you mention. When you replace the seals, take the time to check your camshaft bearings as if they are worn it may allow the shaft to float and wearout the seals.

I had the coolant flow out when the camshaft bearings on my 400exc collapsed.

Guy

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Talk about "Paranoid"! Would it be best to check this bearing out and possibly replace it? I'm starting to hear more and more stories of this bearing failing and frying the motor. Anything we can do to prevent anymore horror stories?

[This message has been edited by StormTrooper (edited 07-24-2001).]

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Originally posted by guyb63:

Conch,

I had the coolant flow out when the camshaft bearings on my 400exc collapsed.

Guy

Guy,

Could you elaborate more on your bearing failure? I think I lost mine over the weekend. Engine started knocking and very shortly after that the weep hole was pouring antifreeze out.

What was involved in the repair? Did you do it or did a shop do it? If a shop, what is their name and contact info? If you did it, do you remember the parts list? Did you use KTM or off the shelf bearings?

Sorry for all the questions but the need is obvious.

Thanks much.

------------------

John Brunsgaard

jejb@att.net

01 400 EXC, 99 250 EXC (gone), 99 200 EXC, 98 125 EXC, 98 380 MXC (long gone)

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Jon,

Sounds as if you have become the latest victim.

My inner camshaft bearing collapsed while I was criusing along with my 9yr old son.My bike had travelled less than 2000klm and was meticously maintained by myself. KTM have shown no interest at all and I am still waiting for them to return mu calls and e-mails.

Luckily I have a good friend you was able to do the reapirs for me at no charge. I was also lucky than it occured at such a slow speed. The damage would have been much worse had I been at full tilt. As it was I had to replace both camshaft bearings, Waterpump seals and o-rings and repair the ignition cover which was damaged by the flywheel flinging debris. We managed to find all 7 balls of the failed bearing and most of the cage which holds the balls. I have been changing my oil every 100klms and seem to have got all the metal out. I don,t know if there is any way of preventing the problem, as I believe that it is due to faulty bearings. The inner race on the failed one was quite pitted and rough. It is unfortunate that KTM don,t seem to be interested in what is becoming a common failure. I know of few here in OZ and there seems to be more appearing in your part of the world. I also know of one in Sth Africa.

Good Luck

Guy

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Jon,

Sounds as if you have become the latest victim.

My inner camshaft bearing collapsed while I was criusing along with my 9yr old son.My bike had travelled less than 2000klm and was meticously maintained by myself. KTM have shown no interest at all and I am still waiting for them to return mu calls and e-mails.

Luckily I have a good friend you was able to do the reapirs for me at no charge. I was also lucky than it occured at such a slow speed. The damage would have been much worse had I been at full tilt. As it was I had to replace both camshaft bearings, Waterpump seals and o-rings and repair the ignition cover which was damaged by the flywheel flinging debris. We managed to find all 7 balls of the failed bearing and most of the cage which holds the balls. I have been changing my oil every 100klms and seem to have got all the metal out. I don,t know if there is any way of preventing the problem, as I believe that it is due to faulty bearings. The inner race on the failed one was quite pitted and rough. It is unfortunate that KTM don,t seem to be interested in what is becoming a common failure. I know of few here in OZ and there seems to be more appearing in your part of the world. I also know of one in Sth Africa.

Good Luck

Guy

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You will also see leakage from this area if you over fill your radiator. Check the owners manual, the specification(from memory)is 10mm above the core when cold.

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Originally posted by Craigy:

You will also see leakage from this area if you over fill your radiator. Check the owners manual, the specification(from memory)is 10mm above the core when cold.

If you did happen to overfill your radiator it would simply flow out the overflow hose

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I've heard about the cheap bearings that KTM uses in these bikes, so I will be replacing my cam bearings with quality German bearings on my next valve adjustment if I can locate some. Just some preventative maintenance. I've already replaced my front and rear wheel bearings and spacers. Erik

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[/b]

If you did happen to overfill your radiator it would simply flow out the overflow hose

[/b]

Yes, thats true but it also puts extra pressure on the water pump seal causing the seepage from the telltale hole.

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Guys,

I've got the parts on order for replacing the seals. I'm hoping these aren't on backorder since this problem seems to be going around.

While I'm in the engine I might as well replace the camshaft bearings. Who has a source for quality bearings that will work. Also who are the major players in the high quality bearings world.

Later,

Concho

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Hey guys,

how hard is it to do, or maybe a better question is how do you put the new bearing in? can it be done without removeing the head, do you need a puller? maybe someone who has done this job could post a detailed list on how to do the job!!

thax

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My radiator level is set to spec at 10mm over the core, so I don't think this is the problem. I'm suspecting cooked seals but I'll post back this weekend when I open up the engine.

I also have splooge coming from under the starter motor, and I'm wondering about that as well.

Way too many problems for a bike with less than 100 miles on it.

Later,

Concho

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Originally posted by bultaco290:

Hey guys,

how hard is it to do, or maybe a better question is how do you put the new bearing in? can it be done without removeing the head, do you need a puller? maybe someone who has done this job could post a detailed list on how to do the job!!

thax

I haven't done the job but I've got the service manual and I've gotten lots of helpful info from the net and emails. The manual shows a puller being used to pull the bearings off the camshaft. The head can stay in place but the 'rocker box cover' has to come off, of course. The manual shows the cam chain needing to be split but they're doing a total tear down. Guy sent me some email saying the camshaft can be removed without splitting the chain.

I would not attempt this without the service manual, personally. It shows you where the timing mark is on the cam sprocket and how to line that up correctly, shows you how to set the radial play on the rocker arms before tightening the shaft bolts, etc.

------------------

John Brunsgaard

jejb@att.net

01 400 EXC, 99 250 EXC (gone), 99 200 EXC, 98 125 EXC, 98 380 MXC (long gone)

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KTM has just come out with a new style water pump seal.It is a dual lip rubber seal.You can replace it just by removing the water pump cover and impeller.NO need to remove the rocker cover.

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Do you guys think it is possible that the leaking water pump seals are allowing water to enter the bearing housing, and that this is what is causing the bearing failure,.... or is it fact that these cam bearing can let go without the help of a leaky waterpump seal??

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Any water leaking into the engine will mix with your engine oil and not be fed directly to the nearest cam bearing. You should notice this contamination during your oil changes. This water will have an advere affect on many engine components not just the cam bearings.

The cam bearings are lubricated from a splash pool of oil kept full by one of the oil pumps. A cam lobe splashes and distributes this oil to the 2 cam bearings.

When my cam bearing failed (2001 model 520), no coolant escaped from the water pump. This was probably because it was not the bearing adjacent to the water pump. Secondly, I was able to shut the motor down before other major damage was done to the motor and its moving parts.

On inspection , no obvious cause of the failure could be determined (no oil starvation or excess wear through poor maintenance procedures). It was obviously a dud bearing.

For all those persons , now opening their tool boxes, about to embark on an engine stripdown, the only words of hope I can offer is that I did have some warning before the failure. The motor had developed a sort of squeely rumble. These motors are noisy at the best of times however when compared to another unit, mine was a lot louder. The noise appears to come from the lower part of the engine, which tends to make one think, its a clutch noise. While trying to find the noise I had had the valve clearances set. They were slightly out (some too loose, the others tight)which would be the case with a cam bearing that was busy collapsing.

So then , phone your buddy and compare noises. Check your valves, they could also offer a clue, otherwise strip and replace before the bearings collapse - you will know when this happens, an awefull rumble and knocking from the engine.

Incidently while repairing my motor, I had to replace the piston, which was badly scratched ??? I dont know if this was caused by floating bits of bearing or was from an independant incident ie. sucking in river sand during a river crossing etc.

Craig Williams

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Guys,

Here's a picture of the waterpump weep. The weeping radiator fluid has attracted a lot of Oklahoma dirt on my last ride. I've compared my 520 to my buddies 400 and he's just not experiencing the troubles that I am.

WaterPumpResize

Later,

Concho

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