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rocky uphills, I bounce off!

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Well, I tried most of your suggestions:

Backed off the compression and rebound (actually set them back to stock setting. I was running them in a few clicks in cause it felt great at times)

Really got on the gas over the rough stuff

looked up the hill more

got in crouch position, head over bars with tail off the seat.

Went through a very large rock section that had previously been very hard for me. Now I have confidence!

Went up about 4 miles of rocky, off camber steep section, picking awesome lines and leaving behind a friend who used to complain I did not keep enough momentum for him to be behind me comfortably.

thanks to all.

(Of course later I was hauling ass, lost it and sprained my shoulder. Oh well, life at 45) :banghead:

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Well, I tried most of your suggestions:

Backed off the compression and rebound (actually set them back to stock setting. I was running them in a few clicks in cause it felt great at times)

Really got on the gas over the rough stuff

looked up the hill more

got in crouch position, head over bars with tail off the seat.

Went through a very large rock section that had previously been very hard for me. Now I have confidence!

Went up about 4 miles of rocky, off camber steep section, picking awesome lines and leaving behind a friend who used to complain I did not keep enough momentum for him to be behind me comfortably.

thanks to all.

(Of course later I was hauling ass, lost it and sprained my shoulder. Oh well, life at 45) :banghead:

Glad you feel more comfortable.

Often, I ride everything from the nastiest rocky up and downhills to high speed whoops, and everything in between all on the same ride. The suspension settings are completely different for those things. So, I just wrote down the settings that felt perfect for rocky technical stuff and for hi speed whoops, then split the difference. That was my starting point. It's not perfect for either, but it's pretty good for both.

Your ideal settings will reflect your riding style and preference, and it will depend on what type of terrain you will be riding that day. My settings rarely change much because my terrain is so varied anyway, it would hurt more than help. I like to set it, then forget it. Where have I heard that before? One thing, though. As Dwight said, my high speed compression is backed way off. "High speed" does not refer to the speed you are traveling, it refers to how sudden the shock will have to compress, like when riding up a curb vs up a smooth gradual whoop face.

I'd adjust only one or two clicks at a time.

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Best bet is to use 12 psi in the tires. Reduce the compression till you bottom once and a while lightly. Increase your rebound about 1or 2 clicks from stock on Jap bikes and about 6 to 8 clicks on KTM. You want your suspension plush. You also want to add flywheel weight to motocross bikes . You want the suspension to move and not throw you around.

Cher'o

Dwight

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Keep your momentum and don't ever let go of that gas! Also try to pick the line that looks like the rocks are most firmly planted in the ground. Sometimes it is a neccesity to hit big rocks when its not wise to steer around them. That is when you hit it as perpendicular as possible and roll on the throttle. My XR200 will climb just about anything I have seen in Colorado so far so your CRF should be just fine. I climbed this last weekend using that method:

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b302/fretslider51/P9100009.jpg

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b302/fretslider51/P9100011.jpg

Unfortunately the pics don't look as impressive as it did in person but let me tell you this trail was nasty, and quite steep.

I have the best advice. Dont ride on that crap. If its a must and only in certain areas to get to where you going. Quit thinking and pick a line a hit. Your tire will soak it up.

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Backing way off the compression and h/s compression sounds great for hills? What does that do for me if I am also riding in sand and mud?

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Backing way off the compression and h/s compression sounds great for hills? What does that do for me if I am also riding in sand and mud?

It probably means you have to find a compromise. For my use, the ideal settings for high speed whoops and for mud are about the same. But the settings for rocks and gnarly technical stuff are really different than those. Just so my bike would have no bad habits, I had to split the difference and put up with imperfect settings nearly everywhere.

BTW, we don't have much mud here, but there's plenty of deep sand.

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Ok now that I had a tougher ride and did some good rocky climbing (no falls! :banghead: ), I have a question about this...

Several folks above talked about standing for a "rocky uphill". The guy I rode with has a lot of experience (short of racing, tho he's considering an enduro next summer), and he agreed with what I noticed. On the rocky bits when the wheels wanted to bounce off everything.. running 12-13psi.. I had much better stability if I kept my weight back. Best results seemed to be from sitting in many spots. Was this just a traction issue on the rear (i.e. exception), given the steep grade? Confidence thing? I was def. challenged here - only rode suburban grassy stuff many years ago.

What factors help determine when to stand or sit on bouncy climbs? I plan to do many more... :applause:

-

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