Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Flat tires

Recommended Posts

In the past year I have had two pinch flats in the front tire. I just purchased MSR heavy duty tubes for the front and rear. I have also heard that tires with a thicker carcass will help reduce flex and help prevent pinch flats but I am not sure how much of a difference this will make. I was also thinking of running "slime" in the tubes in case of a puncture. I wasn't too sure about doing this because I think the slime would settle in the bottom of the tube when stationary causing it to become lopsided. Is this a good idea? How much will these things help?

Thanks all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Run at 15 psi in rocks and stuff.

HD tubes, always. I've never ever had a pinch flat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought a heavy duty tube. Its really heavy duty! Its made by Fly and its 4mm thick! Havn't tried it out yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

run the tires at the correct pressure, best and cheapest insurance against flats there is. We run ours at 12-15 psi and havent had a flat in going on 3 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We run ours at 12-15 psi and havent had a flat in going on 3 years.

Watch what you wish for. I had no flats on my mtn bike for about 6 years, until I started bragging about it. I flatted twice in one day on 2 separate occassions and have totaled 6 flats this year. :applause::banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a heavy-duty tube together with tire slime. After you put the slime in the tube, you reinflate the tire and spin it/ride it to spread the slime around the inside.

I do a lot of trail riding and flats have been rare. I got a flat a couple of weeks ago when a very sharp small pointed rock punctured my tire and tube. Much bigger than a thorn. I limped back to the truck, reinflated the tire, and the slime sealed the big hole.

I ended up changing the tube anyway, but it was amazing to see the slime work so well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run a tubeless rear tire on all of my bikes and I ride with no weight on the bars and with relaxed elbows so the front tire with tube isn't punished by my weight on it.

No tube to pinch and no rim locks to mess with... No flats for over 15 years.. ever since the tubelesss tires became available.

Sorry, don't know if tubeless tires are a good or bad option for regular dirt bikes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run Bridgestone HD's with pirelli mt16's over severe rock and rocky creek jumps with 10 to 12 psi max. and have not had any flats (knock, knock). They are like tractor tubes and a real mother to install, especially if you have big hands, but they are awesome performers. :banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't like slime, I have problems with it gumming up the valve stem and causing flats, instead of preventing them. I run fly super duty tubes, covered in baby powder to help avoid chaffing. Some of my friends take and old tube and cut the stem out and slice it down the middle and run it as a casing aroung another tube. I ride in rocks almost all the time, I run 15 psi in the really rock areas, and 12 just about anywhere else. I won't say I have never flatted, but it does not happen often, and I always run a fresh tube for a race.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
where do u get tubless tires

Most standard Trials Competition REAR Tires are tubeless. But to realize the full benefit, you need to run it without a tube and that means on a tubeless style rim.

All the modern Trials Bikes come with tubeless rear wheels. I don't know if the entire wheel and tire will fit anything but the bike it was built for, but I'm sure you could have one built if you have enough money... Don't know how much that is cause I've never needed to. All of my bikes come with tubeless rims and the Michelin X-11 Tubeless Competition Radial.

It's probably cheaper in the long run and guaranteed to be the best possible traction if you buy a modern Trials Bike!

:busted: Unless the wife is the financial manager.. :busted::banghead:🤣:banghead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aren't the trials tires rated for less speed as related to tube type knobs? That would mean a risk of tire failure at high speed sections of a course. :ride:

It depends upon on how you define "High Speed" and for what purpose.

The modern Trials Competition Radial in NOT designed for precision and control at any speed on pavement. It will do OK if you adjust your riding style to be more conservative. It can get you from point A to point B at speed.

The modern Trials Bike is capable of speeds at or above 70 MPH. In the Scottish Six Days Trials, riders need to fly flat out on the roads to make up time between the sections. This event is probably the main reason Trials Bikes have such a high 5th and 6th transportation gear compared to the very very low 1 through 4th competition gears as on my Gas Gas. The tire must hold up to that speed between sections for this one event and I'm sure the makers of these tires know this.

If you have these tires on a Trials Bike, don't worry. Run them at the recommended pressures and ride the bike where it was designed to be ridden and all will be fine.

If you are using these tires on a non-Trials Bike there will be some compromise involved. If your riding is mostly in tight and technical trails at relatively low speeds, say below 25 MPH, then it can be a most excellent tire. If most of your riding is on faster single track or dirt and or paved roads, then I think you can do better with a different tire.

And if the power band on your bike makes it necessary to spin your tire on take-off or in turns so that you do not fall off of the power band, then I believe this is absolutely the wrong tire for you.

Trials People run these tires at 4 PSI rear and 5 PSI front as a starting point and then up or down by 1 PSI depending upon dry or wet conditions. I hear non-Trials Bikes do very well at 5 to 8 PSI rear.. The higher in pressures you go and the higher your average speed, the more you stray away from the tire's intended use and optimum performance.

If will not blow up at 75 MPH, but then why would you want to use it if that is a common speed in your riding day?

:applause:

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In '03 5 buddies and I rode from La Paz to Mexicali over 5 days. I was the only one running Bridgestone heavy duty tubes (XR 600, Kenda Trakmasters) and was the only one not to have a flat. Convinced me. :applause:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...