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removing the water pump - 2005 TE-510

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page F8 of the shop manual shows a picture and it seems simple but it adds a sentence about removing the timing driven gear behind the pump in the motor top end compartment and it shows a hand holding the gear as you slide out the pump body........this part worries me. i was hoping to remove the pump and disassembled it to examine the impeller, even though impeller damage is not on the list of suspect issues casuing over heating, this summer my bike has over heated some under stress and well being a mechanical engineer I want to check that impeller...but not if by sliding the pump shaft out it will cause that timing gear to move and screw me up.

so can i just remove the pump body and shaft out and then slide it back in the hole?

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page F8 of the shop manual shows a picture and it seems simple but it adds a sentence about removing the timing driven gear behind the pump in the motor top end compartment and it shows a hand holding the gear as you slide out the pump body........this part worries me. i was hoping to remove the pump and disassembled it to examine the impeller, even though impeller damage is not on the list of suspect issues casuing over heating, this summer my bike has over heated some under stress and well being a mechanical engineer I want to check that impeller...but not if by sliding the pump shaft out it will cause that timing gear to move and screw me up.

so can i just remove the pump body and shaft out and then slide it back in the hole?

The easy answer is no.

The water pump shaft is the axle for the idler gear that carries the cam chain. It's not hard to pull the cams out with the motor in the frame, then you can take out the water pump. I did this last week in about 30 minutes.

Follow the manual step by step. Here's the synopsis.First drain the coolant and remove the waterpump hoses. You can unbolt the radiators and let them hang on their hoses. Then start like you're doing a valve adjust. Find TDC etc. Remove the 10mm bolt on the cam tensioner, then the guts of the tensioner, then the body of the tensioner off the cylinder barrel. Remove the cam caps. Remove the lube pipe. Remove the cams. Unbolt the waterpump. Slide the pump away from the head while supporting the idler gear/cam chain. Put a small screwdriver through the hole that the "axle" left vacant. You now have your water pump

When you put it all back together I recommend that you drain your engine oil and pull your ignition cover so you can put a 17mm socket on the flywheel nut to rotate the crank back and forth a little to locate the paint mark/single dots to replace the cams.

It is really that easy. Keep track of where the parts came from. I use paper lunch bags and I draw a little picture of how the parts fit. The cam caps are numbered and must be put back where they came from in the right direction. Get a good foot pound torque wrench too. Just dont drop any parts down the cam chain path. Shove clean rags in every hole and have a magnetic probe ready.

Overheating a lot? When was the last time you cleaned the mud out of your radiator fins and straightened out all the folded flat ones?

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ah thank you very much for that explaination but I'm too clumsy to do all that, without a friend to help......... I'll clean my radiators i realy dont expect to over heat this winter but the one time it heated i was being followed by another TE-510 and his bike was fine. it was only about 80 that day and I had only slipped the clutch a little bit. that was the day i had a hole in my coolant bottle........so maybe the hole let loose some vapor...but yeha it has normally over heated this summer in slow tight up hill climbing stuff wnet i have sliiped the clutch...that is pretty streesful..so i figue the bike is ok and I'm not doing all that tear down just to see the impeller.

It does look like a weird impeller design in the book, those little tabs and all looks like a paddle wheel not very efficient or productive i suspect.

With the bike running and the rad top off I can see lots of fluid movement..so i assume the pump is good, was just curious trying to eliminate that as a possible failure....not worth the effort though at least untill i have to shim the valves then Ill do all that.

thanks for the tutorial - good to know.

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Another tip: don't take the timing cover off: stick the bike in gear with the bike on the stand and locate TDC by slowly rotating the rear wheel.

That's how I get my bike TDC for adjusting the valves.

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Mostly true with the tire trick except I have a Rekluse clutch. The other reason is with the waterpump out, you can be very delicate and focus on the marks as you turn the flywheel.

But for just doing a valve adjust with a stock bike, sure.

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Well said Flyred. I used the wheel method when checking valves but when I am trying to get the bike on time again I take the timing cover off. I wish though that Husky put a TDC mark on the flywheel (or is there?). As well as alternate marks.

Bigbob,

It's not near as hard as it sounds. As far as the timing, you just get your bike on TDC. Line the center gear with the timing mark on the head. Line up the marks on the Cam Gears with the other 2 outer marks on the center gear.

The center mark has 2 indentions. If you take your valve covers off it will become apparent. As flyred said tho, get yourself a good torque wrench. The Cam caps don't require much torque and are easy to damage as with most cam caps on most bikes.

After doing 2 topends on 2 4s 4 wheeler and 1 YZF recently, the Husky is just fun to work on:)

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