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CRF230 Idling Problems.

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Whenever I am riding and I stop and let off the throttle it takes a long time for the idle to go down. If it's idling low and I rev it up and hold it for a second, then let off it will rev high, but if it's reving high and I quickly give it a little throttle and then let off the idle will drop. Anyone know what's wrong? It's starting to piss me off.

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I would first check the two throttle cables (one push/one pull) to make sure they're not crimped or routed incorrectly, and that they are adjusted properly. Next I'd check the throttle assembly on the handlebar to make sure it is returning all the way. Then I'd check inside the carb to see if there is some sort of dirt or grit that is keeping the slide from dropping fully.

Cheers,

Mac

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Checking the throttle cables is a good idea.

Usually though, what you describe is called a hanging idle. This is the result of a lean condition in the pilot circuit. Try opening your fuel screw in 1/4 turn increments until it returns to idle normally. Make sure your bike is warmed up from a bit of riding when you make the adjustment(s). Make sure you keep track of how far you go, so you can return it to where you started if you need to.

Do a search on "hanging idle" for more reading if you're curious. It's quite common.

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Could be cables. Don't be afraid of the carb though. Let us know what you find.

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What do you guys have your fuel screw set at? I'm at sea level, 120 main, 45 pilot and stock needle in 4th position.

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I'm not riding a CRF, but on my bike if you need to open the fuel screw beyond 3 turns from fully seated, then you need to go up one on your pilot jet.

Screw yours in until it seats (don't twist it too hard), counting the turns and fractions until it seats. For example, mine is open 2 1/4 turns. Yours will probably be different because you are on a different bike. The principle is the same for 4 strokes though. Record this number in your jetting notebook (very handy to have), so you'll know where to re-set it.

A notebook on jetting is something you'll refer to again and again. Record your settings, temperature, altitude (if you change when riding), humidity,etc along with your impressions of how the bike responds to your adjustments. Here's a nice link to get you started on jetting.

http://www.motocross.com/motoprof/moto/mcycle/carb101/carb101.html

You probably already know all this stuff, but there's probably someone reading this thread who can benefit. Good luck.

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I'm not really sure why it's doing it but I'm sure it's not the throttle cables. A while ago I had the bike with stock jetting, needle in 4th position, baffle and snorkel removed. I got bored one day and decided to put it back to stock and ride it around with the baffle in and the needle in 3rd clip. Then I got the idling problems and have had them ever since I put the bike back to 4th clip, took the snorkel and baffle out. I still have them after I did the 120 main, 45 pilot and needle in 4th position a while ago.

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What is the stock pilot jet size? Barton is right, usually a hanging idle is caused from a lean condition in the pilot circuit.

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That same thing was happening to me when it was brand new and i noticed that the throttle was loose so i tightened it and it fix it instantly

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