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Sprocket question

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Can someone explain how changing the drive and rear sprockets on a bike changes its performance? Do you change the front and rear at the same time, do you change one or the other, etc? Thanks

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I swapped the front for one tooth higher on my TE to match the TC gearing. I don't ride so much slow stuff and this made the gearing better suited to GNCC type events by making 2nd and 3rd longer and giving me a faster top end.

3 hours last weekend and no one passed me on the fast stuff. That really pisses off the 'fast' guys because they then have to work harder to get passed!

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Basically for the heck of it....a smaller front sprocket will yield more torque and More grunt but shorter gear range before shifts. The same can be said with a larger rear sprocket but maybe less dramatic. Usually 1 tooth taken down in the front is like 2 teeth added in the rear. Now if you go the opposite the results will reverse. Add 1 tooth in front and the bike will be longer in gear range but less torque or grunt. Go down teeth in the rear for same result but less dramatic. Most people change front because it is easier and cheaper tan new rear sprocket and chain. Hope this helps and if anyone wants to chime in I am not an expert.

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Tugsy, you are right except the difference in one tooth on the front to on the tooth rear is 3.67. one tooth on the front is like 3.67 on the rear if that helps. :banghead:

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stock on the TE front is a 14 tooth sprocket--but for desert i use the 16 tooth from AFAM...coming from Nevada you might want to start with the 15 and then go to 16 if you do lots of wide open stuff or stretches of pavement.

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Interesting. I got it with a 13 tooth sprocket up front, with an extra 14 tooth original, and I thought my seller did the 13 tooth for more speed.

I'd prefer more torque, so sounds like I should leave the 13 and not put on the 14 up front?

I ask about torque because I took it out for a ride for the first time with the 13 tooth sprocket up front and it had great accleration, but not the snap to lift the front tire off the ground.

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Sounds like you're getting too much wheel spin. Check you're tire psi. That 570 should be able to pull a wheelie in 3rd or even 4th gear without much effort.

Jerry

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I'd also keep in mind that with a 13 your getting a pretty tight bend for the chain up there and thats not alot of teeth for the torque of a 570 to be chewing with. I'd try to use the larger countersprocket. What size are you running on the back? Maybe room to go up there. I just went from a 14-50 to a 14-48. Little taller in each gear. I probably have similar low end power so getting the front tire up is easy at low rpm and the taller gearing just allows that pull for longer.

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I'll count the back, but I believe it is a 50. So, right now, it has the 14-50, but I haven't ridden it since putting the 14 on to replace the 13. Thanks for the info!

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I've always thought the same ratio, one in front equals three in back (since my early days riding/racing CT-1's. My TC came with an 14/50 combo. I switched to an 16/46 combo. All the difference in the world. Just got cleared to return to work today after a 6 month rest. I can smell a Baja or desert weekday/weekend soon. :banghead: Steny

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Its easier to do the front,less to remove,it depends what you are after,with the close

ratio box on the late models its harder to acheave a happy medium,if you are after

big speeds with less engine revs,big in front OR small in rear,if you are going to Bonneville both,if you do tight woods the opposite,down side is really small in front stresses the chain,or lack of clearance as per the rear guards rubbing on the Tyres.If you really want to get keen there is a suspendion component,there is a change to the angle that the chain runs on and it affects the action of the rear shock,but that is only going to come into it if your going for world title,

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Unless the bike is strictly being used for mx or enduro (mountain/hill terrain), I lower the rear sprocket to say 48 and the play with the countershaft sprockets for different terrain gearing. I don't run a CS sprocket cover, so changing gears is easy. And you can go from say my 16, down to a 12 and back up again depending on the terrain to be ridden that day or weekend. Steny

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You can figure out where your gearing is at or where you want to change to by simply dividing the rear number of teeth by the front number.

From above:

14 front 50 rear = 50 divided by 14 = 3.57

16 front 46 rear = 46 divided by 16 = 2.88

In this case, 2.88 is going to have way more top speed than 3.57 but less low end torque. A higher number will give you more low end torque. A lower number will give you higher top end.

The following combinations would give you very close to the same results:

14 front 53 rear = 53 divided by 14 = 3.79

13 front 49 rear = 49 divided by 13 = 3.77

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