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ENZO Suspension

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I have the enzo suspension with the little resevior things and was wondering if anybody else had them. Just got the bike a few weeks ago havent really ridden it much. What all does it help and all the goods and negatives about them is what i wanna know thanks guys.

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The principal behind sub-tanks has to do with the air space in the fork. There has to be an air space above the oil in a fork so that the fork can compress the full 12" of it's travel. As this trapped air is compressed, it becomes, in effect, a second spring, adding to the stiffness of the fork. You can fool around with your oil level and make the fork feel a little softer by lowering it, or harsher by raising it.

The problem with the older KYB's in particular is that by the time you get the oil level low enough to have the mid-stroke start to feel fairly plush, it's so low that the dampers start to suck air, and foaming and bottoming result. Raising it high enough to avoid that results in the captive air being so highly compressed at 8 or 9 inches of travel that it feels nearly solid. The ride gets harsh, and seals get blown.

Sub tanks counter this simply by making more room for air above the oil. With a tank or tanks, you can raise the oil level even beyond the max (I run it at 75mm). It feels better than a fork with the oil at 130mm, yet resists bottoming as though it had much more. The rise in air pressure through the stroke is reduced a lot, and the ride feels overall much better.

By using flow control valves, another element of control is introduced. The valves are set up to meter air leaving the fork, but allow air to return freely. Note that they are made with the flow going either way, so choose the ones that suit your layout. Allowing the air to return freely is important because otherwise, a vacuum would be encouraged to form on the upstroke, which could draw more air into the fork (synergy or other double lip seals may stop that). If that happened, you could end up with a build up of air pressure faster than normal.

By metering the flow of air leaving the fork, you can, in a sense, create a kind of high-speed damping adjustment. If air can move to the tank with no resistance, then the spring effect of the captive air will depend on the total volume contained in the forks and the tank(s). But if it is metered through an orifice, it will still behave more or less the same way when the fork movement is small or slow, but when hit hard, the air within the fork will be compressed faster than it can escape into the tank, providing a temporary boost to the spring rate of the fork.

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