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Wheelies: How to

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- On/Off technique: If your just starting out, just use first gear if it won't come up with a twist just on/off the throttle(it loads the suspension) and snap it back on, the harder the snap the faster it will climb. That is just until you get the hang of letting the wheel come up and not chopping the throttle early. Always cover the back brake if it gets to high just tap the rear brake and back on the ground you are.

-Bouncing: second gear on (if on/off will work the use it), depending on power of your bike. Bouncing will get it up quicker than, just powering it up. The quicker you can get it to balance point the more throttle you will have to ride out the wheelie. Ride in what ever gear until you are close to the powerband, stand up, steady throttle, bounce the bike and as the bikes suspension goes down hammer on the throttle until it raises up to where you want it and back off the throttle and maintain the balance. When you bounce you are using your legs to bounce the bike on the pegs not the bars. It is almost one motion as you bounce roll on the throttle, if you wait until you have already bounced the power will come on after the bike has almost rebounded and it will not work. When your at balance point you should have to give little throttle and can technically ride the same gear and speed forever. The back brake will save you if you start to go over to far.

-Clutching the best method: You can use it in all gears but in first be very careful you will need to catch it with the back brake if you are trying to roll super slow 1st gear wheelies(I will not get into this here). I say second gear on, you roll at whatever speed you want and any gear but the top gears might not work. It is like using the friction zone, Just pull in the clutch to where it just starts to slip and give it throttle at the same time and up she goes. It is not pull in clutch rev and dump it is at the same time. Start with a 1/8 turn of the throttle if it just jerks forward twist it a little more at a time until it comes up to were you want it, if it does not come up then give it more gas. It will take practice but once this method is perfected then you can roll slower more predictable safer wheelies and ride them a lot longer. Does it wear the clutch? Hardly noticeable. All pros on dirt and big bikes use this meathod, it feels safer and provides the most control to learn technical stuff.

Moving your weight toward the rear always helps

Good luck and always cover the back brake, I encourage you to practice with it just to see how it works. Always make sure the front wheel is straight before you set it down. You can even wheelie a moped(any bike will wheelie) with these techniques.

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In your description of the clutch method I wasn't clear if you ride the wheelie with the clutch slipping or you just get it up with the clutch slipping then release the clutch and ride it. Also any tips on how to keep your front wheel from turning while it's in the air?

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In your description of the clutch method I wasn't clear if you ride the wheelie with the clutch slipping or you just get it up with the clutch slipping then release the clutch and ride it. Also any tips on how to keep your front wheel from turning while it's in the air?

you ride it with the clutch released.

I still cant ride a good wheelie, but i havent had much time to practice between injurys.

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It will happen naturally as soon as it goes up you will let the clutch back out and it is only slipped for a second. Keep on the gas after that or your wheelie will come down.

Just thinking about keeping the wheel straight will help, just don't turn the bars if your wheelie is going to the side you lean the bike not the bars(the front wheel is not on the ground anymore but it is a instinc and I move them sometimes but just set them straight as it comes down.

If it does not come up give it more gas and you can clutch sitting or standing. Practice is the only teacher. I will write a endo tutorial if anyone is interested? I wrote this because I have seen a lot of lame pic and videos on this site. There is no reason why anyone can't wheelie a dirt bike, it is so easy coming from a 430 lbs, 150 hp, $11k rocket, there is nothing to be afraid of, it is on dirt, it is supposed to hit the ground unlike a nice shinny street bike and your not pulling a 100+ mph hyway standup.

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It will happen naturally as soon as it goes up you will let the clutch back out and it is only slipped for a second. Keep on the gas after that or your wheelie will come down.

Just thinking about keeping the wheel straight will help, just don't turn the bars if your wheelie is going to the side you lean the bike not the bars(the front wheel is not on the ground anymore but it is a instinc and I move them sometimes but just set them straight as it comes down.

If it does not come up give it more gas and you can clutch sitting or standing. Practice is the only teacher. I will write a endo tutorial if anyone is interested? I wrote this because I have seen a lot of lame pic and videos on this site. There is no reason why anyone can't wheelie a dirt bike, it is so easy coming from a 430 lbs, 150 hp, $11k rocket, there is nothing to be afraid of, it is on dirt, it is supposed to hit the ground unlike a nice shinny street bike and your not pulling a 100+ mph hyway standup.

my thoughts exactly :banghead:

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I just jerk on the bars and pull it up. I do my wheelies setting down and have gotten real good at it. I find if you are just learning to wheelie, find a nice dirt road, that runs straight uphill a bit. Wheeling in first gear is tough as the bike doenst have much gyroscopic to keep it up straight, will tend to fall over to one side, but this can improve the balance, so it may not be a bad idea to work in first gear. When I do a slow wheelie and it goes sideways, I wil stick my leg out on the opposite side to off set and keep the bike going longer. Looks goofy, but works well. Going uphill keep the bike from generating speed which will assit you in wheeling in one gear much longer and getting a feel of the balance. Keep your right foot near the rear brake in case you start going over. Work on the balance, keep the nose low and as you improve, bring the bike further up to the balance area. I have a WR450F that stands up in every gear without a tug except 5th (and it will with a tug) and as I wheelie this and a shift comes up, I make sure its wound up a bit, shifting with too low of an rpm on a wheelie can bump it over backwards. Standing wheelies are easier, and if you could mount some rear pegs on the back of the swingarm close to the rear axle, stand up on these, the balance wheelies can be easier to learn this way. Its tough to do. Big high compression 4 strokes are the easiest bikes to wheelie, they make good low end power to stand up and the balance is so easy, and if you go a bit too far, off the gas, the high compression engien braking will set it right back down quickly. Big bore 2 strokes are the hardest, ie KX500, YZ465 etc. And any high strung 2 stroke ie YZ85, YZ 125, while a YZ250 is easier, but still tougher than a big thumper. A KDX220 is a great wheelie bike also, but requires some extra tugging. If you really want to impress others with a long wheelie, remove your frotn disc brake, replace the caliper with a 12V DC motor, and the disc with a sprocket, and hook a switch to the handlebars to turn this motor on. Stand it up, the front wheel gets spinning and with the gyro, you'd have hard time going over.

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i'm trying to get the wheelie down..i have too much fear though...i day dream about building a long straight wheelie barn that you can hook a bike up with rope to the rails on the ceiling

try to make a safe way for anybody to come over and train to ge the wheelie down. or a wheelie bar that you can mount on the back of any bike that can be set to the balance point for a bike...

i'm 35 now, i'm worried if i'll ever do it in my lifetime

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hmmmm... that looks pretty easy to rig up..wish i had a place to build one...i'd pay to go some place and ride a dirtbike with that on there to learn the wheelie

....bet a lot of guys would ....

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HEY- keep it up, looking good. It is good to take pictures beacuse you can see how high it really is. I would bring it up a little more once you can not see over the fender and have to look over the side you will be close to balance point on a sit down, but on that rough ground I would not. good luck on one wheel up.

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yea ill practice on bringing it up some more next time i go riding thanx for the advice

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i have gotten pretty good at riding wheelies on my 97 DR350s. i start in second, rolling at about 15 mph. wick on the throttle and the front comes up. just as it rises to the point that the front of the fender is at eye level, i run thru the gears, modulating the throttle. i can get it to sixth gear, easy greasy to hold it on the balance point then. i can carry the front tire probably 60-70 yards like this. sometimes i start out in third gear, takes a little longer for it to get to the sweet spot and you have to be in a sweet spot initially to avoid peaking out the powerband too early. i enjoy pulling a massive wheelie for the neighborhood kids when they least expect it! properly done, you aren't working the bike any harder than when you have both tires on the ground.

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i was juz wondering if the technique for wheelin a 4 stroker n 2 stroker the same coz i m wheeling a 2 stroker

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It is for any bike but you will have to be more careful on a 2 smoke because of that crazy power band. I would use the clutch because of the lack of bottom end and you can then ease into your power band. I not sure how it would be trying to power it up and balance it while hitting the power band on a 2 smoke because I never rode one.

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I have a Honda XR250R 4 stroke and am a new rider as of this June. I started practicing a few weeks after I got the bike. I first had to sit way back on the seat and pull up on the bars as I gave it throttle. I recently changed the counter sprocket from a 13 tooth to a 12 and now it comes right up with little effort and at a more centered seating position. I haven't gotten it to the balance point yet I always chicken out and just let off the throttle. At 46 I can't afford a serious injury.

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there is nothing to be afraid of, it is on dirt, it is supposed to hit the ground unlike a nice shinny street bike and your not pulling a 100+ mph hyway standup.

Ever seen road rash from a 5th gear CR500 wheelie gone bad? THAT is something to be afraid of!

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i was juz wondering if the technique for wheelin a 4 stroker n 2 stroker the same coz i m wheeling a 2 stroker

im wheelying a 125 2 smoke i do it in 2nd gear, go from no powerband to powerband but dont pull too hard or lean over the back fender because the wheel will come up then jus get it up to the balance point and ur set. of course easier said then done im working on the balance part of that right now :banghead:

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